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Reblogged from scifigamingmom  3,884 notes

scifigamingmom:

lookatthisfuckingoppressor:

thankyoucorndog:

My favorite thing in the world is when people complain about lack of representation—and rightly so—and some person responds with a snarky photo of one character. One character.

Boy, you sure showed us all the representation we need. You’re so right. I applaud your drive and initiative.

"My show’s protagonist has a black friend!"

Or the shows hint at representation, without actually showing it, which allows the privileged fans to maliciously fetishize said fake representation.

Reblogged from castleramblings  253 notes

caskettdensi:

jazzypom:

a-mead-gal:

squeelokitty:

You know that the actress of May (Ming-Na) is Chinese? Don’t see racism everywhere, that’s kind of sad. It’s Whedon! No “whitewashing” here.

Uh, yeah, that’s why I said five of the six main cast are white or pass for white (Chloe passes, May is Chinese). 

Let’s look at some stats of prior Whedon shows…

Buffy: no PoC regular characters till the last season (you could argue for Charisma Carpenter, however)

Angel: one (Gunn), arguably two (Charisma Carpenter is mixed race), then later on Gina Torres 

Firefly: three out of nine

Dollhouse: two out of seven (arguably three, as Tahmoh Penikett is also mixed race)

It’s a better track record than some, but it’s not spectacular. 

And as for “seeing racism everywhere” - my biggest problem is not that the main cast is mostly white, but that the main cast is white while the bad guys are not. The main cast casting may not be racist - but that is. 

PROTIP: wanna know why people see racism everywhere? IT’S EVERYWHERE

Yeah, actually. After the episode with Scorch (and the woc who lead him to his demise), the episode reminded me a comment the casting director of Sleepy Hollow made. They said that the reason why they cast a lot of poc on the show was to avoid the problem that a lot of shows find themselves in. They’d cast the show white - and then the network would be all, “You need a diverse cast!” and their nod to this would be either a ‘token’ member of a team from another race. Or, if they had a bad guy on that had to be killed off, you got an actor that was poc. 

The powers that be at Sleepy Hollow tried to avoid being in a position where all the lead characters were white and then when the characters needed an antagonist it wouldn’t be a person of colour (to tick the boxes of diversity and big bad). Agents of Shield falls into the trap that the Sleepy Hollow people try to avoid.

It’s ironic, because Joss Whedon co opted Junot Diaz’s quote about lack of representation and monsters- and for Whedon it stops at him writing Black Widow (a white heroine) in a Marvel movie.

Alongside the clunky writing and wooden acting, the lack of diversity on Agents of SHIELD is one reason I’ve stopped watching.

Interesting that Sleepy Hollow is brought up. While not to my tastes as a show, Fox are doing some interesting regarding diversity and their shows.

Any fan who uses “It’s Whedon!” to dismiss fellow fandom concerns about diversity in the Whedonverse needs to take a much closer look at his previous body of work and the current work being reflected on Agents of SHIELD.   The person-of-color antagonist/victim of the week shtick is getting really old (and the one episode where the antagonist of the week was not a person of color, they still managed to stereotype the country of Malta.)   And it’s not that SHIELD should only be facing off against white people or rescuing white people—go diverse side characters and PoC villains—it’s the contrast between who gets to be a hero, who gets to be a series regular (and who gets to be the recipient of SHIELD’s benevolent martial services) that makes it cringe worthy.

It’s hard to reconcile the stuff Whedon says about feminism and diversity (quoting Junot Diaz, no less) with what his work shows us.  His work doesn’t match his words, and it’s painful to acknowledge that.

(FOX ignored a lot of Asian American outcry about Dads this season and aired Firefly without noticing the whitewashing, too…)

[Image: A Firefly/Serenity merchandise travel poster featuring an a woman with heavy eye makeup hiding her face behind a silk fan, with a dragon and Asian architecture in the background.  The poster reads “Experience the Beauty of Shinon” with traditional Chinese [approximate translation: “experience the radiance of the ocean”] underneath.]

Shouldn’t it be a priority, if you’re trying to tell a believable story about a Sino-American future, to include Asian characters?
Isn’t it marginalizing to fantasize about a “mixed Asian” world completely absent of Asian people, especially when you live and work in a city that’s almost 1/8th Asian?
If you were to write a scifi show about a merged African and North American empire, do you think it would be acceptable to avoid giving a single spoken line to a black actor?
Would you ever tell a story that purported to have major elements of American gay culture, without having a single gay  character in-frame for more than 3 seconds? What about a show that claimed some feminist themes, but cast only men, with women barely seen and never heard?

At San Diego Comic-Con International 2012, a Racebending.com staffer asked Joss Whedon about having (and casting) Asian or Asian American characters in Firefly.  Learn more at our website:  Frustrations of an Asian American Whedonite.

[Image: A Firefly/Serenity merchandise travel poster featuring an a woman with heavy eye makeup hiding her face behind a silk fan, with a dragon and Asian architecture in the background.  The poster reads “Experience the Beauty of Shinon” with traditional Chinese [approximate translation: “experience the radiance of the ocean”] underneath.]

Shouldn’t it be a priority, if you’re trying to tell a believable story about a Sino-American future, to include Asian characters?

Isn’t it marginalizing to fantasize about a “mixed Asian” world completely absent of Asian people, especially when you live and work in a city that’s almost 1/8th Asian?

If you were to write a scifi show about a merged African and North American empire, do you think it would be acceptable to avoid giving a single spoken line to a black actor?

Would you ever tell a story that purported to have major elements of American gay culture, without having a single gay  character in-frame for more than 3 seconds? What about a show that claimed some feminist themes, but cast only men, with women barely seen and never heard?

At San Diego Comic-Con International 2012, a Racebending.com staffer asked Joss Whedon about having (and casting) Asian or Asian American characters in Firefly.  Learn more at our website:  Frustrations of an Asian American Whedonite.

Reblogged from racialicious  260 notes

My question was as follows:

“One of the things I loved about Firefly was the exploration of the fusion of Asian and American cultures. Many Asian Americans go through a similar journey. I was wondering, if you were to explore that again in the future, if you would be willing to include Asian or Asian American performers?”

If you’re surprised by my question, go back and watch Firefly again. Or read this xkcd comic, because Randall Munroe is apparently working on a relevant xkcd for every possible topic in the world, like Wikipedia in webcomic form. I’ve watched the show several times and I’m fairly certain that there isn’t more than 15 seconds of footage with an Asian person on screen.

We’re virtually faceless, and completely voiceless, in a universe that is supposed to represent a Sino-American future.

And the answer was:

“Yeah, absolutely. It’s not a mission statement, in terms of who I’m casting for a particular thing. It was a mission statement of the show to say that cultures inevitably blend, even if it happens through conquest and violence.”

This was a very nice, neutral answer. Joss gave a genuine, heartfelt response, and I appreciate that.

But the answer still frustrated. Because it was clear that the notion of cultural integration was more important than the practice. That the grand vision of a mixed Asian/American tomorrow was more important than the inclusion of Asian faces and voices today.

I wanted to grab the mic again.

Here we see the intersection of both gendered and racial representation in media. Joss holds one to be a dear cause, to be integrated into the themes and characters of his stories.

The other? Does not register as a priority.

By Mike Le, “Frustrations Of An Asian American Whedonite,” Racebending 7/17/12. (via racialicious)