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Reblogged from traciglee  518 notes
traciglee:


“The country needs a health care system that reflects its own diversity,” says Dr. Myiesha Taylor, an emergency physician based in Dallas. “You’d be surprised how many people still think ‘doctor’ means ‘old white guy.’ If we can build on what Doc McStuffins is doing, the next generation of patients will have a different view of the medical profession, and so will children of color.”

Learn a little more about Disney’s Doc McStuffins in this adorable and inspiring feature by my colleague, Geoff!

traciglee:

“The country needs a health care system that reflects its own diversity,” says Dr. Myiesha Taylor, an emergency physician based in Dallas. “You’d be surprised how many people still think ‘doctor’ means ‘old white guy.’ If we can build on what Doc McStuffins is doing, the next generation of patients will have a different view of the medical profession, and so will children of color.”

Learn a little more about Disney’s Doc McStuffins in this adorable and inspiring feature by my colleague, Geoff!

Black women doctors show appreciation for Doc McStuffins!

We have written a couple of entries in our blog about why we love Disney’s Doc McStuffins.  We have discussed how we believe that this program featuring a little African American girl and her family is crucial to changing the future of this nation.
We also started a campaign to express our thanks to Disney and Brown Bag Films for creating, producing and airing Doc McStuffins.  What started out as a simple collage of a few African American women physicians expressing thanks to Disney and Brown Bag Films has now taken on a life of its own.  When we first started the collage we never thought we would get anywhere close to the current number of physicians who have agreed to lend their image to this project.  But here we stand today with what we believe may be one of the most moving visual images of African American women in some time.
Our latest version of the We Are Doc McStuffins collage is made up 131 African American women physicians from around the world.  They represent physicians from Neurosurgery, Pediatrics, Pediatric Anesthesiology, Ob/gyn, Cardiothoracic surgery, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Orthopedic Surgery, Occupational Medicine, Emergency medicine, Internal medicine, Family medicine, Dermatology, Cardiology (Electrophysiology), Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Neuro-otology , Otolaryngology (ENT), Sports Medicine , Urgent Care, Pediatric Hospitalist, Geriatrics , Medical Oncology, Infectious disease, Preventive Medicine, Allergy & Immunology, Naturopathic medicine, Pediatric Emergency medicine, Physical Medicine & Rehab (PM&R), Naturopathic endocrine/oncology, Urogynecology & Reconstructive Pelvic surgery, Maternal Fetal Medicine, Transplant surgery, Internal medicine hospitalist, General Surgery, Med/peds, Nephrology, Podiatry, Psychiatry and Public Health/Community medicine.
These strong women are graduates of some of our nation’s most prestigious institutions of higher education.  The list includes Johns Hopkins, Harvard, Brown, Stanford, MIT, Xavier University of Louisiana, UC Berkeley, UCSF, Univ of Pennsylvania, Columbia, USC, UCLA, Princeton, Purdue, Yale, Duke, Georgetown, Emory, Howard, Morehouse, Baylor, Case Western, University of Arkansas, University of Washington, Temple, SW College of Naturopathic Medicine, UT Houston, UT Austin, UNT Health Science Center, Spelman College and the University of Alabama.  A special note is that 44 of these great physicians are products of America’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities.
These amazing women are providing healthcare in every major US city, plus South Africa, France, the Caribbean and Italy!  We are trailblazers.  We are women of color. We are physicians.  We ARE role-models.  We are Doc McStuffins all grown up!

Black women doctors show appreciation for Doc McStuffins!

We have written a couple of entries in our blog about why we love Disney’s Doc McStuffins.  We have discussed how we believe that this program featuring a little African American girl and her family is crucial to changing the future of this nation.

We also started a campaign to express our thanks to Disney and Brown Bag Films for creating, producing and airing Doc McStuffins.  What started out as a simple collage of a few African American women physicians expressing thanks to Disney and Brown Bag Films has now taken on a life of its own.  When we first started the collage we never thought we would get anywhere close to the current number of physicians who have agreed to lend their image to this project.  But here we stand today with what we believe may be one of the most moving visual images of African American women in some time.

Our latest version of the We Are Doc McStuffins collage is made up 131 African American women physicians from around the world.  They represent physicians from Neurosurgery, Pediatrics, Pediatric Anesthesiology, Ob/gyn, Cardiothoracic surgery, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Orthopedic Surgery, Occupational Medicine, Emergency medicine, Internal medicine, Family medicine, Dermatology, Cardiology (Electrophysiology), Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Neuro-otology , Otolaryngology (ENT), Sports Medicine , Urgent Care, Pediatric Hospitalist, Geriatrics , Medical Oncology, Infectious disease, Preventive Medicine, Allergy & Immunology, Naturopathic medicine, Pediatric Emergency medicine, Physical Medicine & Rehab (PM&R), Naturopathic endocrine/oncology, Urogynecology & Reconstructive Pelvic surgery, Maternal Fetal Medicine, Transplant surgery, Internal medicine hospitalist, General Surgery, Med/peds, Nephrology, Podiatry, Psychiatry and Public Health/Community medicine.

These strong women are graduates of some of our nation’s most prestigious institutions of higher education.  The list includes Johns Hopkins, Harvard, Brown, Stanford, MIT, Xavier University of Louisiana, UC Berkeley, UCSF, Univ of Pennsylvania, Columbia, USC, UCLA, Princeton, Purdue, Yale, Duke, Georgetown, Emory, Howard, Morehouse, Baylor, Case Western, University of Arkansas, University of Washington, Temple, SW College of Naturopathic Medicine, UT Houston, UT Austin, UNT Health Science Center, Spelman College and the University of Alabama.  A special note is that 44 of these great physicians are products of America’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

These amazing women are providing healthcare in every major US city, plus South Africa, France, the Caribbean and Italy!  We are trailblazers.  We are women of color. We are physicians.  We ARE role-models.  We are Doc McStuffins all grown up!

Kiara Muhammad is the young voice actress of the titular character in the Disney show Doc McStuffins, which is the top rated cable show for kids in the 2 to 5 year old demographic.  

(This means that alongside The Legend of Korra, which took top ratings in kid and teen demographics, lead girl characters of color are rocking this year!   Additional credit to Disney, too, for casting an actress of color to voice the lead role behind the scenes!)

Reblogged from feministdisney  947 notes

Doc McStuffins: A positive step for Disney

feministdisney:

Came across an interesting article today, and since it’s late I’m just going to really recommend you read it (it has a lot about the show and background info as well) and I’ll include a lot of quotes from the article.  It seems especially relevant in light of how much race discussion has gone on here recently.

 Disney has worked overtime in recent years to leave that past behind, and a surprising groundswell of support from black viewers for a new TV cartoon called “Doc McStuffins” is the latest indication that its efforts may be paying off.

Aimed at preschoolers, “Doc McStuffins” centers on its title character, a 6-year-old African-American girl. Her mother is a doctor (Dad stays home and tends the garden), and the girl emulates her by opening a clinic for dolls and stuffed animals. “I haven’t lost a toy yet,” she says sweetly to a sick dinosaur in one episode.

It truly warmed my heart and almost brought tears to my eyes when my 8-year-old, Mikaela, saw ‘Doc McStuffins’ for the first time and said, ‘Wow, mommy — she’s brown,’ ” Kia Morgan Smith, an Atlanta mother of five, wrote on her blogCincomom.com. Myiesha Taylor, a Dallas doctor who blogs at CoilyEmbrace.com, took her praise a step further, writing, “This program featuring a little African-American girl and her family is crucial to changing the future of this nation.”       

Despite a surge in multicultural cartoons, like Nickelodeon’s “Ni Hao, Kai-Lan,” designed to introduce Mandarin vocabulary words to preschoolers, and 40 years after Bill Cosby’s “Fat Albert,” black cartoon characters in leading roles are still rare. It’s considered an on-screen risk to make your main character a member of a minority, even in this post-“Dora the Explorer” age. Networks want to attract the broadest possible audience, but the real peril is in the toy aisle. From a business perspective, Disney and its rivals ultimately make most of these shows in the hope that they spawn mass-appeal toy lines. White dolls are the proven formula.        

 Chris Nee, who created “Doc McStuffins,” said, “Disney, to its complete credit, looked at my pitch and suggested that we make the characters African-American.” Her original Doc McStuffins was a little white girl.

Okay, I will give credit where credit it due.   Props to Disney for actually thinking about things and not just making her another white girl character.

Gary Marsh, the president and chief creative officer of Disney Channels Worldwide, said “Doc McStuffins” reflects a type of hypersensitivity to the power of television on young viewers. “What we put on TV can change how kids see the world, and that is a responsibility that I take very seriously,” he said. “By showcasing different role models and different kinds of families we can positively influence sociological dynamics for the next 20 years.”

That is honestly a great thing to say, you know?   It’s so doubly aggravating that so many Disney fans argue over this- look!   This dude is in charge of a bunch of Disney stuff and even he is getting the point here!   It makes me hopeful.   Hopefully: he means it.

the series has attracted a surprisingly large following among boys — and related merchandise is already selling briskly.

Sad ending line though… does it have to be surprising that boys like it, just because it features a lead girl character?? Oh gender binary…  C’est la vie.