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Reblogged from rexilla  45,755 notes

When I first got this role I just cried like a baby because I was like, “Wow, next Halloween, I’m gonna open the door and there’s gonna be a little kid dressed as the Falcon.” That’s the thing that always gets me. I feel like everybody deserves that. I feel like there should be a Latino superhero. Scarlett does great representation for all the other girls, but there should be a Wonder Woman movie. I don’t care if they make 20 bucks, if there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman. You know what I mean, ’cause little girls deserve that.

By Anthony Mackie (via rexilla)
Reblogged from comicsalliance  576 notes
comicsalliance:

GAY PUNCHLINES, LGBT VISIBILITY AND MARVEL STUDIOS’ ONE-SHOT ‘ALL HAIL THE KING’
By Andrew Wheeler

And this is throwback, retrograde, oh-so-’80s being-gay-is-something-that-happens-in-prison frat house humor. And this is the first presentation of a same-sex relationship or anything resembling a gay character in the Marvel Cinematic Universe across eight movies, five one-shots, and fifteen episodes of television. And that is the part that burns.

As a gay man watching this, let me tell you how I respond. I try to laugh. Why do I try to laugh? Because that is the good, obedient, go-along-to-get-along thing to do. My identity is being presented up there on the screen as something that should make the audience laugh, and I am conditioned to think that I should find this funny and laugh along and not cause a scene — even though I am watching this movie on my own and there is no-one here to cause a scene for.

We are so used to being clowns for the majority audience that I feel like I’m letting people down if I don’t laugh. I feel like I’m inconveniencing straight people if I say, “Please sir, can I not be the punchline?” Do you know how painful that is? How shameful it is? How it makes me want to cry that I would want to laugh at being dehumanised rather than stand up and protest, because I’ve been led to think that protesting makes me a bad person? Do you know how it stings to feel conditioned to want to betray oneself like that?

Some of you surely do. Which begs the question: Why is our entertainment making us feel like this?

And it turns out I can’t laugh. Not today. Not any more. Because I am not a clown. And I want better from Marvel Studios than this.


READ MORE

comicsalliance:

GAY PUNCHLINES, LGBT VISIBILITY AND MARVEL STUDIOS’ ONE-SHOT ‘ALL HAIL THE KING’

By Andrew Wheeler

And this is throwback, retrograde, oh-so-’80s being-gay-is-something-that-happens-in-prison frat house humor. And this is the first presentation of a same-sex relationship or anything resembling a gay character in the Marvel Cinematic Universe across eight moviesfive one-shots, and fifteen episodes of television. And that is the part that burns.

As a gay man watching this, let me tell you how I respond. I try to laugh. Why do I try to laugh? Because that is the good, obedient, go-along-to-get-along thing to do. My identity is being presented up there on the screen as something that should make the audience laugh, and I am conditioned to think that I should find this funny and laugh along and not cause a scene — even though I am watching this movie on my own and there is no-one here to cause a scene for.

We are so used to being clowns for the majority audience that I feel like I’m letting people down if I don’t laugh. I feel like I’m inconveniencing straight people if I say, “Please sir, can I not be the punchline?” Do you know how painful that is? How shameful it is? How it makes me want to cry that I would want to laugh at being dehumanised rather than stand up and protest, because I’ve been led to think that protesting makes me a bad person? Do you know how it stings to feel conditioned to want to betray oneself like that?

Some of you surely do. Which begs the question: Why is our entertainment making us feel like this?

And it turns out I can’t laugh. Not today. Not any more. Because I am not a clown. And I want better from Marvel Studios than this.

READ MORE

Reblogged from 18mr  604 notes
18mr:

Y’ALL. I am legitimately sick of white characters being better at Asian cultures than Asian characters.What if Marvel cast an Asian American Iron Fist for their Netflix Original Series? WHAT IF?Let’s make it so!

18 MillionandRising has launched a petition asking Marvel to cast an Asian American to play Iron Fist!    Think of all the problematic stuff this casting would fix!

Click here to  sign the  petition!

18mr:

Y’ALL. I am legitimately sick of white characters being better at Asian cultures than Asian characters.

What if Marvel cast an Asian American Iron Fist for their Netflix Original Series? WHAT IF?

Let’s make it so!

18 MillionandRising has launched a petition asking Marvel to cast an Asian American to play Iron Fist! Think of all the problematic stuff this casting would fix! Click here to sign the petition!
Reblogged from upthecatpunx  574 notes
upthecatpunx:

comicsalliance:

Fox’s Fantastic Four Rebot: What The FF?
By Andrew Wheeler
The likely cast of next year’s rebooted Fantastic Four movie from 20th Century Fox and director Josh Trank was revealed to the world last night, causing the comics internet to crack in half this morning. (It cracks in half all the time, of course. I think it may actually come in two parts.)
Miles Teller is our Reed Richards. Kate Mara is our Sue Storm. Michael B. Jordan is our Johnny Storm. Jamie Bell is our Ben Grimm. It’s a weird and controversial cast — but do fans have cause for concern?
Read More

"Second, it rrrrradically alters the relationship between Johnny Storm and his sister Sue, played by white actor Kate Mara. It is of course impossible for a black person and a white person to be siblings.

Wait, no, I’m just getting some new science in from the wire, and apparently it’s not impossible and doesn’t radically alter anything. One or both of the siblings could be adopted. They could be half-siblings. They could be step-siblings. They could be shapeshifters or space aliens or extra-dimensional constructs, because. hey, it’s a superhero movie.”


Andrew Wheeler is probably my favorite ComicsAlliance blogger.  Here’s his commentary on the Fantastic Four reboot casting.

upthecatpunx:

comicsalliance:

Fox’s Fantastic Four Rebot: What The FF?

By Andrew Wheeler

The likely cast of next year’s rebooted Fantastic Four movie from 20th Century Fox and director Josh Trank was revealed to the world last night, causing the comics internet to crack in half this morning. (It cracks in half all the time, of course. I think it may actually come in two parts.)

Miles Teller is our Reed Richards. Kate Mara is our Sue Storm. Michael B. Jordan is our Johnny Storm. Jamie Bell is our Ben Grimm. It’s a weird and controversial cast — but do fans have cause for concern?

Read More

"Second, it rrrrradically alters the relationship between Johnny Storm and his sister Sue, played by white actor Kate Mara. It is of course impossible for a black person and a white person to be siblings.

Wait, no, I’m just getting some new science in from the wire, and apparently it’s not impossible and doesn’t radically alter anything. One or both of the siblings could be adopted. They could be half-siblings. They could be step-siblings. They could be shapeshifters or space aliens or extra-dimensional constructs, because. hey, it’s a superhero movie.”

Andrew Wheeler is probably my favorite ComicsAlliance blogger. Here’s his commentary on the Fantastic Four reboot casting.

Reblogged from theatlantic  4,244 notes
theatlantic:

The Incoherent Backlash to Black Actors Playing ‘White’ Superheroes

Michael B. Jordan has been cast as Johnny Storm in the new Fantastic Four movie. For many prospective viewers, that announcement will raise the question that any announcement of a Michael B. Jordan movie raises: Will he be shirtless, and for how much screen time? Other superhero fans, though, are distracted by less wholesome concerns. Johnny Storm, they have noticed, is white. Michael B. Jordan is black. How, they wonder, can this be?
The outcry over interracial casting here appears to be much more muted than the stir over Idris Elba’s role as Heimdall in the Thor franchise, which provoked boycott threats. Still, I’ve seen people on Twitter talking about how the casting will “ruin” the franchise. I’m not going to link because I’m leery of shaming people that way on a mainstream site, but if you look around you can find them without too much trouble. (Niki Cruz has rounded up some of the response, with names redacted, here.) This echoes earlier controversies in which a campaign to get Donald Glover cast as Spider-Man met with racially fraught backlash, while the casting of Amandla Stenberg as Rue in The Hunger Games provoked angry social media whining.
Read more. [Image: John Shearer / AP; Adi Granov / Marvel]

theatlantic:

The Incoherent Backlash to Black Actors Playing ‘White’ Superheroes

Michael B. Jordan has been cast as Johnny Storm in the new Fantastic Four movie. For many prospective viewers, that announcement will raise the question that any announcement of a Michael B. Jordan movie raises: Will he be shirtless, and for how much screen time? Other superhero fans, though, are distracted by less wholesome concerns. Johnny Storm, they have noticed, is white. Michael B. Jordan is black. How, they wonder, can this be?

The outcry over interracial casting here appears to be much more muted than the stir over Idris Elba’s role as Heimdall in the Thor franchise, which provoked boycott threats. Still, I’ve seen people on Twitter talking about how the casting will “ruin” the franchise. I’m not going to link because I’m leery of shaming people that way on a mainstream site, but if you look around you can find them without too much trouble. (Niki Cruz has rounded up some of the response, with names redacted, here.) This echoes earlier controversies in which a campaign to get Donald Glover cast as Spider-Man met with racially fraught backlash, while the casting of Amandla Stenberg as Rue in The Hunger Games provoked angry social media whining.

Read more. [Image: John Shearer / AP; Adi Granov / Marvel]

    • DeConnick:

      Its just, look, women are raised without much representation in the media. So we’re taught very early on how to identify with a male protagonist. This is a switch we have no trouble making. Right?

    • But men are actively discouraged from identifying with a female protagonist because female is less in our culture and we don’t want to power down, right? Anything you do that is feminine is weak and small and not a good idea. From a business perspective, if you publish something from a male point of view, women who read these things will probably buy it anyway. But if you do the same story with a female protagonist, you are going to alienate your core readership.

    • Finke:

      But you are writing the books that are stepping out from that. You’re writing Captain Marvel and Pretty Deadly, and it sounds like eventually Bitch Planet will be a break from that as well. So, what propels you as a storyteller to say, I know that these stories are not going to propel the business side but I’m going to do this anyway.

    • DeConnick:

      I’m filled with piss and vinegar? I don’t know. It makes me angry. I was asked in an interview once: You’re writing another book with a female lead? Aren’t you afraid you’re going to be pigeonholed? And I thought, I write a team superhero book, an uplifting solo hero book, I write a horror-western, and I write a ghost story. What am I gonna be pigeonholed as?

    • Has a man in the history of men ever been asked if he was going to be pigeonholed because he wrote two consecutive books with male leads? Half of the population is women. I lose my temper here. And it’s certainly not at you. It’s just this pervasive notion that “white male” is the default. And you have to justify any variation from it.

Reblogged from ami-angelwings  15,809 notes
    poetryondemand asked
    A dude friend demanded I "name one" female superhero who could head her own movie. I gave him a list. He said he hadn't heard of any, so they couldn't be A-listers. I said Captain Marvel, Black Widow, She-Hulk are solo titles. He said they still "couldn't handle" a solo movie. I gave up. (btw he also made several factual errors that, if he'd been a girl, the other dudes would've crucified him for, but they didn't say anything.) What are we supposed to do?

    Answer:

    ami-angelwings:

    seananmcguire:

    fuckyeahblackwidow:

    mckelvie:

    thepandamademedoit:

    mckelvie:

    kellysue:

    Kill him and eat him in front of the others.  It’s the only way they learn. 

    Reminder that Iron Man wasn’t “A-list” before his first movie.

    Erm….How was Iron Man not “A-List”? He has several solo titles and is one of the main protagonists in the Avengers…. Iron Man is pretty much the definition of “A-List”

    See the bit where I said “Before his movie”. He wasn’t, he really wasn’t, one of the top names before a) Ellis and Granov’s Extremis arc/reboot and b) his first movie. 

    Until that point he was moderately successful, within comics, but certainly wasn’t a huge hit, and crucially, very few people outside of comic readers had any idea who he was. 

    Reminder that Black Widow had a solo film in production before the first Iron Man movie, and the reason it was cancelled was her gender.

    One of my best friends has been an Iron Man fan his whole life, and he was STUNNED when the movie was green-lit, because Iron Man wasn’t A-list.  We MADE these characters A-list, by loving their movies.

    In another world, very close to this one, Black Widow is THE name to beat in comic book movies right now.  I want to live there.

    Ant-Man is getting his own movie

    Daredevil had a movie

    Ghost Rider has had 2 movies

    Punisher’s had 2 movies (recently, in total he’s had 3)

    Blade’s had 3 movies and a TV show

    These are all “A-listers”?

    I bet you most people had no clue who Blade was before the movies made him a success.

    They invented a white dude out of whole cloth in the movie series in Coulson, and now he’s in video games, a live action series, an animated series, and in the comics.

    Captain/Ms. Marvel, She-Hulk, Spider-Woman, Black Widow, etc all have more of a comics history and name recognition than Coulson who didn’t even exist 6 years ago.  People act like who gets a movie is like some sort of sports draft, and they’re being picked by their college/comic accomplishments, rather than these are fictional characters who are popular if there is the will to write them well & promote them.

Reblogged from professorthorgi  10,155 notes

Moments that make me love working in a comic book store

professorthorgi:

This Wednesday, Marvel comics released All New Marvel Now #1 which featured the first super hero appearance of Kamala Khan, the new Ms Marvel who will be getting her own series next month. She is the first female Muslim character to receive her own series from either of the big companies, and because of this some people are saying this is all a stunt, that this is just something Marvel is doing to get attention. And you can say that all you want, but today two Muslim women who had never come into my store before came in and asked for the new book with Ms Marvel in it. We gave it to them and they started flipping through it and they both had the biggest smiles you could imagine on their faces. In fact I would describe both of them as being “giddy” even. So you can say its a stunt all you want, but end of the day thanks to the new Ms Marvel, those two ladies now have a super hero that they’re excited about, and that’s pretty awesome.