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Reblogged from televisionamist  462 notes
televisionamist:

racebending:

supportiveblackfriend:

I’m not sure if any of you know this. The two actresses at the top were both casted as Lavender Brown. Lavender Brown was a black girl BEFORE she had to kiss Ron. 

While there is a throwaway line in Book 6 about Lavender having similar skin tone as Ron, there is no reason why Lavender Brown could not have stayed brown in the movies—especially since the roles of characters of color in the Harry Potter films, like Cho Chang and Dean Thomas, were substantially cut down.

Okay, one, a “throwaway line” about Lavender having the same skin tone as Ron can be ignored, but when it comes to Katniss’s “olive-toned” skin, it requires two dozen essays? 


eh, maybe not two dozen essays, but there is a difference between Katniss, the protagonist of the novels, and Lavender, a side character in the series.  Have a person of color portray Harry Potter’s best friend’s single-film love interest, and the effect is pretty neglible on the outcome of the story.  On the other hand, Katniss’s skin tone is repeatedly mentioned, differentially racialized, and politicized in the novels.  Having a white woman portray Katniss fundamentally affects the dynamics of her character, particularly since the films will show people of color repeatedly sacrificing themselves for her sake and for the benefit of her character development.  

Also, Katniss wasn’t brown and then suddenly white when her character got lines.  The casting process for Katniss discriminated from the get go.  Lavender Brown’s recasting is different.

televisionamist:

racebending:

supportiveblackfriend:

I’m not sure if any of you know this. The two actresses at the top were both casted as Lavender Brown. Lavender Brown was a black girl BEFORE she had to kiss Ron. 

While there is a throwaway line in Book 6 about Lavender having similar skin tone as Ron, there is no reason why Lavender Brown could not have stayed brown in the movies—especially since the roles of characters of color in the Harry Potter films, like Cho Chang and Dean Thomas, were substantially cut down.

Okay, one, a “throwaway line” about Lavender having the same skin tone as Ron can be ignored, but when it comes to Katniss’s “olive-toned” skin, it requires two dozen essays? 

eh, maybe not two dozen essays, but there is a difference between Katniss, the protagonist of the novels, and Lavender, a side character in the series. Have a person of color portray Harry Potter’s best friend’s single-film love interest, and the effect is pretty neglible on the outcome of the story. On the other hand, Katniss’s skin tone is repeatedly mentioned, differentially racialized, and politicized in the novels. Having a white woman portray Katniss fundamentally affects the dynamics of her character, particularly since the films will show people of color repeatedly sacrificing themselves for her sake and for the benefit of her character development.

Also, Katniss wasn’t brown and then suddenly white when her character got lines. The casting process for Katniss discriminated from the get go. Lavender Brown’s recasting is different.

Reblogged from meggannn  291 notes

Moe Hunger Games commentary

denzelishaymitch:

foxxandthefeline:

Unlike most of the people I see on Tumblr, I am not still in school and have a full time job to deal with so this is the last time I’m going to bother trying to dispute those of you who seem to think you know better than the person who CREATED the character.

Suzanne Collins herself was not only present for the casting process, but actively participated in choosing who played the characters that SHE WROTE. So if she had pictured Katniss as a POC, I HIGHLY DOUBT she would have allowed them to ask for Caucasian females when they released the audition/casting details. Not to say it wasn’t racist for them to ask for Caucasian females specifically, but that was how Suzanne and the casting directors phrased it. 

To those of you who think Suzanne was pressured into it, do you honestly think Suzanne would have allowed herself to bend to that sort of pressure? She would have at least asked them to ALLOW girls of color to try out had she imagined Katniss that way. She is a strong woman who could have easily defended her choice of character’s race.

Not to mention, as I stated in the last post I wrote on the matter, she specifically said she never intended them to be bi-racial. 

Also “It’s in the future and things were moved around” while it may not have the same name, District 12 IS in the Appalachian Region, the region I currently live in. We simply do NOT have a lot of POC here. Racism is still very rampant is this area and it is not uncommon to hear foul terms like “nigger” spewed often. Even if this is futuristic, I can’t imagine an excess of POC moving here and producing a whole group of biracial people (The Seam people, who again, Suzanne said she never intended for them to be biracial)

Also, while yes, it is POSSIBLE for POC to produce offspring with grey eyes, it is not common. You can argue this point and tell me I don’t know anything about genetics (when in fact I made great grades in that particular section of all my biology classes throughout high school and college) all you want but the fact of the matter is brown eyes are dominant, and MOST POC (from ANY part of the world) tend to have brown eyes. In order to have blue or grey eyes (Prim & Katniss respectively) they would both have to have both recessive genes. With just them you can argue that since their father was similar to Katniss (and therefore had recessive traits himself) that this is possible, but for the WHOLE GROUP of seam people to look similar to them and still be considered POC, it just is not at all likely. Not to mention the fact that Suzanne herself said that she had never intended them to be that way. She was there and an active participant while Gale, Haymitch, and Katniss were all cast. All of them Caucasian. She still to this day say they did a wonderful job portraying HER characters.

So that is what it comes down to. Regardless of how you feel on the subject, the woman who wrote the books, and everyone who brought the books to life, imagined Katniss as Jennifer Lawrence portrayed her. The thought she was the best so they cast her in the role. A role which most of us out there seem to think she did an absolutely wonderful job with. Whether you like it or not she will continue to portray Katniss all through the series.


But hey, if you think you know better than the author herself and the casting directors, please continue with your ignorance. It really must be blissful. I’m going back to reblogging pictures of animals, beautiful women, awesome nature scenes, and user-made graphics from my respective fandoms (including the mostly white cast of THG) now. Feel free to keep whining about a cast that has already made MILLIONS with these movies. I’m sure they’re all real concerned about your opinions.

(Edited side note: The Hunger Games is NOT about the oppression of POC. If you notice, there were plenty of POC in the capitol. The Hunger Games is about the oppression of ALL people, and the rebellion that should ensue when we have our liberties taken away from us. It is, in it’s own way, a political statement about abuse of power. IT HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH RACE. STOP TWISTING IT INTO SOMETHING IT IS NOT. Also, yes, some of the other nameless tributes could, and possibly should have been POC, but the fact of the matter is, we have no idea why those particular people were chosen and there is nothing we can do to change the movie now that it has been made and released.) 

I don’t even know how to deal with this kind of bullshit in my tags anymore.

Suzanne said that they were mixed. She said that there has been ethnic mixing in the Seam and District 12. You know what she also said? She said that they can use makeup to show that ethnic mixing. That is blackface. This is not a woman to trust with racial affairs especially considering that she is white and thus privileged. [x]

Moreover, authorial intent is moot when interpreting a text. It is fucking moot. The text tells us that Katniss is a woman of color, what Collins says outside of the text to the otherwise does not matter.

Uncommon for PoC of gray eyes to exist, you say? Go to the Middle East. Go to Afghanistan and see the Pashtun people. Go to Turkey. Look at any light-skinned Latin@—or even medium to dark skinned for that matter—peoples and see how diverse their features are. The idea of PoC being solely dark-skinnned, dark-haired, dark-eyed people comes from a place of ignorance and inexperience with PoC themselves.

“The Hunger Games is NOT about the oppression of POC.” Delete your blog. Delete it now. District 11 serves as a metaphor for slavery. The people there are canonically black, canonically African American. They work in the fields. They work under merciless conditions. They are subjected to punishments of historical weight such as whipping. They are victim to police brutality. Moreover, there are unmistakable patterns of color in the books. Gale and Thresh are compared in text to each other in the first book. There’s a sense of owing respective to the Seam that the District 11 tributes also understand. Seeder who is explicitly African American is described as having the same olive skin as people of the Seam, so much so that she could fit in the Seam. Haymitch and Chaff are best friends. As a matter of fact, Haymitch introduces Katniss foremost to Chaff and Seeder in Catching Fire.

Now let’s go to District 12 itself. There’s a racial disparity there between merchants and miners. Only poverty, you say? Then why the fuck is it reinforced by physical appearance? Why the fuck do Prim and her mother look out of place in the Seam with their—get this—blonde hair and blue eyes, the whitest features that anybody could have? The racial narrative is fucking blatant. Stop trying to deny it.

You live in Appalachia and you think that no PoC would move there of their free will? You make me laugh. Since when did any of the characters in The Hunger Games have free will as to where they can move? They can’t leave their districts. They can’t travel between districts upon penalty of beng shot. The fact that District 11 and District 12 are so near each other only proves that PoC were grouped into specific districts, hence the institutional racism.

Moreover, you really may not know much aout the region in which you live because Melungeon Native Americans live in Appalachia.  They have even mixed withe people of European descent. From Wikipedia

[Melungeon] is a term traditionally applied to one of a number of “tri-racial isolate” groups of the Southeastern United States, mainly in the Cumberland Gap area of central Appalachia, which includes portions of East TennesseeSouthwest Virginia, and East KentuckyTri-racial describes populations thought to be of mixed Europeansub-Saharan African and Native American ancestry. Although there is no consensus on how many such groups exist, estimates range as high as 200.[1][2] Melungeons were often referred to as of Portuguese or Native American origin. [x]

This ethnic mixing that is so outrageous and far-fetched to you has already occurred!

Are there PoC in the Capitol? Perhaps. Most of the Capitol residents are racially ambiguous and some explicitly white. I odn’t knwo where you’re getting your information from. It’s certainly not from the books. Most Capitol residents have Roman names. People in District 2 have Greek names. European culture pervades their societies and is a reference to the Capitol’s gladiatorial Hunger Games and Two’s Spartan warlike culture.

In short, people of color exist. They exist in these books. There’s an undeniable racial narrative in these books. Katniss is not ambiguous. She sure as fuck is not white. The only person who is twisting the text is you with half-assed and superficial arguments.

And you know what’s really sad? No, the filmmakers are NOT concerned with our opinions. They never will be. Whitewashing is excruciatingly commonplace in Hollywood. It’s no big deal for them. Whenever I meet a person who has seen the film, they have no idea that Katniss and Co. were PoC. The only place where I can discuss this is on blogging websites and in fandom. We are sick and tired of your derailing bullshit and don’t need it anymore. I went into my Haymitch tag to find stuff for my fyeah. I had no fucking idea that I would have to spend so much time replying to this bullshit post.

Reblogged from gloryandus  388 notes

gloryandus:

The fact remains that Panem is a futuristic North America. North America is currently only 57% white, with that percentage decreasing. There is absolutely no reason to make a leap and believe that Panem has more white people than we do now. If anything, looking at scientific population projections there would be less. Suzanne Collins did not need to spell this out for you in the book. It is common knowledge that North America does not equal the USA alone, and that it is the most racially diverse continent on earth, with all evidence pointing to it only growing in diversity. 

The Hunger Games films are racist and practice whitewashing because they are an adaptation of a book about a diverse nation of people overwhelmingly of color, featuring a prominently white cast. Imagine, if you will, a book set in Mexico being adapted with a mostly white cast of actors. ‘Well, there are white people in Mexico’ you’d say. Actually, no you wouldn’t, because that’s ridiculous. Of course there is a small white population in Mexico, and a proportionate number of white actors could be included to demonstrate this, but the majority of Mexicans are Latin@, and they would feature in the cast. The same way, North America (and Panem, which -cough includes Mexico cough-) in a couple hundred plus years will be a country made up mostly of diverse people of color. The Hunger Games films should feature mostly people of color, but they don’t. There are still a handful of roles yet to be cast, but as of right now Enobaria will be the only person of color in Mockingjay, and she only has one line in the book.

Really, it’s not surprising. Hollywood does this. A lot. That doesn’t make it excusable, though. The fact that it’s such a common occurrence makes it even more despicable, and I will keep speaking out about it.

Maria Howell cast as Seeder!

chelseabigbang:

So Maria Howell has been cast as Seeder in Catching Fire and I’m so glad there was no whitewashing, but this makes me side-eye a little bit because remember when Katniss was described as being olive-skinned and everyone said that just meant she had a tan or some shit?

Seeder was described the same way  and Katniss said she “looks almost like she could be from the Seam with her olive skin and straight black hair streaked with silver”.  Of course Seeder is from District 11, the District that has been presented as being heavily populated by black people.  But I mean…doesn’t this mean something?

Doesn’t this denote that Seeder and Katniss are of - or close to - the same coloring?

Is anyone else realizing this?

Is anyone else?

Am I the only one?

I can’t be. 

That being said, JLaw is Katniss so there’s no changing that but I think it’s interesting that olive skin means POC for a minor character but when referring to the main character, it means white+makeup. 

No, you’re not the only one.   Straight up, the production is cool with casting actors of color in these films—as long as they play supporting role PoCs who die to benefit the white protagonists.

Reblogged from unsuspectingfish  342 notes

robogreifer:

I’m sorry, but I won’t ever forgive the decision to edit Peeta’s amputation out of the movie.

there-was-a-girl:aimmyarrowshigh:stillwannabefree said:

The fact that they removed Peeta’s amputation from the story AND removed both Greasy Sae’s granddaughter and the D10 Tribute’s clubfoot from the film gives Panem an unrealistic level of able-bodiedness (especially for a dystopian/third-world country) AND creates a narrative that actively asserts that people with physical disabilities are not suitable for mainstream viewing. 

Their exclusion from the story is problematic from both a narrative standpoint — that Peeta is intentionally given a physical disability and Katniss given a psychological disorder, and they’re still both able to be romantically and sexually engaged AND retain full personal agency — and a “real-world” standpoint, in that it would have been (making a slight pun) revolutionary for them to include a love interest with a physical disability in Catching Fire and Mockingjay, given that the general culture of US media is that people with disabilities need either to be wholly tragic or wholly “inspirational meta stories,” but never just… people.

…why? I’m thinking they didn’t do it out of disrespect to the source but because they are filming at least 3 more movies and it’s more convinent and cheaper. Now Josh won’t have to wear a green screen legwarmer type thing and they save money on CGI.

The “we marginalize people with disabilities and representations of them because it’s more convenient and cheaper” defense is kind of mindboggling and indicative of a lot of the ableism our society has internalized. The “more convenient and cheaper” for the rest of us excuse has been used for generations to justify discriminating against, excluding, and even denying basic human rights to people with disabilities…to the extent that laws like the Americans with Disabilities Act and Employment Discrimination Act are designed to intervene.

Also, it’s kind of difficult to argue that the same movie production that made CGI fireballs, mutant wolves, and the fanciest of facial hairs couldn’t cough up the money or talent for the illusion of a physical disability that would mostly have been hidden under a pants leg anyway.

1 out of 5 Americans have a disability. This is definitely not reflected in entertainment media. Though, given The Hunger Games film’s track record of exclusion it is not that unexpected.

Reblogged from chonklatime  189 notes

madeoflightning:

Can everyone stop talking about Katniss being ‘white-washed’? Good lord, White people can be ‘olive-skinned’ too you know.

chonklatime:

Y’know what?  When Hollywood starts opening up leading roles to POC, when casting calls stop requesting people who are, “Nice looking, friendly, Not too dark, when mixed race individuals can be mixed in the movies and not be shoved into one category or the other, when metropolitan areas like New York and Los Angeles are no longer depicted as being overwhelmingly white when they’re overwhelmingly NOT, and when any kid, regardless of race, can go to the movies and actually see themselves on the screen?  THEN I’ll stop talking about white-washing.

Reblogged from hamiltonkitty  171 notes

Pretty Upset About Rue and Thresh

hamiltonkitty:

racebending:

joamette:

Hmm…I think that, in some ways, the ‘magical negro’ trope isn’t so much the result of stereoyping, btu the inevitable result of POC being cast in supporting roles.

In most story structures, every event relates back to the main character and the main plot.  Other characters are defined by their relation to the protagonist: the love interest, the mentor, the rival, the best friend. This is unavoidable. Good writers should create characters that are rich and complex, but a secondary character can’t go off and do their own thing in the middle of the protagonist’s story.  Their motivations, goals, etc. must be played down for the sake of keeping focus. Their relationship to the protagonist will almost always be their most important relationship.

  So, what do you do if you want to add a black character to a story for ‘diversity’, but you don’t want to make them the main character or love interest? And you don’t want to make them the antagonist, either, because you don’t want to be racist? You shove them into the role of helper to the white protagonist, like the sassy black girlfriend, or the wise black mentor.

In my view, the problem isn’t that there is something inherently wrong with a black secondary character existing to aide a white protagonist. Many if not most secondary characters who are ‘good’ earn their place in the plot through assisting the protagonist and existing as a foil for the primary story line.  The problem is that black characters are constantly thrown into these roles for the sake of ‘diversity’, but rarely get their own stories, where, perhaps, a white person is playing the wise mentor or best friend  They’re always assigned to the secondary, support position.

bolded for emphasis

Reblogged from shesawtheblog  171 notes

Pretty Upset About Rue and Thresh

joamette:

Alright, here Tumblr, it’s my turn to wank about The Hunger Games after having just read the whole first book yesterday.If you haven’t read it already, expect spoilers, or for some things not to make sense to you.

I’m pretty upset about the characters Rue and Thresh. No, I’m not one of the assholes from Twitter with panties all in a twist over the fact that they are being played by black actors. Of course they are being played by black actors - the characters are black in the book, being described as having “dark brown skin” and “dark thick hair.”

I’m upset because Rue and Thresh, the only characters in the The Hunger Games who are explicitly described as dark-skinned people, are textbook examples of the Magical Negro trope. Click the link for a brief explanation of what that means if you aren’t familiar with the racist archetype.

First of all, let’s take a look at Rue and the role she plays in THG. She is a slight, pre-teen girl whose strengths are tree-climbing, stealth, and knowledge of edible and medicinal plants. Every single one of her strengths and character traits is tailored to advance Katniss through the plot.

Aside from the initial mentions establishing her existence and foreshadowing her plot importance, Rue’s first true appearance in THG comes at the exact moment that Katniss is stuck in a tree surrounded by enemies, and she only survives the encounter thanks to Rue’s observation about the genetically-altered wasps’ nest above.

A few tracker jacker stings and two-days of venom-induced nightmares later, Katniss encounters Rue again. Rue is designed to be the only character who could possibly sneak up on Katniss and tug at her heart strings. Rue reminds Katniss of her sister Prim, who Katniss loves so much that she volunteered for the Hunger Games in her stead and even accidentally refers to Rue as Prim in her thoughts. Rue also happens to show up equipped the exact medicinal knowledge that Katniss needs to heal the stings, right then and there. These herbs end up serving Katniss’s ends well after Rue is dead.

Another major advancement for Katniss was her destruction of the Career pack’s supply camp, which was made possible only by Rue’s ability to travel quickly and stealthily through the pine forest while lighting the distraction fires. Oh yeah, and the fact that Rue had been spying on their camp and had some invaluable intel to offer on the matter. It also just so happens that Rue knows exactly how to use the one item Katniss is carrying that Katniss doesn’t know how to use: the night-vision glasses.

Basically, one is hard press to name a single thing about Rue that isn’t one-mindedly engineered to advance Katniss. Even her seemingly unique love for music simply harkens back to Katniss’s relationship with her deceased father. Even the little girl’s shy but eager personality just seems tacked on to give us a reason to be sad when she is inevitably killed off.

The way hear death was handled was perhaps the most upsetting thing to me about her treatment: she was killed the instant the plot no longer needed her, not a moment later. To be fair, every character died the moment the plot didn’t need them anymore; however, only Rue’s death was used to develop Katniss’s character. Every other death comes off as incidental.

Which brings me to Thresh, the boy from the same district as Rue. After his introduction, we don’t see hide nor hair of him for practically the whole book until he becomes necessary as a plot device to save Katniss. He literally lunges out of the woods the moment Katniss becomes incapable of saving her own life from Clove, successfully annihilates her assailant, and only stops short of killing Katniss as well because Rue. I don’t even feel like I have to finish that sentence. It is simply because Rue. Next time we hear mention of Thresh, he’s on the body count.

I would also like to point out that the only explicitly dark-skinned characters are from the farming district where whipping is the primary form of punishment, a fact that brings Katniss momentary pause to contemplate her relative good-fortune in relation to these people (which smacks of white guilt or something like it).

I’m bad at writing conclusions, but this is Tumblr, not the academy, so whatever. That is basically what I read, and it super bums me out.

Is the impact of the Magical Negro stereotype mitigated if Katniss is read as biracial or as a woman of color? Would the fixation on the races of the actors or on the characters have been lessened if The Hunger Games had more diversity in its main characters as a whole? Do you think Suzanne Collins was aware of the Magical Negro stereotype—or the implications of a character of color dying to drive a white character’s story forward—as she wrote these scenes in The Hunger Games?

Reblogged from mermaidheartsongs  559 notes

should be Caucasian, between ages 15 and 20, who could portray someone ‘underfed but strong,’ and ‘naturally pretty underneath her tomboyishness.’

By

Just a reminder that casting directors asked only white people to apply for the role of Katniss Everdeen. A role of an “olive-skinned” woman, “caucasian” or otherwise. (via feministfilm)

Oh for the love of god. Of course they did.

(via suzy-x)

Ugh. See, I loved Jennifer Lawrence in the role, but the fact that they phrased the casting call this way is horrible and another example of Hollywood being stupid and racist.

(via iaquariuschicken)

I’m trying to figure out how insulated one has to be from the wider world to be shocked! shocked! that racism is pervasive in American culture, and among American teens. Those wide-eyed tweets about Rue’s death being less sad because she’s black clearly come straight from the brains of adolescents (nearly all of them white, presumably) who have bathed in subtly and overtly racist culture since birth, absorbed far too much of it, and not yet learned to second-guess or even censor themselves when they parrot its tenets. They’re surprising only if you haven’t noticed that when real people of color are killed, there’s always an immediate attempt to justify or downplay the deaths. Art imitates life; reactions to art likewise imitate life.

By An article at Publisher’s Weekly on fans’ racist reactions to learning that Rue is black. The article also gives a shout-out to Racebending.com