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Reblogged from bisexual-books  709 notes

bisexual-books:

It’s time for another Bisexual Books giveaway!  Bisexual YA author Corinne Duyvis was generous enough to send us some swag from her US tour and we’re happy to pass it along to you guys!  

You could win all the fantastic goodies pictured above:

Now all the boring rules stuff:

  • This giveaway is open to everyone (yes international friends this includes you).  
  • You must be following us here at bisexual-books to win
  • You must reblog this post (likes don’t count for this one sorry guys).   
  • You can reblog as many times as you’d like
  • But no giveaway blogs  
  • Winners will be chosen August 10th at 8pm CST

And don’t forget to enter our other two awesome giveaways — one for bisexual comics and the other for romance!

People can stop whining now.

Skin color isn’t important. All that matters is that the role goes to the best actor.

This is why it’s important to wait before making judgments.

Where’s the Asian Jedi. Wheelchair Jedi, Native American Jedi. This movie is going to be a mid 90′s Burger King commercial.

This feels forced.

By

Blogger the Wookiee Gunner takes on the above tired arguments against diversity in Star Wars.   Memorable call outs below, but read the full article here.

Star Wars fans are familiar with the expression “balance with the Force,” but how about balance in representation? …fans had a right to voice their concerns, especially given the lack of a significant female and racial presence. Dismissing those legitimate concerns and labeling our actions as “whining” only proves how much farther we have to go before achieving equal and proper representation for all.

In a cast of 15 people, that makes up 33 percent. I had someone once tell me that Star Wars shouldn’t be used as a platform for my social agendas. Star Wars, like many other things, is a reflection of our own society. It is a galaxy with unlimited and untapped potential. Why would we limit that galaxy to our own archaic standards? 

Forced? Oh. You mean like being forced to watch white male actor after white male actor get the lead part in movies year after year? That kind of forced?

Follow The Wookiee Gunner on tumblr

Reblogged from leeandlow  458 notes

You are putting your responsibility at the feet of marginalized people when you ask for nebulous “permission.” Please stop doing that. It’s not an okay thing to do. It is NOT the responsibility of marginalized people to pat you on the back and tell you that you’re a good person, you’re doing okay, and not to feel bad. Don’t put that on them. NO ONE can give you some kind of magic blanket “okay” on your writing, ESPECIALLY when they’ve never read it.

That’s perhaps what bothers me most… asking people to tell you it’s okay for you to write something when they have absolutely no context or idea of how you write. They don’t know if you’re going to research. They don’t know if you’re going to write stereotypes. The real answer to this question is always going to be I don’t know, it depends on how it’s done.

By Authors S.E. Sinkhorn, “To My Fellow Straight White Writers: On Diversity” (via leeandlow)
Reblogged from thisislucreziasand  542 notes

    allerasphinx:

    basedandbiased:

    sephora:

    VIDEO: NUDE EVERYDAY SMOKY EYE HOW-TO

    Sephora PRO Artist Helen Phillips demonstrates this simple day-to-night look.

    SHOP SEPHORA >

    It’s 2014 and Lupita Nyong’o is the face for an International luxury cosmetics brand, yet Sephora continues to exclude dark skintones in most of their tutorials, VIB promotions and gifts, and in their marketing materials. The last thing the internet needs is another “nude” tutorial specifically for white skin. Do better.

    Maybe Sephora doesn’t know any black and brown people. Maybe Sephora lives in a really white neighborhood. You don’t know Sephora’s life.

    Or maybe Sephora’s just that one white friend you have that doesn’t realise they’re being racist by pretending skin colour doesn’t matter ~because we’re all the human race.~

Who would you want to see on a panel discussing women superheroes?

We’re putting together a panel for San Diego ComicCon 2014!   Right now we’re envisioning a panel focused on women superheroes and aiming for an all-women panel!    What we definitely want is a lot of intersectionality on the panel— particularly women of color and women who hold multiple intersectional identities!  Women who write novels or comics or webcomics about superheroines!  Women who study transmedia and the depiction of superheroes!  Women who provide cultural commentary on comics and media representation!

This is where we’d love your help!  What would your dream panel on this topic look like?   Who should we invite and who would you like to see?

Racebending is proud to announce that we will be hosting our first Midwest panel discussion on media representation in comics, Diverse Means for Diverse Worlds at this years C2E2 in Chicago! 
The panel is focused on art and storytelling techniques in comics that allow fantasy worlds to mirror real world diversity. It is presented by an equally diverse roster of panelists whose own work and experience range from webcomics to running comics conventions. The panel presentation will be held on April 27th from 2:45-3:45 in panel room S402 at Chicago’s McCormick Place Convention Center.  Panelists include Gail Simone, Turtel Onli, Gene Ha, Jay Fuller, Ramon K. Perez, and Marjorie M. Liu with moderator Gabe Canada.
About Racebending.com
Racebending.com is an international grassroots organization of media consumers who support entertainment equality. We advocate for underrepresented groups in entertainment media. Since our formation in 2009, we have been dedicated to furthering equal opportunities in Hollywood and beyond.
This website was founded by fans of Avatar: The Last Airbender who were appalled by the casting discrimination that occurred during the production of the The Last Airbender film adaptation. We are now comprised of thousands of supporters in 50 countries around the world. We are a coalition and community dedicated to encouraging fair representation in the media. As a far-reaching movement of media consumers, students, parents, and professionals, we promote just and equal opportunities in the entertainment industry.
About C2E2
The Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo - also known as C2E2 - is a convention spanning the latest and greatest from the worlds of comics, movies, television, toys, anime, manga and video games. Bringing the best of popular culture to Downtown Chicago, C2E2’s show floor is packed with hundreds of exhibitors, panels and autograph sessions giving fans a chance to interact with their favorite creators and screening rooms featuring sneak peeks at films and television shows months before they hit either the big or small screen!

Racebending is proud to announce that we will be hosting our first Midwest panel discussion on media representation in comics, Diverse Means for Diverse Worlds at this years C2E2 in Chicago!

The panel is focused on art and storytelling techniques in comics that allow fantasy worlds to mirror real world diversity. It is presented by an equally diverse roster of panelists whose own work and experience range from webcomics to running comics conventions. The panel presentation will be held on April 27th from 2:45-3:45 in panel room S402 at Chicago’s McCormick Place Convention Center.  Panelists include Gail Simone, Turtel Onli, Gene Ha, Jay Fuller, Ramon K. Perez, and Marjorie M. Liu with moderator Gabe Canada.

About Racebending.com

Racebending.com is an international grassroots organization of media consumers who support entertainment equality. We advocate for underrepresented groups in entertainment media. Since our formation in 2009, we have been dedicated to furthering equal opportunities in Hollywood and beyond.

This website was founded by fans of Avatar: The Last Airbender who were appalled by the casting discrimination that occurred during the production of the The Last Airbender film adaptation. We are now comprised of thousands of supporters in 50 countries around the world. We are a coalition and community dedicated to encouraging fair representation in the media. As a far-reaching movement of media consumers, students, parents, and professionals, we promote just and equal opportunities in the entertainment industry.

About C2E2

The Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo - also known as C2E2 - is a convention spanning the latest and greatest from the worlds of comics, movies, television, toys, anime, manga and video games. Bringing the best of popular culture to Downtown Chicago, C2E2’s show floor is packed with hundreds of exhibitors, panels and autograph sessions giving fans a chance to interact with their favorite creators and screening rooms featuring sneak peeks at films and television shows months before they hit either the big or small screen!

Reblogged from fatpinkcast  908 notes
fatpinkcast:


With one exception over the course of four decades, HBO has not aired an original one-hour drama series created by a woman.
With one exception over the course of four decades, HBO has not aired an original one-hour drama or dramatic miniseries creatively led at its debut by a person of color. That exception is more than 21 years old (see below for more details).
Just under 8 percent of HBO’s original dramas and miniseries came from women, and 2.6 percent came from people of color. Less than 5 percent of its one-hour dramas — one of the most high-profile entertainment products in the world — were created by women. That’s over the course of nearly 40 years.

Read more at the Huffington Post:  Who Creates Drama At HBO? Very Few Women Or People Of Color

fatpinkcast:

With one exception over the course of four decades, HBO has not aired an original one-hour drama series created by a woman.

With one exception over the course of four decades, HBO has not aired an original one-hour drama or dramatic miniseries creatively led at its debut by a person of color. That exception is more than 21 years old (see below for more details).

Just under 8 percent of HBO’s original dramas and miniseries came from women, and 2.6 percent came from people of color. Less than 5 percent of its one-hour dramas — one of the most high-profile entertainment products in the world — were created by women. That’s over the course of nearly 40 years.

Read more at the Huffington Post:  Who Creates Drama At HBO? Very Few Women Or People Of Color


Even as a snapshot of the industry, however, the numbers tell a clear story about who gets the keys to the fanciest car, culturally speaking. At the outlets responsible for many top programs, women and people of color are enormously under-represented as creators. If one focuses only on the last dozen years at AMC, FX, Showtime, Netflix and HBO, around 12 percent of the creators and narrative architects in the dramatic realm were women.
According to theWomen’s Media Center, “Shows with no women creators had casts that were 41 percent female. Shows with at least one female creator had casts that were 47 percent female.” Given how few women and people of color are present at a show’s creation, is it any wonder we can’t escape this debate?
And so we find ourselves in one of those closed loops that “True Detective’s” Rust Cohle described in one of his most memorable philosophical digressions. We go around and around, talking about individual characters and the missteps of particular shows. We wonder why women are too often depicted as nags, flunkies or side salads. We wonder why women often get less to do, have less to say and so often feel the impulse to take off their shirts. We wonder why people of color aren’t often depicted with compelling emotional lives or as complicated characters. We wonder why non-white men and women are hardly ever the protagonists.

Read more at the Huffington Post.

Even as a snapshot of the industry, however, the numbers tell a clear story about who gets the keys to the fanciest car, culturally speaking. At the outlets responsible for many top programs, women and people of color are enormously under-represented as creators. If one focuses only on the last dozen years at AMC, FX, Showtime, Netflix and HBO, around 12 percent of the creators and narrative architects in the dramatic realm were women.

According to theWomen’s Media Center, “Shows with no women creators had casts that were 41 percent female. Shows with at least one female creator had casts that were 47 percent female.” Given how few women and people of color are present at a show’s creation, is it any wonder we can’t escape this debate?

And so we find ourselves in one of those closed loops that “True Detective’s” Rust Cohle described in one of his most memorable philosophical digressions. We go around and around, talking about individual characters and the missteps of particular shows. We wonder why women are too often depicted as nags, flunkies or side salads. We wonder why women often get less to do, have less to say and so often feel the impulse to take off their shirts. We wonder why people of color aren’t often depicted with compelling emotional lives or as complicated characters. We wonder why non-white men and women are hardly ever the protagonists.

Read more at the Huffington Post.

There were the innocuous comments like Does his race really matter?” and “Who cares about his skin color? It’s his character that’s important!” Wonderful sentiments each, but ultimately if benignly ignorant of the social scaffolding that still places non-white characters at a disadvantage in mainstream media, as well as the need for representation among an audience filled with often overlooked people of color.

Worse, however, were the accusatory and the insulting: “You’re just projecting, stop it,” one person said, “Star Wars doesn’t need your PC trash” said others in one fashion or another, and “He doesn’t need to be black…“—as though that were the only alternative to being white—”…to be a baddass, people. Go watch Roots and stop trying to take Star Wars from white people.” was the response of one all too memorable commentator on Facebook which I had the personal displeasure to witness.

So, you see, when fans turn to people like [Lucasfilm VIP Pablo] Hidalgo, many aren’t just hoping for answers, they were hoping for a shield. They wanted to hear that it wasn’t just all in their heads, that they weren’t projecting. They wanted to hear that there was actually someone who represented them in this new series, and that they wouldn’t need to squint and tilt their heads to see themselves in a new Star Wars hero. They wanted to stand up proudly in the fandom and assert their feelings without fearing venom and fire for daring to think that a man of color could lead a Star Wars show.

By

Mia Moretti on the new lead characters of color announced for Star Wars: Rebels.   “Rebels, Kanan Jarrus, and the race factor” from Eleven-Thirty Eight.com.

"Wneed protagonists like Sabine. We need a powerful young Asian woman to stand for the oft-neglected Asian women in the vast and diverse Star Wars audience. To light a new fire in the hearts of young Asian children, and little girls of all sorts so that we might share Star Wars with them. We need a character who takes us back to the Mandalorians’ roots as an omni-inclusive culture of soldiers after the singularly white, nordic group The Clone Wars brought to television viewers. And we need a protagonist like Kanan, a strong man of color in whose heroics a wide range of fans can see a reflection of themselves. We need a character that can inspire fresh awe in young boys of color, someone who can show them that they too can be the heroes of a galaxy far, far away.”

Lee & Low Books continues to create infographics focusing on diversity in media representation.  This one focuses on the Academy Awards from 1927 to 2012.   The researchers reviewed the 85 year old history of the institution and call the results “staggeringly disappointing.”

Since the Academy Awards was founded 85-years ago:
Only one woman of color (1%) has ever won the Academy Award for Best Actress
Only six men of color (7%) have ever won the Academy Award for Best Actor
Only one woman (1%) has ever won the Academy Award for Best Director

Check out more commentary from the researchers and an interview with filmmakers of color at their website!

Lee & Low Books continues to create infographics focusing on diversity in media representation.  This one focuses on the Academy Awards from 1927 to 2012.   The researchers reviewed the 85 year old history of the institution and call the results “staggeringly disappointing.”

Since the Academy Awards was founded 85-years ago:

  • Only one woman of color (1%) has ever won the Academy Award for Best Actress
  • Only six men of color (7%) have ever won the Academy Award for Best Actor
  • Only one woman (1%) has ever won the Academy Award for Best Director

Check out more commentary from the researchers and an interview with filmmakers of color at their website!

Reblogged from micdotcom  4,592 notes

policymic:

TV shows and movies with more diversity make more money

TV shows with more ethnically diverse casts actually receive higher ratings, while diverse films make significantly more money: for instance, movies with relatively high onscreen minority involvement (21-30%) posted $160.1 million in global box office receipts in 2011, while those with lower involvement (less than 10%) made just $68.5 million.

Read more

Follow policymic

Reblogged from gradientlair  365 notes

Thoughts About Shonda Rhimes’ DGA Speech On Diversity

gradientlair:

Shonda Rhimes recently won The Diversity Award at The Director’s Guild Awards. According to Entertainment Weekly, she stated that she is "truly profoundly honored to receive this award" but is "also a little pissed off.” This type of dichotomy in response makes sense to me because obviously she doesn’t even want such an award to need to exist but for the industry to simply reflect what is true; the lives of diverse people. Her shows incorporate queer relationships and Black women, people not always seen on every major show. Also, she’s spoken out before on media diversity in terms of race, gender and sexual orientation

Part of her speech included this:

It’s not because of a lack of talent. It’s because of a lack of access. People hire who they know. If it’s been a white boys club for 70 years, that’s a lot of white boys hiring one another. And I don’t believe that that happens out of any specific racism or sexism or prejudice. People hire their friends. They hire who they know. It’s comfortable. You want to be successful, you don’t want to take any chances, you don’t want to rock the boat by hiring people of color because, well, look at us,’ she said. ‘Both Betsy and I like the world that we work in to look like the world that we live in. Different voices make for different visions. Different visions make for something original. Original is what the public is starving for.’

I think this statement is great because it is mostly true. We know of the talent of actors of colour. Much of the public is starving for this excellence. For example, some in the media act perplexed over the success of Sleepy Hollow (not one of Shonda’s shows though) but I would think it would be obvious that such a diverse cast—many of the actors with great resumes and great training—would draw people in. 

However, I do have an issue with the "I don’t believe that that happens out of any specific racism or sexism or prejudice" part of this excerpt from her speech. Though I absolutely adore Shonda Rhimes’ creativity and brilliance, she is incorrect here. It is specific.

There is a history and reasons why Whites’ neighborhoods, schools, networks and eventually friendships remain White. This is not solely about them “coincidentally” preferring White people. The same applies to the media. For example, The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (who awards Oscars) is not “coincidentally” 94% White and 77% male because they’re all “buddies.” That is specificHiring decisions for television writing—what mostly keeps Black people out—is specific. Knowing diverse shows do better than ones that are not diverse and still casting majority or all-White casts is specific.

I understand what she was trying to do here—point out a need without associating serious blame—but the facts are the facts. Sure, personal relationships develop that are homogenous because of the fear of “the other” for Whites and protection from oppressive interpersonal interactions with Whites for Black people and other people of colour. There’s issues of families connecting and shared culture. That makes sense. But in the case of Whites—who structural power affirms—it’s like “friends” are playing poker, but at a table in a house built on structural inequality and institutional racism. 

I want to see media get to the place that Shonda envisions. I really do. But this can occur without separating the history as to why media is the way it is now or without pacifying those who think it’s all a misunderstanding and just about friends doing things for friends.