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This submission is a question for the administrators of racebending and their followers. I am designing characters for a children’s story I am working on. As you can see above, my style is simple (think of Adventure Time). The cast of characters are from diverse ethnic and racial groups. The way I indicate the characters’ race  is when I color then in different skin tones and say what nationality or racial group/mixture. 
One day, a friend of mine looked through my sketches on this characters. She pointed at one character that I labeled as Japanese and told me she thought this Japanese character does not look Japanese because she does not have slanted eyes. 
I was like… what?
….
None of my characters even look realistic! I mean, they have such a simple look you cant even tell their nationality or race unless by their skin color or my straight forward written description of them. I know my friend does was not trying to be offensive, but *sigh* idk. 
Should I draw my Asian characters with slanted eyes? I really don’t because it is sensitive! When I write the story, I just want to say, “She is Japanese!”   
I am Haitian American by the way!
Submitted by Sono-Lin
Admin Response: I think giving your character “slanted” eyes would be a big disservice to your art.   Not all Asians have slanted eyes, and the “slanty eye signifies Asian” in animation thing is a white American construction!

This submission is a question for the administrators of racebending and their followers. I am designing characters for a children’s story I am working on. As you can see above, my style is simple (think of Adventure Time). The cast of characters are from diverse ethnic and racial groups. The way I indicate the characters’ race  is when I color then in different skin tones and say what nationality or racial group/mixture. 

One day, a friend of mine looked through my sketches on this characters. She pointed at one character that I labeled as Japanese and told me she thought this Japanese character does not look Japanese because she does not have slanted eyes. 

I was like… what?

….

None of my characters even look realistic! I mean, they have such a simple look you cant even tell their nationality or race unless by their skin color or my straight forward written description of them. I know my friend does was not trying to be offensive, but *sigh* idk. 

Should I draw my Asian characters with slanted eyes? I really don’t because it is sensitive! When I write the story, I just want to say, “She is Japanese!”   

I am Haitian American by the way!

Submitted by Sono-Lin

Admin Response: I think giving your character “slanted” eyes would be a big disservice to your art.   Not all Asians have slanted eyes, and the “slanty eye signifies Asian” in animation thing is a white American construction!

i wanted to share my experience with growing up Jewish, because there are very few characters on tv who are confirmed as being Jewish and if they are they don’t celebrate the same holidays as me. i really loved watching Rugrats because Didi’s parents were a lot like my grandparents but with accents, and they had Passover and Hanukkah episodes alongside their Christmas episodes. the only other show that ever happened on was As Told By Ginger. i remember Rugrats also had a Kwanzaa episode in the same vein of celebrating, not making a very special episode out of the Carmichaels’ ethnicity. it was a really great show. anyway, I just wanted to give an example of a show that i think really did something right in regards to representation, at least from my white Jewish perspective. 

Editor’s Note re: this submission—  Religious diversity is still really rare in most media.  A friend of mine who is Mizrahi pointed out to me that when characters are Jewish they are usually Ashkenazi and that it’s still rare to see Jewish religious practices depicted even if characters are Jewish.

The Bling Ring: New Sofia Coppola Movie

Can we talk about how minorities can’t even STEAL anymore without being whitewashed?

The Bling Ring is based on a group of teenagers in Hollywood who burglarized celebrity homes in 2008 and 2009. They hit the homes of Paris Hilton, Rachel Bilson, and Orlando Bloom, among others, stealing over $3 million dollars in cash and other belongings.

A quick Google search will reveal the names of the kids who committed (and were convicted) of the crimes. There are several POCs among them: Rachel Lee, Johnny Ajar, Diana Tamayo, Roy Lopez Jr.  But in Sofia Coppola’s movie, all of them (Emma Watson plays the ring leader) are white. 

I’m not even sure if this is an argument I should be making…But it’s almost hilarious to me that they would whitewash even these kids. I guess POCs aren’t glamorous enough to commit Hollywood crimes.

Note from Editor: : The submission doesnt mention this, but actress Katie Chang has been cast to play the character based on ringleader Rebecca Lee. Katie Chang is an Asian American actress (one of her grandparents is Korean). However, the focus of the movie is on Emma Watson’s character and yes, the Latino teens who were part of the ring in real life appear to have been replaced by white characters.
Reblogged from faineemae  1,587 notes
faineemae:

disneyforprincesses:

jigglemahpuffslikearealnigga:

c-lov3r:

feministdisney:

Left is re-imagined Mulan, right is still from Mulan film. Pretty drastic difference, not only in the color of her skin, but also in the shape of her features (new lips are fuller, new face is slimmed and longer). The new Mulan’s eyes now seem to have a blue highlight, making them look like Western blue eyes. Hmm…
[submission with a closer shot]

ok, I kept seeing these types of mulan posts on my dash tonight and wasn’t going to say anything but… blue eyes??? really disney?

….way to whiteify everything
and also Jasmine’s dolls are whitewashed to hell and back and no on like Tiana
…awesome job disney

NOPE

the blue eyes, damn why

faineemae:

disneyforprincesses:

jigglemahpuffslikearealnigga:

c-lov3r:

feministdisney:

Left is re-imagined Mulan, right is still from Mulan film. Pretty drastic difference, not only in the color of her skin, but also in the shape of her features (new lips are fuller, new face is slimmed and longer). The new Mulan’s eyes now seem to have a blue highlight, making them look like Western blue eyes. Hmm…

[submission with a closer shot]

ok, I kept seeing these types of mulan posts on my dash tonight and wasn’t going to say anything but… blue eyes??? really disney?

….way to whiteify everything

and also Jasmine’s dolls are whitewashed to hell and back and no on like Tiana

…awesome job disney

NOPE

the blue eyes, damn why

Reblogged from leidis  8,031 notes
leidis:

damnlayoffthebleach:

pornjunkyard:

trishna87:

nevertoomanyspiders:

strugglingtobeheard:

damnlayoffthebleach:

I thought this experience I had recently might interest you guys! I think it’s an exercise a lot of artists could benefit from.
CC: Thank you so fucking much for submitting this. Seriously.

Yes at that bottom line. When will white people learn they are the global minority in the realist sense of the world and the world don’t revolve around them. This exercise is super interesting as well cause I’m not an artist but wow, mentally what that takes is so interesting.

Whoa, interesting!

truth

This has been bothering me for a while and i finally realized why.
While the bottom line is important, artists should strive to be able to represent convincingly other ethnic groupss other than their own, the example the teacher did is pure bs, i mean  the plaster statue was in a position that made it imposssible to identify clearly its features, the fact that it turned out to be the bust of a black person when they could barely see a tiny part of its facial features say nothign about the capacity of the artist to represent a minority,  theres no point to be made,  just a really shitty art exercise used to make a really good point unfortunately.


CC: Actually, the fact that the majority of the classroom interpreted the bust as that of a white man says a lot about human perception and the messages ingrained into us from birth. Your little image of Shrek does nothing to add relevancy to the incorrect point you’re trying to make. The artists of the classroom were most likely aware they were drawing a true to life human being and not a fantasy character or a comedic sketch. White supremacy has impacted the way people perceive characters, whether they possess a race or not. White people are represented as the default in western society so much so that people of color are not considered until specified. For instance, the assumption that the Simpsons family is a white family (this assumption was made before the race of the Simpsons was specified). Think about why that assumption was made, when the Simpsons had yellow skin (Marge Simpson possessing curly blue hair). In addition, the assumption made by westerners that characters in Japanese anime are white because they don’t “look Japanese”. Non-white races are represented in the media with distinct “othering” factors (slanted eyes for east asian people, wide noses and distinct mannerisms for black people) so that when a group is presented without these factors, they’re automatically assumed to be white. And even a third example: the issue with perception in literature. Unless a character’s skin color and race are specified, they’re automatically assumed to be white (and sometimes, even when the character’s skin color and race are specified, people still manage to overlook the words and make the assumption of whiteness once again —- see; the Blaise Zabini fandom and their misconception that Blaise was a white boy although he was clearly described as beautiful and black). You can’t tell me these examples don’t have some serious messages embedded in them concerning racial dynamics.
That was the point of the experiment.
Unless the professor had SPECIFIED that the bust was of a Black woman, she was automatically assumed to be a white male. Because whiteness and maleness are dominant in our western society, they will automatically have dominant roles unless they defined as “other” (race wise and gender wise as well).

Also, the busts weren’t facing away from them. They were set at a drastic angle, but distinct facial features could still clearly be seen. There was still a visible bone structure or else why bother?
The exercise was completely valid. The point, and what all artists struggle with, was to draw what you see NOT what you think you see.
When we’re unpracticed at drawing from life, our minds compensate by filling in our gaps in skill with information.
Draw the actual car in front of you, not what you think you remember a 1969 Charger looks like.
Draw the building in front of you, not what you think the building looks like.
And this anecdote is particularly devastating because it beautifully illustrates some of the internalized racism and biases people carry around with them. 
Think about about what it means that despite what their eyes were telling them, everyone in that room knew that they saw a white man.

leidis:

damnlayoffthebleach:

pornjunkyard:

trishna87:

nevertoomanyspiders:

strugglingtobeheard:

damnlayoffthebleach:

I thought this experience I had recently might interest you guys! I think it’s an exercise a lot of artists could benefit from.

CC: Thank you so fucking much for submitting this. Seriously.

Yes at that bottom line. When will white people learn they are the global minority in the realist sense of the world and the world don’t revolve around them. This exercise is super interesting as well cause I’m not an artist but wow, mentally what that takes is so interesting.

Whoa, interesting!

truth

This has been bothering me for a while and i finally realized why.

While the bottom line is important, artists should strive to be able to represent convincingly other ethnic groupss other than their own, the example the teacher did is pure bs, i mean  the plaster statue was in a position that made it imposssible to identify clearly its features, the fact that it turned out to be the bust of a black person when they could barely see a tiny part of its facial features say nothign about the capacity of the artist to represent a minority,  theres no point to be made,  just a really shitty art exercise used to make a really good point unfortunately.

CC: Actually, the fact that the majority of the classroom interpreted the bust as that of a white man says a lot about human perception and the messages ingrained into us from birth. Your little image of Shrek does nothing to add relevancy to the incorrect point you’re trying to make. The artists of the classroom were most likely aware they were drawing a true to life human being and not a fantasy character or a comedic sketch. White supremacy has impacted the way people perceive characters, whether they possess a race or not. White people are represented as the default in western society so much so that people of color are not considered until specified. For instance, the assumption that the Simpsons family is a white family (this assumption was made before the race of the Simpsons was specified). Think about why that assumption was made, when the Simpsons had yellow skin (Marge Simpson possessing curly blue hair). In addition, the assumption made by westerners that characters in Japanese anime are white because they don’t “look Japanese”. Non-white races are represented in the media with distinct “othering” factors (slanted eyes for east asian people, wide noses and distinct mannerisms for black people) so that when a group is presented without these factors, they’re automatically assumed to be white. And even a third example: the issue with perception in literature. Unless a character’s skin color and race are specified, they’re automatically assumed to be white (and sometimes, even when the character’s skin color and race are specified, people still manage to overlook the words and make the assumption of whiteness once again —- see; the Blaise Zabini fandom and their misconception that Blaise was a white boy although he was clearly described as beautiful and black). You can’t tell me these examples don’t have some serious messages embedded in them concerning racial dynamics.

That was the point of the experiment.

Unless the professor had SPECIFIED that the bust was of a Black woman, she was automatically assumed to be a white male. Because whiteness and maleness are dominant in our western society, they will automatically have dominant roles unless they defined as “other” (race wise and gender wise as well).

Also, the busts weren’t facing away from them. They were set at a drastic angle, but distinct facial features could still clearly be seen. There was still a visible bone structure or else why bother?

The exercise was completely valid. The point, and what all artists struggle with, was to draw what you see NOT what you think you see.

When we’re unpracticed at drawing from life, our minds compensate by filling in our gaps in skill with information.

Draw the actual car in front of you, not what you think you remember a 1969 Charger looks like.

Draw the building in front of you, not what you think the building looks like.

And this anecdote is particularly devastating because it beautifully illustrates some of the internalized racism and biases people carry around with them. 

Think about about what it means that despite what their eyes were telling them, everyone in that room knew that they saw a white man.

Reblogged from stopwhitewashing  3,857 notes

I don’t know if you’ve seen this before, but I just saw it on facebook and thought it would be relevant to this blog (though we all know Hollywood only bothering to hire PoC when they need bad guys isn’t news)
To be honest, I was surprised to see this on facebook because most of the people know think I’m a ‘reverse-racist’ and too sensitive, I can only hope that this is progress.
-cardassianprincess

I don’t know if you’ve seen this before, but I just saw it on facebook and thought it would be relevant to this blog (though we all know Hollywood only bothering to hire PoC when they need bad guys isn’t news)

To be honest, I was surprised to see this on facebook because most of the people know think I’m a ‘reverse-racist’ and too sensitive, I can only hope that this is progress.

-cardassianprincess

White supremacy, Asians are not the same, and Visibility of South-East Asians.

People, people! I won’t shut up about this. Please hear me out. I want this issue to be made aware of.

You are making posts regarding Zoe Saldana. You are complaining about a lighter-skinned black woman playing another black woman, and you are calling it “white supremacy”.

You just posted about the casting discrimination and how Filipino actors only get sidelined to be nameless side characters to fill in the “ethnic” roles.

So why did you say “at least it’s an Asian person” when I complained about Gao playing an Indonesian man? Even Racebending’s mods had to tack on a note to my complaints saying that “While this is a legitimate concern, this is not possible bla bla bla” and the bottom line of it is “Why can’t you just be glad it’s an Asian person that got cast?”

I am not that naive to expect Hollywood to suddenly get up and specifically demand for South-East Asian actors, but at least I want you all to be aware that this is a problem. That this is wrong. That this is something to be fussed over with so Holly wood will realize that this is a problem.

How is selecting Godfrey Gao to play as Magnus Bane not “white supremacy”?

The inhabitants of Irian Jaya island look like Australian Aborigines. The inhabitants of Java island, who are among the lightest of the Indonesian locals, could pass for semi-light Africans.

A Javanese person could claim to be related to President Barack Obama and it would still make sense.

Look at this picture comparing the real Obama to an Indonesian “Obama-lookalike”:

Look at this picture and see how Obama blended in with the locals:

The lightest of our locals are at best as pale as Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss, as you can see in the picture above. The palest of Indonesians are those who are part-Caucasian or descendants of Chinese immigrants.

Even if Gao got himself a tan, it doesn’t fix the problem. It’s like Taylor Lautner being tanned and 1/16th Native American passing off as Native American.

South-East Asians have even LESS exposure than East Asians (Japanese, Korean, Chinese). What are we to the “Western world”? Disaster victims (see the 2004 tsunami). Exotic natives of a tropical paradise. A third world country that needs to be pitied. Nobody (“Indonesia? What’s that?”). A country where the majority of the population are Muslims. Only a handful of our musicians had broken into the ranks of international media, and hardly any of our actors are known outside our own country before The Raid: Redemption movie.

To say that “at least it’s an Asian actor” is insulting. If someone had casted a Chinese to play the role of an Indian, people would kick up a fuss. Hey, but they’re also both Asians! Nope, it doesn’t work that way. Casting a light-skinned, Chinese-American Godfrey Gao as Magnus Bane, who is identified as Indonesian local, is just as wrong as casting him to play an Indian man.

Again, I know it’s impossible to hope for Hollywood to cast South-East Asian actors for big roles, but if we don’t raise the concern, the issue will never come to light and the executives are going to just continue on being unfair.

Note: This is a submission from http://daeva-agas.tumblr.com/

Reblogged from stopwhitewashing  237 notes

The overall impression the letter leaves is that he is more concerned about being called a racist than he is actually acknowledging that the methods in which he utilizes are racist, harmful and degrading to People of Color, most especially Native Americans. Native Americans, who on top of being the centerpiece of genocide in the name of “the progression of the ‘United States of America’”, have been routinely misrepresented in major motion picture films and television since as early as the 1930s; the greatest example being choosing white actors to portray the stereotypes of Native Americans and painting their skin, wait for it, BROWN (or red, which earned the practice the name “raceface” or “redfacing”).

…the fact that no one ever used “Rick Boer is racist” in a sentence so much as they stated “What Rick Boer is doing is racist” compounds the all too apparent reality that when people hear the word “racist” in relation to a problematic practice they love or enjoy, they immediately turn the issue inward on themselves and play the victim. It’s all about them, it’s not about the point the POC is trying to get you to see.

By Excerpt from a submission to Stop Whitewashing on a cosplayer whitewashing Assassin’s Creed III’s Native American hero.

"All Asians Are The Same" is not really any better than whitewashing

cassandraclare:

vanillanightt asked you:

It’s not really a question, but an observation. I understand the reasons, but on Facebook after the recent post about TMI casting information a lot of fans are confused as to why they would want an Asian actor for Magnus Bane. Think you could clear it up, once again, to clear the confusion?”

Okay, although I admit I am confused about the confusion. They want an Asian actor to play Magnus because Magnus is Asian. (Technically, Magnus is biracial. I would be perfectly happy with a biracial actor playing him — but otherwise the option is an Asian actor, not a white actor. It doesn’t matter if any of Magnus’ background is white. Casting him white would erase that part of his background that is Asian. And important. There are plenty of roles out there for white actors. Most roles are for white actors. This is not one of them. There is very little I have control over as regards casting. I cannot pick an actor for Magnus. I don’t have that ability. But I can say, and say strongly, that I want them to cast an Asian or half-Asian actor, and I did. It is pretty much the one ironclad demand as regards casting that I have made, i.e. : if you don’t cast an Asian actor, I’ll never talk about this movie again, nor will I see it.)

Let’s take a quick look at some example descriptions of Magnus from the books:

City of Bones, first time we meet Magnus: “Clary could tell from the curve of his sleepy eyes and the gold tone of his evenly tanned skin that he was part Asian. He wore jeans and a black shirt covered with dozens of metal buckles…”

In Clockwork Angel, when Tessa first sees him: “His hair was like rough black silk, so dark it had a bluish sheen to it; his skin was brown, the cast of his features like Jem’s.” (This was difficult, because Tessa doesn’t have the language or knowledge to think about race this way — she says Magnus is “of foreign extraction” — but “the cast of his features was like Jem’s” means he looks like the only other person in the book who is half-Asian. Jem. His skin is also described as brown in Clockwork Prince.

From Magnus’ Vow, things in Magnus’ possession: “a half-burned piece of stationary from the Hong Kong Club — a place he had been barred from not for being a warlock, but for not being white.”

And: “He touched a piece of twisted rope nearly at the bottom of the pile, and (Magnus) thought of his mother, the daughter of a Dutch colonialist father and an Indonesian woman.”

In City of Lost Souls, when Magnus says I love you to Alec, he says it in Indonesian. Also in City of Lost Souls (you can cover your eyes if you’re avoiding spoilers, though this is not particularly key to anything:)

“Where was Magnus born?”

“Batavia, if you must know. Indonesia. Of course, it was the Dutch East Indies then. His mother was a native.” (Meaning: she was Indonesian. Not a fan of the way Camille words this, of course, but it’s the way she would word it, and Camille is not a nice person.)

I’ve seen people say “But Magnus is only a quarter Asian! So he could totally be played by a white actor!”

Except, no. Magnus is the same race as his mother. He is half Asian. Because his father was a demon. Demons do not have a race: warlocks are by default whatever race their human parent is. And I am somewhat disturbed by the eagerness to try to paint Magnus as white, or whiter, when he clearly is not. He is clearly, visually not: both viewpoint characters in both series on being introduced to him, notice that he is not white, but Asian. (This is not really even my favorite thing to do: when I look back on City of Bones one thing that I don’t like about what I did is introducing Magnus that way. I feel like Clary noting that he is Asian underlines that somehow “the default is white.” But even though she does notice it, obviously a huge amount of people assume Magnus is white anyway. So I feel there are better ways I could have and should have handled it, but clearly that information has to be gotten across.)

I have gotten many letters over the years from readers who are happy that Magnus is not white, that Jem is not white, that Maia is not white, that Aline is not white. The fact is that most parts in books are for straight white folks and even more so in films. There are not that many parts for actors who are not white — even less substantive ones. Taking those things away by casting Magnus as white and talking about him as white does cause actual pain to actual people — and to what end? Why? Why send the message you only want to read about white people and only want to see white people on your screens? 

Here’s a really good post on fancasting Jem as white, for instance:

http://alohomorashlie.tumblr.com/post/19970036382/listen-infernal-devices-fandom-i-usually-like-you

I remember being told early on in the whole movie process (before I sold the rights) that I should be wary about having written a biracial character, because if there is any excuse to cast a character as white, even if they are not, even if they are only half, Hollywood will take it. I am not sure this is the time for Racism 101 (explanations of what privilege means and the fact that racism is systemic — not random isolated instances but a message we get over and over and over in the most insidious possible ways that says that white is the default, white is better) but there is a reason the term “whitewashing” exists. And it happens, all the time.

http://colorlines.com/archives/2010/07/whitewashing_of_hollywood.html

The general assumption that is always made about characters is that they are white. I am constantly asked if Jem is Chinese, even though he is from Shanghai and speaks Mandarin and says he is Chinese and is portrayed on the cover of the book by a half-Chinese model. Apparently the idea he might not be white is just that startling. And why is it startling? Because of things like whitewashing. Because if mainstream media can take an opportunity to accord more privilege to the already privileged, and make everybody white, by and large they will. And every time it happens, it contributes to the problem and makes sure the problem lasts longer.

So why are they casting Asian actors for Magnus? Because Magnus is Asian. (And a casting call for Asian actors also means half-Asian actors. Because if you are half-Asian, in Hollywood, you’re considered Asian. Give that some thought.)

You don’t want Magnus and Alec’s romance cut out of the movies, or them made straight. I know you don’t. Casting Magnus as white is no better. Just …think about it, okay?

NO! NO! NO!!!!

Standing up against whjitewashing is an improvement, BUT NOT GOOD ENOUGH. NO.

Stop applauding Cassandra Clare. Do you know what she did? Her supporting Godfrey Gao to act as Magnus Bane instead of saying “Well, a different man could be better” is proof that she thinks All Asians Are The Same. THIS IS BAD.

Magnus Bane is supposed to look Indonesian. NATIVE Indonesian. Not Chinese-immigrant or “peranakan” Indonesian, but native Indonesian. Local. Cassandra Clare said said so herself. A local Indonesian native does NOT look like Chinese or Japanese people. This is what local Indonesian men looks like:

Indonesian actors EXIST. The recent movie The Raid: Redemption had starred Indonesian actors. If for some reason those actors are not available, a Filipino or Indian actor would have been better for the role. Godfrey Gao is Asian, that’s good, but he still isn’t quite the right Asian man for the job.


A note on this submission: These are definitely valid points and actors from certain Asian ethnicities are featured more often than others due to sinocentricism. This does reinforce stereotypes of all Asians looking a certain way, and also colorism/shadeism. However, I also think the author had to fight Hollywood really hard just to get the word “Asian” added. Having the casting call read “Indonesian” might have been next to impossible…and that is Hollywood’s fault. If the author hadn’t done anything, the character would have been cast with a white actor. So this is an uneasy middle ground, but even convincing Hollywood to cast a character in an adaption with the same race, if not the same ethnicity, is an accomplishment.