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Who would you want to see on a panel discussing women superheroes?

We’re putting together a panel for San Diego ComicCon 2014!   Right now we’re envisioning a panel focused on women superheroes and aiming for an all-women panel!    What we definitely want is a lot of intersectionality on the panel— particularly women of color and women who hold multiple intersectional identities!  Women who write novels or comics or webcomics about superheroines!  Women who study transmedia and the depiction of superheroes!  Women who provide cultural commentary on comics and media representation!

This is where we’d love your help!  What would your dream panel on this topic look like?   Who should we invite and who would you like to see?

Racebending is proud to announce that we will be hosting our first Midwest panel discussion on media representation in comics, Diverse Means for Diverse Worlds at this years C2E2 in Chicago! 
The panel is focused on art and storytelling techniques in comics that allow fantasy worlds to mirror real world diversity. It is presented by an equally diverse roster of panelists whose own work and experience range from webcomics to running comics conventions. The panel presentation will be held on April 27th from 2:45-3:45 in panel room S402 at Chicago’s McCormick Place Convention Center.  Panelists include Gail Simone, Turtel Onli, Gene Ha, Jay Fuller, Ramon K. Perez, and Marjorie M. Liu with moderator Gabe Canada.
About Racebending.com
Racebending.com is an international grassroots organization of media consumers who support entertainment equality. We advocate for underrepresented groups in entertainment media. Since our formation in 2009, we have been dedicated to furthering equal opportunities in Hollywood and beyond.
This website was founded by fans of Avatar: The Last Airbender who were appalled by the casting discrimination that occurred during the production of the The Last Airbender film adaptation. We are now comprised of thousands of supporters in 50 countries around the world. We are a coalition and community dedicated to encouraging fair representation in the media. As a far-reaching movement of media consumers, students, parents, and professionals, we promote just and equal opportunities in the entertainment industry.
About C2E2
The Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo - also known as C2E2 - is a convention spanning the latest and greatest from the worlds of comics, movies, television, toys, anime, manga and video games. Bringing the best of popular culture to Downtown Chicago, C2E2’s show floor is packed with hundreds of exhibitors, panels and autograph sessions giving fans a chance to interact with their favorite creators and screening rooms featuring sneak peeks at films and television shows months before they hit either the big or small screen!

Racebending is proud to announce that we will be hosting our first Midwest panel discussion on media representation in comics, Diverse Means for Diverse Worlds at this years C2E2 in Chicago!

The panel is focused on art and storytelling techniques in comics that allow fantasy worlds to mirror real world diversity. It is presented by an equally diverse roster of panelists whose own work and experience range from webcomics to running comics conventions. The panel presentation will be held on April 27th from 2:45-3:45 in panel room S402 at Chicago’s McCormick Place Convention Center.  Panelists include Gail Simone, Turtel Onli, Gene Ha, Jay Fuller, Ramon K. Perez, and Marjorie M. Liu with moderator Gabe Canada.

About Racebending.com

Racebending.com is an international grassroots organization of media consumers who support entertainment equality. We advocate for underrepresented groups in entertainment media. Since our formation in 2009, we have been dedicated to furthering equal opportunities in Hollywood and beyond.

This website was founded by fans of Avatar: The Last Airbender who were appalled by the casting discrimination that occurred during the production of the The Last Airbender film adaptation. We are now comprised of thousands of supporters in 50 countries around the world. We are a coalition and community dedicated to encouraging fair representation in the media. As a far-reaching movement of media consumers, students, parents, and professionals, we promote just and equal opportunities in the entertainment industry.

About C2E2

The Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo - also known as C2E2 - is a convention spanning the latest and greatest from the worlds of comics, movies, television, toys, anime, manga and video games. Bringing the best of popular culture to Downtown Chicago, C2E2’s show floor is packed with hundreds of exhibitors, panels and autograph sessions giving fans a chance to interact with their favorite creators and screening rooms featuring sneak peeks at films and television shows months before they hit either the big or small screen!

Reblogged from fatpinkcast  831 notes
fatpinkcast:


With one exception over the course of four decades, HBO has not aired an original one-hour drama series created by a woman.
With one exception over the course of four decades, HBO has not aired an original one-hour drama or dramatic miniseries creatively led at its debut by a person of color. That exception is more than 21 years old (see below for more details).
Just under 8 percent of HBO’s original dramas and miniseries came from women, and 2.6 percent came from people of color. Less than 5 percent of its one-hour dramas — one of the most high-profile entertainment products in the world — were created by women. That’s over the course of nearly 40 years.

Read more at the Huffington Post:  Who Creates Drama At HBO? Very Few Women Or People Of Color

fatpinkcast:

With one exception over the course of four decades, HBO has not aired an original one-hour drama series created by a woman.

With one exception over the course of four decades, HBO has not aired an original one-hour drama or dramatic miniseries creatively led at its debut by a person of color. That exception is more than 21 years old (see below for more details).

Just under 8 percent of HBO’s original dramas and miniseries came from women, and 2.6 percent came from people of color. Less than 5 percent of its one-hour dramas — one of the most high-profile entertainment products in the world — were created by women. That’s over the course of nearly 40 years.

Read more at the Huffington Post:  Who Creates Drama At HBO? Very Few Women Or People Of Color


Even as a snapshot of the industry, however, the numbers tell a clear story about who gets the keys to the fanciest car, culturally speaking. At the outlets responsible for many top programs, women and people of color are enormously under-represented as creators. If one focuses only on the last dozen years at AMC, FX, Showtime, Netflix and HBO, around 12 percent of the creators and narrative architects in the dramatic realm were women.
According to theWomen’s Media Center, “Shows with no women creators had casts that were 41 percent female. Shows with at least one female creator had casts that were 47 percent female.” Given how few women and people of color are present at a show’s creation, is it any wonder we can’t escape this debate?
And so we find ourselves in one of those closed loops that “True Detective’s” Rust Cohle described in one of his most memorable philosophical digressions. We go around and around, talking about individual characters and the missteps of particular shows. We wonder why women are too often depicted as nags, flunkies or side salads. We wonder why women often get less to do, have less to say and so often feel the impulse to take off their shirts. We wonder why people of color aren’t often depicted with compelling emotional lives or as complicated characters. We wonder why non-white men and women are hardly ever the protagonists.

Read more at the Huffington Post.

Even as a snapshot of the industry, however, the numbers tell a clear story about who gets the keys to the fanciest car, culturally speaking. At the outlets responsible for many top programs, women and people of color are enormously under-represented as creators. If one focuses only on the last dozen years at AMC, FX, Showtime, Netflix and HBO, around 12 percent of the creators and narrative architects in the dramatic realm were women.

According to theWomen’s Media Center, “Shows with no women creators had casts that were 41 percent female. Shows with at least one female creator had casts that were 47 percent female.” Given how few women and people of color are present at a show’s creation, is it any wonder we can’t escape this debate?

And so we find ourselves in one of those closed loops that “True Detective’s” Rust Cohle described in one of his most memorable philosophical digressions. We go around and around, talking about individual characters and the missteps of particular shows. We wonder why women are too often depicted as nags, flunkies or side salads. We wonder why women often get less to do, have less to say and so often feel the impulse to take off their shirts. We wonder why people of color aren’t often depicted with compelling emotional lives or as complicated characters. We wonder why non-white men and women are hardly ever the protagonists.

Read more at the Huffington Post.

There were the innocuous comments like Does his race really matter?” and “Who cares about his skin color? It’s his character that’s important!” Wonderful sentiments each, but ultimately if benignly ignorant of the social scaffolding that still places non-white characters at a disadvantage in mainstream media, as well as the need for representation among an audience filled with often overlooked people of color.

Worse, however, were the accusatory and the insulting: “You’re just projecting, stop it,” one person said, “Star Wars doesn’t need your PC trash” said others in one fashion or another, and “He doesn’t need to be black…“—as though that were the only alternative to being white—”…to be a baddass, people. Go watch Roots and stop trying to take Star Wars from white people.” was the response of one all too memorable commentator on Facebook which I had the personal displeasure to witness.

So, you see, when fans turn to people like [Lucasfilm VIP Pablo] Hidalgo, many aren’t just hoping for answers, they were hoping for a shield. They wanted to hear that it wasn’t just all in their heads, that they weren’t projecting. They wanted to hear that there was actually someone who represented them in this new series, and that they wouldn’t need to squint and tilt their heads to see themselves in a new Star Wars hero. They wanted to stand up proudly in the fandom and assert their feelings without fearing venom and fire for daring to think that a man of color could lead a Star Wars show.

By

Mia Moretti on the new lead characters of color announced for Star Wars: Rebels.   “Rebels, Kanan Jarrus, and the race factor” from Eleven-Thirty Eight.com.

"Wneed protagonists like Sabine. We need a powerful young Asian woman to stand for the oft-neglected Asian women in the vast and diverse Star Wars audience. To light a new fire in the hearts of young Asian children, and little girls of all sorts so that we might share Star Wars with them. We need a character who takes us back to the Mandalorians’ roots as an omni-inclusive culture of soldiers after the singularly white, nordic group The Clone Wars brought to television viewers. And we need a protagonist like Kanan, a strong man of color in whose heroics a wide range of fans can see a reflection of themselves. We need a character that can inspire fresh awe in young boys of color, someone who can show them that they too can be the heroes of a galaxy far, far away.”

Lee & Low Books continues to create infographics focusing on diversity in media representation.  This one focuses on the Academy Awards from 1927 to 2012.   The researchers reviewed the 85 year old history of the institution and call the results “staggeringly disappointing.”

Since the Academy Awards was founded 85-years ago:
Only one woman of color (1%) has ever won the Academy Award for Best Actress
Only six men of color (7%) have ever won the Academy Award for Best Actor
Only one woman (1%) has ever won the Academy Award for Best Director

Check out more commentary from the researchers and an interview with filmmakers of color at their website!

Lee & Low Books continues to create infographics focusing on diversity in media representation.  This one focuses on the Academy Awards from 1927 to 2012.   The researchers reviewed the 85 year old history of the institution and call the results “staggeringly disappointing.”

Since the Academy Awards was founded 85-years ago:

  • Only one woman of color (1%) has ever won the Academy Award for Best Actress
  • Only six men of color (7%) have ever won the Academy Award for Best Actor
  • Only one woman (1%) has ever won the Academy Award for Best Director

Check out more commentary from the researchers and an interview with filmmakers of color at their website!

Reblogged from policymic  4,195 notes

policymic:

TV shows and movies with more diversity make more money

TV shows with more ethnically diverse casts actually receive higher ratings, while diverse films make significantly more money: for instance, movies with relatively high onscreen minority involvement (21-30%) posted $160.1 million in global box office receipts in 2011, while those with lower involvement (less than 10%) made just $68.5 million.

Read more

Follow policymic

Reblogged from gradientlair  362 notes

Thoughts About Shonda Rhimes’ DGA Speech On Diversity

gradientlair:

Shonda Rhimes recently won The Diversity Award at The Director’s Guild Awards. According to Entertainment Weekly, she stated that she is "truly profoundly honored to receive this award" but is "also a little pissed off.” This type of dichotomy in response makes sense to me because obviously she doesn’t even want such an award to need to exist but for the industry to simply reflect what is true; the lives of diverse people. Her shows incorporate queer relationships and Black women, people not always seen on every major show. Also, she’s spoken out before on media diversity in terms of race, gender and sexual orientation

Part of her speech included this:

It’s not because of a lack of talent. It’s because of a lack of access. People hire who they know. If it’s been a white boys club for 70 years, that’s a lot of white boys hiring one another. And I don’t believe that that happens out of any specific racism or sexism or prejudice. People hire their friends. They hire who they know. It’s comfortable. You want to be successful, you don’t want to take any chances, you don’t want to rock the boat by hiring people of color because, well, look at us,’ she said. ‘Both Betsy and I like the world that we work in to look like the world that we live in. Different voices make for different visions. Different visions make for something original. Original is what the public is starving for.’

I think this statement is great because it is mostly true. We know of the talent of actors of colour. Much of the public is starving for this excellence. For example, some in the media act perplexed over the success of Sleepy Hollow (not one of Shonda’s shows though) but I would think it would be obvious that such a diverse cast—many of the actors with great resumes and great training—would draw people in. 

However, I do have an issue with the "I don’t believe that that happens out of any specific racism or sexism or prejudice" part of this excerpt from her speech. Though I absolutely adore Shonda Rhimes’ creativity and brilliance, she is incorrect here. It is specific.

There is a history and reasons why Whites’ neighborhoods, schools, networks and eventually friendships remain White. This is not solely about them “coincidentally” preferring White people. The same applies to the media. For example, The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (who awards Oscars) is not “coincidentally” 94% White and 77% male because they’re all “buddies.” That is specificHiring decisions for television writing—what mostly keeps Black people out—is specific. Knowing diverse shows do better than ones that are not diverse and still casting majority or all-White casts is specific.

I understand what she was trying to do here—point out a need without associating serious blame—but the facts are the facts. Sure, personal relationships develop that are homogenous because of the fear of “the other” for Whites and protection from oppressive interpersonal interactions with Whites for Black people and other people of colour. There’s issues of families connecting and shared culture. That makes sense. But in the case of Whites—who structural power affirms—it’s like “friends” are playing poker, but at a table in a house built on structural inequality and institutional racism. 

I want to see media get to the place that Shonda envisions. I really do. But this can occur without separating the history as to why media is the way it is now or without pacifying those who think it’s all a misunderstanding and just about friends doing things for friends.

Are you an actor or actress auditioning for roles on network television? Has your ethnic background, gender or sexual identity affected your ability to land a job? If so, send your story and contact information to: nprcrowdsource@npr.org and we may contact you for an interview.

By NPR wants to interview actors from underrepresented groups about their experiences! Signal boost and share! (It is possible they will do a big story on casting discrimination.)
Reblogged from browngirlsintherain  249 notes

Racebending

browngirlsintherain:

There is so much backlash against racebending characters that are normally seen as being white. But no one ever thinks that the reason why racebending is so appealing for those of us who support it, is because we rarely see ourselves in movies, comic books, literature, etc. And when we do see people like us, the characters are usually one sided or poorly defined. 

The answer to this lack of diversity in the entertainment world would be to introduce more characters who are from minority communities. But that is not happening, is it? Can you name one upcoming superhero film that is going to have a Black, Chinese, Hispanic, Indian, or Native American character as the main lead?

Do you honestly think that we want to take these “white” characters from you? Because we don’t. If we could have characters who were like us, then why would we even bother with racebending? 

Reblogged from angrywocunited  1,302 notes

White men are funny. Please know I love them. White men (and women) have slept in my bed and they’re lovely. But what amazes me is how much of our population does not see that most mainstream American media thoroughly explores the white male psyche: Indiana Jones, Little Miss Sunshine, Austin Powers, Sideways, Indecent Proposal, 500 Days of Summer, Harry Potter, Birth of a Nation…

I love all those movies. I don’t feel oppressed by them as much as I find more of the same type of movies uninteresting. It always cracks me up when this is brought up in dialogue, and you hear the war cry of “reverse racism!” I think it freaks some people out when they realize white men are no longer the center of the universe, and that many other varied, full, vibrant ways-of-being/living/thinking/loving exist outside of the narrow slice represented in mainstream movies. It’s also a bummer, though, because it perpetuates the zero-sum idea that voicing one experience automatically negates others. Just because there are resources (film festivals, grants, etc.) focused on developing cinematic voices outside of the straight-white-male paradigm, doesn’t mean there should be less of the straight-white man (which has been so generously covered in mainstream movies), just more that are not the straight-white man. Ideally, all voices can co-exist in mainstream media.

The corollary is since there is such a rich cinematic straight-white-man tradition, much of the thinking out there about how films should be constructed, is from that perspective. So if you are trying to find and develop your own voice, remember that the box you may be trying to think outside of is an entrenched, dusty, cement box that has existed for way too long. Find creative colleagues who are able to think outside of that box as well and can play with your ideas.

Ultimately, we live in a society that devalues the feminine experience. Not females necessarily, but feminine qualities that exist in men as well. Feminine qualities are often seen as “weak,” “irrelevant,” “complicated,” “nagging.” We also live in a society that does not acknowledge all the many colorful voices out there. It is sad that some folks still think empowerment of non-white people equals reverse racism. Or, they think Slumdog Millionaire was “enough, right?”

So my advice for women starting out on this journey is: Value Yourself. Know you have a right to a seat at the table just like everyone else. Seek out a community that nurtures your unique voice. It feels so good when fellow human beings understand and seek to empower your vision, rather than try to change and conform your art to their paradigm so they feel less uncomfortable.

By Rosylyn Rhee (http://agnesfilms.com/featured-filmmakers/rosylyn-rhee/)
Reblogged from politicisms  1,152 notes
dissidentliberal:

Shakuntala Devi was featured as Google’s doodle for today. And while this is rather nice from a perspective of Feminism, let me tell you what isn’t so nice…
She died earlier this year and I didn’t hear a single peep about it. In fact, I didn’t even know she existed until today because her accomplishments were never taught to us in school. This woman was probably an inspiration to many in the world and she completely smashed the sexist idea that STEM subjects are for men and social ones are for women. In the 1900s, no less.
Yet somehow the news of the deaths of male actors and musicians earlier this year was viewed by our society as worthwhile enough to spread in-person.
This is what feminists are talking about when we say that women and social minorities have been systematically erased from history. If it wasn’t for Google, no one here would have known about Shakuntala Devi and her accomplishments, including myself.

dissidentliberal:

Shakuntala Devi was featured as Google’s doodle for today. And while this is rather nice from a perspective of Feminism, let me tell you what isn’t so nice…

She died earlier this year and I didn’t hear a single peep about it. In fact, I didn’t even know she existed until today because her accomplishments were never taught to us in school. This woman was probably an inspiration to many in the world and she completely smashed the sexist idea that STEM subjects are for men and social ones are for women. In the 1900s, no less.

Yet somehow the news of the deaths of male actors and musicians earlier this year was viewed by our society as worthwhile enough to spread in-person.

This is what feminists are talking about when we say that women and social minorities have been systematically erased from history. If it wasn’t for Google, no one here would have known about Shakuntala Devi and her accomplishments, including myself.

Reblogged from thisislucreziasand  20,066 notes

But despite Hollywood’s near-complete refusal to acknowledge it, ancient Rome was the original melting pot. See, back then, color and prejudice weren’t linked — unlike racism and stupidity today. Rome even had at least two African emperors, Severus and Macrinus. Rome was unique in the ancient world for its inclusive citizenship. In the past, a city-state like Sparta might have conquered a people and enslaved or slaughtered them all. Rome, on the other hand, blew ancient people’s minds by assimilating or even naturalizing the conquered. The ancient Romans didn’t even force conquered peoples to give up their own languages or customs.

The important thing for the Romans was that people followed the law, paid taxes, and, oh yeah, fought in the Roman army. The Romans were no dummies: Little old Rome was never going to be able to populate the world it conquered, let alone defend it, so absorbing other peoples like a giant legionary sponge was the only way to keep enough bodies in the military and on its farms. Rome enrolled northwest Africans, Moors, Gauls, Celts, Jews — pretty much anyone who could swing a sword or throw a spear — which is how an Ethiopian soldier could find himself fighting in Britain (maybe that’s why every film Roman speaks with a British accent).

There are no exact numbers on ancient Roman diversity, but given Rome’s constant contact with Africa and the Near East, the coliseum we asked you to imagine earlier should look more like Ellis Island and less like a Dave Matthews Band concert.

By

5 Ridiculous Lies You Believe About Ancient Civilizations (via sumayyahdaud)

Although this link it to a Cracked article, all citations are academic sources.

Every link is to a PDF textbook. :) In fact, a lot of Cracked’s historical articles are quite well-sourced.

(via thisislucreziasand)