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Reblogged from locsgirl  482 notes

The Air Nomad Genocide

locsgirl:

ladywentworth:

locsgirl:

ladywentworth:

I’m not sure if this has been talked about on Tumblr before, but I want to talk a little about the Air Nomad genocide in A:TLA. According to the show, all of the airbenders, except for Avatar Aang, have been completely wiped out.

I know that the whole point of the show was that Aang was the last airbender and he needed to get back at the Fire Nation for the atrocious act, but was it really necessary? Why did Sozin feel the need to wipe out the least threatening nation of all the nations in Avatar-verse? From what we’ve gathered from the show, the Air Nomads were peaceful and didn’t even feel the need to have a formal military to defend themselves. Sozin wanted Roku’s successor as the Avatar dead, but there should not have been any further intent to hurt the Air Nomads and punish them for that. Sozin’s go-ahead on the massacre of the Air Nomads just seems like a weak and cowardly move on his part (not that it’s completely out of character). If Sozin used the Great Comet in order to send a message to the rest of the world and begin a war, he made the wrong decision to kill the least confrontational nation of them all. If anything, it would have made more sense that Sozin would have tried to advance further into the Earth Kingdom (I’m not sure if he did? Can anyone confirm/correct me?). What did the Air Nomads do or not do to have elicited such a response from Sozin that he decided it was best to kill them all?

Another thing that bothers me is that apparently every single Air Nomad has been wiped out according to the canon. I find this almost impossible to believe. Even if the Air Nomad population hadn’t been large, there should have been at least one survivor other than Aang. It should not have been beyond the realm of possibility that some Air Nomads managed to escape and find refuge in the Earth Kingdom. I’ve seen this idea used in fanfiction and I’m glad that at least part of the fandom has the same mindset I do, but why was it so necessary to have Air Nomads out of the canon? And wouldn’t the Earth Kingdom have made a move to help defend the Air Nomads? Would it really have been that impossible to give Aang a little hope by discovering that some Air Nomads managed to escape and remained in disguise somewhere in the Earth Kingdom? It’s also possible that not every Air Nomad was as peaceful and pacifist as we’ve been lead to believe. Avatar Yangchen is a perfect example—she didn’t hesitate to change her beliefs when she realized that they would get in the way of her duty as the Avatar. Wouldn’t the same have occurred if it meant survival for the hunted Air Nomads? Sure, they didn’t have a formal military, but that doesn’t negate that at least some of them had some airbending training in attack and defense. Did the flight instinct kick in with any of them? 

I know that the Air Nomad genocide was a key plot point in A:TLA, but now that I’m really considering it, it really seems like an unnecessary move for the story. 

I’ve been thinking about this so many times.

The ONLY explanation I can come up with for why Sozin had them wiped out is, although Aang learned he was the Avatar at the age of 12, no one else besides the other monks of the Southern Air Temple knew, so no one else in the world knew, and since Sozin, being the dick he was, didn’t know who the Avatar was, he decided to lash out at the whole population altogether.

Zhao (in one of the comics) said that  Air Nomad cultural artifacts were used to lure surviving Air Nomads, and it was an Air Nomad who turned on his people and had the Fire Nation attack them (the same monk was later executed).  There was also an Air Nomad girl who survived, and she lived in a forest and would fight whenever she could.

Monk Gyatso took out a room full of Fire Nation soldiers before he died, which confirms that airbenders knew some deadly attacks, and coincides with the fandom headcanon that the real reason Sozin had the Air Nomads wiped out was because they were really the most dangerous.

Although I’m still of the personal belief that some Air Nomads did in fact survive all that, and that there’s a secret society of them living somewhere, like the Sun Warriors.

I like all of this—and it makes a lot of sense! I never considered the fact that because the Air Nomads were the least threatening, they were possibly the biggest threat to the Fire Nation. If anyone was half the bender Monk Gyatso was, it’s possible that the Air Nomads could have been a force to be reckoned with if they had a formal military. Aang is a pretty darn good airbender during the events of A:TLA and his training wasn’t even finished yet. I’m glad that in the comics (which, unfortunately, I have not read yet) there were some survivors.

I like your explanation about why Sozin did it. It fits his character, and it explains why it meant that every Air Nomad had to go. It’s devastating to think that an entire nation of people were wiped out because of the greed and thirst for power of one person. What if most of them died defending the identity of the Avatar? :(

I’ve thought of Monk Gyatso and the others dying to protect Aang’s identity, and since Aang ran away and they didn’t know where he’d gone, that probably ticked off Sozin even more. =(

Guru Pathik, being 150 years of age when Aang met him, was around back then.  I like to think he helped some Air Nomads escape and stay hidden.

I still think Ty Lee is an Air Nomad descendent hiding in plain sight. She has the grey eyes, brown hair, effervescent personality, and amazing acrobatic skills. Her parents also had a lot of kids. There are probably more left than Aang thinks; many just don’t know their own family history.

The Depiction of Mothers and Motherhood in Avatar: The Last Airbender and The Legend of Korra  (Spoilers!)

Originally, these were just notes jotted down for the review of Gene Yang’s The Search (since that graphic novel reveals what happened to Ursa and explores the theme of Motherhood) but it seems like they might be useful to the broader conversation about the depiction of mothers in Avatar and Korra.   (Hopefully I’m not missing any important characters!)

A couple of things I noticed upon rewatch were that whenever the original Gaang met a family, usually the mom would defer to the dad (eg. the mom’s of Haru, Lee, Toph, Mai, etc.)   We see this deference to the husband in Korra, as well (Unulaq’s wife doesn’t know what’s up.   Senna is relatively passive about Korra’s upbringing and the rebellion compared to the deeply engaged Tonraq.)   While the worldbuilding has established that the setting is patriarchal, we know that what is expected by society shouldn’t necessarily be reflected in what we see in practice.   (For example, my grandmother was raised in a patriarchal society and expected to defer to her husband, but that doesn’t mean it actually happened—and she was far from being an exception among her peers.)

In many of the examples above, where the name of the mother is not given, we do know the name and identity of the character’s father.  (Frequently, the mother will be dead.)  The only significant example reversing this trope is the identity of Lin Beifong’s father—and in this case, the identity of her mother is known because she is a main character in the original series.   The only other example of this that I can think of is that we don’t know the name of Kanna’s first husband (Hakoda’s father.)

I don’t think we need to know the names of every single parent of characters in the series.   Obviously, it is based on the demands of the plot.   In this case, the plot the writers have created prioritizes the roles of the fathers, and that reinforces patriarchal tropes.

Hope these notes help generate discussion around representations of women and mothers in Avatar.   Interested in hearing what people think!

What would you like to see addressed in an article on motherhood, gender, and sexism in the Avatar franchise?

I have a review copy of the last part of The Search from Dark Horse (which talks about what happened to Zuko’s mom) and initially I was just going to review that for Racebending.com…but lately I’ve been thinking of expanding the review to be more all-encompassing of depictions of motherhood, gender, and sexism in the series (or in the fandom?)    (Particularly after a fellow fan at the Barnes and Noble event asked Bryke if we’ll see more women characters in Book 2 since most of the new ones are men.)

Thought I’d float this idea out here for discussion with other tumblr users:   

What topics would you like to see addressed in an article on motherhood, gender, and sexism in the Avatar franchise?

Diaspora, Immigration and Identity in “Avatar: the Last Airbender”

irresistible-revolution:

(aka another reason this show is my fave and you should all watch it)

cw: genocide

image

This post has been marinating for a while now. As a diasporic WOC there are certain themes in AtLA that resonate very strongly with me, and it’s led me to consider how the story and its characters affirm immigrant/diasporic experiences, the inevitable upheavals of imperialism and the kinds of resilience and strength it takes to survive that. So I’m gonna talk about the diasporic/ immigrant narrative thread I find in each character and the Four Nations at large. 

Read More

Fantastic essay describing the diasporic experience and the nuances of A:TLA

Reblogged from mudron  167 notes
mudron:

It wasn’t until reading the second issue of The Search that I remembered that the 2x3-foot map of the Avatar: The Last Airbender universe that I drew last year is still available here as a 300 dpi, unflattened, print-quality Photoshop file.

Mudron has uploaded a giant map of the Avatar universe to Google Drive so you can download it, look at all the detail, and print your own!

mudron:

It wasn’t until reading the second issue of The Search that I remembered that the 2x3-foot map of the Avatar: The Last Airbender universe that I drew last year is still available here as a 300 dpi, unflattened, print-quality Photoshop file.

Mudron has uploaded a giant map of the Avatar universe to Google Drive so you can download it, look at all the detail, and print your own!

Just finished reading the preview version of this Free Comic Book Day comic about Mai by Gene Yang.  It’s a good stand alone story that may change how you view the character, now that she is independent and no longer beholden to either Azula or Zuko.
Free Comic Book Day is this Saturday; to pick up your free copy head over to your local comic book store.  The Avatar comic will be on the back side of the free Star Wars and Captain Midnight issue and most comic book stores will probably just display the Star Wars cover, so make sure to grab the stack and flip them over to show off Avatar cover!   It’s exciting to see that the Avatar franchise is choosing to depict one of the series’ female characters, rather than say, Aang or Zuko.

Just finished reading the preview version of this Free Comic Book Day comic about Mai by Gene Yang.  It’s a good stand alone story that may change how you view the character, now that she is independent and no longer beholden to either Azula or Zuko.

Free Comic Book Day is this Saturday; to pick up your free copy head over to your local comic book store.  The Avatar comic will be on the back side of the free Star Wars and Captain Midnight issue and most comic book stores will probably just display the Star Wars cover, so make sure to grab the stack and flip them over to show off Avatar cover!   It’s exciting to see that the Avatar franchise is choosing to depict one of the series’ female characters, rather than say, Aang or Zuko.

Reblogged from avatar-mom  79 notes
avatar-mom:

The Promise Part 3 will be available September 26th. While we are all waiting to finally discover the answers to our many questions, why not enjoy a pre release interview with Gene Yang.
Recently, Avatarspirit.net asked Gene some important questions to help fans prepare for what’s to come, as well as understand the process behind some of the story’s most discussed events.
http://www.avatarspirit.net/

Check out this really awesome interview with Gene Yang on The Promise!  He talks about how he and Bryke came up with the idea of Aang’s “promise..”

For The Promise, we wanted to introduce another facet to the discussion. How does the idea of consent change things? We already know that Aang won’t murder – he won’t kill without the victim’s consent. But what if he does have the victim’s consent? What if the victim actively requests it?In Buddhism (upon which Airbender philosophy is based), consent changes the conversation. Murder is wrong. But killing with the victim’s consent is referred as voluntary euthanasia. A person can ask you to kill them if they’re in tremendous pain or if they think they’re a danger to others. (In Zuko’s case, both of these are in play.) Here, there’s debate within Buddhism….What happens if a friend makes that kind of request? What happens when Aang’s identities as Avatar, Airbender, and friend conflict with one another? 

Our review of The Promise is also up at Racebending.com.  Getting excited about this release date!

avatar-mom:

The Promise Part 3 will be available September 26th. While we are all waiting to finally discover the answers to our many questions, why not enjoy a pre release interview with Gene Yang.

Recently, Avatarspirit.net asked Gene some important questions to help fans prepare for what’s to come, as well as understand the process behind some of the story’s most discussed events.

http://www.avatarspirit.net/

Check out this really awesome interview with Gene Yang on The Promise!  He talks about how he and Bryke came up with the idea of Aang’s “promise..”


For The Promise, we wanted to introduce another facet to the discussion. How does the idea of consent change things? We already know that Aang won’t murder – he won’t kill without the victim’s consent. But what if he does have the victim’s consent? What if the victim actively requests it?

In Buddhism (upon which Airbender philosophy is based), consent changes the conversation. Murder is wrong. But killing with the victim’s consent is referred as voluntary euthanasia. A person can ask you to kill them if they’re in tremendous pain or if they think they’re a danger to others. (In Zuko’s case, both of these are in play.) Here, there’s debate within Buddhism….What happens if a friend makes that kind of request? What happens when Aang’s identities as Avatar, Airbender, and friend conflict with one another? 

Our review of The Promise is also up at Racebending.com.  Getting excited about this release date!

I know people had a lot of questions about the third installment of The Promise, the Avatar: The Last Airbender sequel graphic novel by Gene Yang.   Racebending.com was given an opportunity to review the book before it’s release this coming Wednesday.  Here’s the review—again, it’s our fan take on Avatar with a “racebending” perspective…

(NOTE: Our review does not contain major spoilers from part 3, but does contain info that might be considered minor spoilers, including images from Dark Horse’s currently posted preview pages.)

Aang also wrestles with the idea that stronger, more privileged Nations have and can still harm and oppress weaker ones. For readers of Racebending.com in particular, the Avatar Aang “fan club” plot line escalates to explore the issue of cultural appropriation. Aang is initially pleased to learn he has a fan club (which is comprised entirely of girls, a bit of a stereotypical oversight…) He grows distrustful when they begin to emulate Air Nomad Culture without any understanding of it.

The fans claim to respect Aang and Air Nomad Culture, but have also cluelessly appropriated Air Nomad customs. Yang shows how adoration, exotification, and good intentions can still inflict offense and harm. Is it possible for outsiders to partake in another culture, and if so, who dictates the terms of cultural practice? Racebending readers will appreciate how Gene Yang calls out and frames this issue, within the constraints of the Avatar world. I was glad to see the topic raised, since the outcome plays a role later on in The Legend of Korra, and there’s the additional meta-commentary of Avatar being inspired by so many Asian and Inuit influences. In The Promise, Aang begins to confront his position as the last of the Airbenders, and by extension, his role as the sole living gatekeeper of his lost culture and people.

You can read the full review at Racebending.com:  "The Promise Ends" and "The Search" Begins!

Reblogged from thepeopleseason  165 notes

ATTN: the person who submitted the post about being white and writing a series of fantasy novels based on “the cultures and mythologies of the Hawaiian, Maori, Samoan and Tongan people.”

thepeopleseason:

racebending:

I’m not posting the full submission because it was quite lengthy and the issues are very complex.  I tried to look for an Ask on your personal tumblr page but coudln’t find it, or else I would have sent this privately.  

Read More

If we left the writing-about-other-cultures solely to members of those cultures, we would not have seen Avatar: The Last Airbender.

Yes, and I think one of the strengths of Avatar: The Last Airbender was that the creators really took the time to get it right.  

Without the effort to seek out feedback from different cultural consultants (eg. a kung fu expert who took the martial arts very seriously, a linguist and calligrapher to painstakingly make sure every word was written correctly, a cultural consultant on Asian American representation and stereotypes), Avatar: The Last Airbender could have been a very different product.  

I think the cultural consultant on Asian American representation (who worked on Seasons One and Two of A:TLA) did a good job of ensuring there were no dog eating jokes, advocating for more voice actors of color in the series, and making it a policy that no voice actors used a fakey “Asian” accent.  

And—this may not be a popular opinion—I actually think The Legend of Korra could have strongly benefited from additional cultural consultation, particularly from someone with a critical feminist theory perspective.  Support from someone coming from that framework probably could have provided the production with some constructive feedback on the depiction of privilege and oppression in Republic City and the way the Equalists were depicted, additional insight on colonialism and it’s impact on indigenous people of color (eg. the Water Tribe after Fire Nation imperialism and the fact that the villains this season were both Water Tribe and also two of only three significant brown characters in the entire season), the overall characterization of Mako in the Korra/Mako/Asami love triangle, and some of the weaknesses in Korra’s character development arc, etc.

Reblogged from damnlayoffthebleach  134 notes
damnlayoffthebleach:

THIS IS NICK.COM
YES, THEY WHITEWASHED KATARA…
THIS IS NOT FAN ART
THIS IS A SCREENSHOT
http://nicktoons.nick.com/videos/clip/path-to-korra-mythology-spot-65ss.html

NO…

damnlayoffthebleach points out that the Nicktoons website depicts Sokka and Katara as has having distinctly lighter skin than they are depicted as having in the show.  (For example, Katara is drawn as having darker skin than Aang in the show; here she is depicted as having lighter skin than him.)   
This isn’t the first time the character of Katara has been “whitewashed” (such as in The Last Airbender feature film and it’s media-tie ins.)
  

Fan tumblrs like damnlayoffthebleach and korraisnottan have also been examining fan culture’s tendency to describe Korra as “tan" in fan fiction or draw Korra as white in fan art.  This is an ongoing concern in fandom, and it’s troubling that it’s also happening on the official site.
What Can Fans Do to Persuade Nick to Correct the Banner?
Leave a Comment on the Page.  The Avatar page takes comments.  This requires creating an account on Nick.com, but if enough people leave comments publicly critiquing the graphic, they may feel pressured to change it to accurately reflect Katara’s appearance as in the animated series.  (It looks like the Nick site allows you to create your own avatar and has a lot of options for skin tones, so consider setting that up to depict you, too.)
Contact the Webmaster.  Go to Nick.com’s main page and scroll to the very bottom and click on REPORT A CONCERN.  A pop up window will appear allowing you to report a “technical concern.”  You can compose and send an email here.
Tips to Help Ensure that You are Heard
Keep your comment or email short and direct.  Three sentences is great, five sentences max is best.
State who you are (fan or parent of fan), link to the image/page in question, explain how it affects you, and remember to clearly state how they can fix it (eg. use a different image that depicts Katara with brown skin, etc.)
Be friendly—the person reading the comment or email is likely not the person responsible for this image—they may not even be familiar with Katara or Avatar.  Share your opinion in a clear and helpful manner to make it easy for them to understand your concern.  It’s in everyone’s best interest that this be addressed!
Let us know if you get a response!

damnlayoffthebleach:

THIS IS NICK.COM

YES, THEY WHITEWASHED KATARA…

THIS IS NOT FAN ART

THIS IS A SCREENSHOT

http://nicktoons.nick.com/videos/clip/path-to-korra-mythology-spot-65ss.html

NO…

damnlayoffthebleach points out that the Nicktoons website depicts Sokka and Katara as has having distinctly lighter skin than they are depicted as having in the show.  (For example, Katara is drawn as having darker skin than Aang in the show; here she is depicted as having lighter skin than him.)   

This isn’t the first time the character of Katara has been “whitewashed” (such as in The Last Airbender feature film and it’s media-tie ins.)

  

Fan tumblrs like damnlayoffthebleach and korraisnottan have also been examining fan culture’s tendency to describe Korra as “tan" in fan fiction or draw Korra as white in fan art.  This is an ongoing concern in fandom, and it’s troubling that it’s also happening on the official site.

What Can Fans Do to Persuade Nick to Correct the Banner?

    1. Leave a Comment on the Page.  The Avatar page takes comments.  This requires creating an account on Nick.com, but if enough people leave comments publicly critiquing the graphic, they may feel pressured to change it to accurately reflect Katara’s appearance as in the animated series.  (It looks like the Nick site allows you to create your own avatar and has a lot of options for skin tones, so consider setting that up to depict you, too.)
    2. Contact the Webmaster.  Go to Nick.com’s main page and scroll to the very bottom and click on REPORT A CONCERN.  A pop up window will appear allowing you to report a “technical concern.”  You can compose and send an email here.

Tips to Help Ensure that You are Heard

  • Keep your comment or email short and direct.  Three sentences is great, five sentences max is best.
  • State who you are (fan or parent of fan), link to the image/page in question, explain how it affects you, and remember to clearly state how they can fix it (eg. use a different image that depicts Katara with brown skin, etc.)
  • Be friendly—the person reading the comment or email is likely not the person responsible for this image—they may not even be familiar with Katara or Avatar.  Share your opinion in a clear and helpful manner to make it easy for them to understand your concern.  It’s in everyone’s best interest that this be addressed!
  • Let us know if you get a response!
Reblogged from jhameia  81 notes

I never realized how many of the voice actors on avatar are white

jhameia:

tithenai:

ktempest:

jhameia:

mountainousmoundymarmalade:

rakalak:

i mean, there’s dante basco and mako—-

WHOA, JUST GOT THAT— mako in legend of korra is named after the voice actor who played uncle iroh until he passed? omgggg

but all the other main characters (or most of them? i think?) are white. according to imdb.

i… okay.

i know, right? that’s the one thing i struggle with the very very most. is that two of the strongest indigenous women characters on television have been voiced by two white women. i know the total babe from hawai’i 5O has voiced a couple of characters, and in the last airbender, the guy who plays the govenor who put aang on trial was used repeatedly through the show and is a pretty prolific actor.


but that’s about it, that are the major characters at least. it makes me wonder if they don’t have much of a budget for voice actors, so they can’t put the effort into training a new actor like we’ve seen in other situations (like: pixar trained several kids, including the voice of kid in UP)—i don’t think many of the people whose voice talent they use were brand spanking new. and if it’s an industry dominated by white folks, then it becomes one of those “never challenged” situations.

but either way, it surprised me too, cuz they’ve been SO good about working with and empowering the artists they work with in korea, and making sure that korean talent is throughout the entire process—it’s surprising that they don’t have access to korean voice talent at the very least…

The voice acting pool is pretty small, and I feel for some reason producing companies don’t feel it necessary to widen the pool, because it’s not like people notice anyway, or something like that. (This is how Jim Cummings is in like almost every cartoon from the 90’s.) It is totally an industry dominated by white folks, but there are POC here and there (Keith Richards, anybody?).

Did you mean David Keith (voice of Goliath)? And yes, from what I understand it’s very hard to break into voice acting b/c it’s a very insular little community. And the POC who do get in tend to be in EVERYTHING because they ain’t lettin’ no one else in!

The two that come to mind right away are Cree Summer, who is almost guaranteed to show up if a character is black and female, and Phil Lamarr, who shows up a lot when a character is black and male. Though interestingly, on the Avengers cartoon he is NOT the voice of Black Panther, but of J.A.R.V.I.S.

I don’t know why the voice acting community is so insular. The fact that it is creates this problematic thing around race. If you don’t have a deep pool to draw from in the first place, then most everyone is going to be white. I’m willing to accept that voice acting is different from other acting and you don’t want to bring in someone random who can’t handle it. But then I think about how all those Disney and Pixar and Dreamworks movies get big name stars who have never done voice acting and they seem to do a fine job and I think: shenanigans are happening here.

Really interesting reading the above, and it’s not something to which I’d ever given much thought, BUT, I just wanted to throw out there the fact that OMG I ONLY JUST NOTICED GEORGE TAKEI VOICED THE LEAD FIRE NATION DOOD IN “IMPRISONED” OMG OMG.

That is all.

How do you not notice George Takei’s mellifluous and measured tones even tho masked by those sinister lines!!!!!

This something we struggle with, too. There is an article on our site on the Asian American actors in Avatar who were also in the East West Players, a theater troupe founded by Mako to make more opportunities for Asian American actors. I think the Avatar cultural consultant really pushed Bryke and Nick to cast more Asian American actors. But it is also interesting to note that after season three they stopped doing cultural consulting (I could be wrong.)

Voice acting is different from live action acting in that no one expects Ash Ketchum or Bart Simpson’s VA to be a preteen boy, and we understand that Dee Bradley Baker is not really a bison. You could argue that voice acting may be more egalitarian by nature since the voice is only part of the character (Korra scratching her butt or making a stinkface at the police chief is not tied into the VA so much as with the animators.)

Even so, this is a valid critique because like any other entertainment media product in America, Avatar is constrained by a system that was launched during a time when America was deeply racist, a system that still carries that legacy today. It is significant that Avatar is a show set in an “Asian fantasy world” but voiced by primarily white VAs and written and created by two brilliant white guys (these two facts were used to argue that the characters were white by our opponents, after all.) This was one of the core issues debated in Racefail’09. I think Avatar is one of the shows that does it right. I like Korra’s VA and I love that the character is brown…but I can’t help but feel a twinge of disappointment that the VA is not First Nations.

Reblogged from juvjuvychan  58 notes

It should be obvious

juvjuvychan:

I don’t understand how some people could NOT understand how important it is that Korra is a WOC on, what is likely to be, a very popular TV show aimed at children and young teens.  How? How do you NOT get the importance of that? 

Having a female protagonist is already a big deal since a majority of female characters  in mainsteam media are still being regulated to secondary characters and love interests. POC are still horribly marginalized in mainstream media.  LOOK AT THE FREAKING AVATAR MOVIE FOR A PRIME EXAMPLE. 

So having a WOC be the protagonist of what is likely to be a popular tv show that will reach a great many people is a HUGE deal for progression.  

I am always going to be upset that some are trying to whitewash Korra or worse make excuses and/or ignore the issue at large. I’m always going to be upset that as a female character some are treating her differently then they would male characters. I won’t simply let those issues slide and be passive about them. 

So when one says “oh who cares what race she is” or “race doesn’t exist in Avatar’verse” you’re not helping the issue, your contributing to it. And that will never be okay. 

WonderCon programming for Avatar: The Last Airbender fans!

Anyone going to WonderCon?   (It’s next weekend, March 16th through 18th, in Anaheim, CA)   There’s a lot of programming available for Avatar: The Last Airbender fans this year. 

CONVENTION FLOOR 

Although Nickelodeon and Dark Horse comics are NOT exhibiting this year, Racebending.com will host our fan table (Booth F-09)  

We’ll have lots of giveaways (past giveaways include stuffed Appas and Momos, pins with Aang and Korra, comic books, etc.) t-shirts for sale, and information about The Legend of Korra.  We’ll also have our interactive photo collage running!

Artists Alley will also boast some A:TLA artists, including Joshua Middleton (AA-093), who is currently working on The Legend of Korra. You’ll also be able to find fan artist DJ ‘Dark Kenjie’ Welch (AA-049) in the alley.

PROGRAMMING

  • “Famous TV Theme Music
    Friday, March 16 5:00-6:00 Room 213
    Composers of popular television theme songs discuss their writing process and their influences to their craft. Charles Fox (The New Adventures of Wonder Woman, Love Boat, Happy Days), Parry Gripp (Buffy the Vampire Slayer), Jeremy Zuckerman & Benjamin Wynn (Avatar the Last Airbender: The Legend of Korra), will discuss their contributions to TV theme music. Attendees will get to see a select clip from the new series The Last Airbender: Legend of Korra. Room 213
  • DC Nation Special Video Presentation and Q&A
    Friday, March 16 5:00-6:00  Room 204
    Avatar: The Last Airbender director Giancarlo Volpe will be on the panel presenting on DC Nation. 
  • "Geek Slant: How the East Meets West
    Saturday, March 17 4:30-5:30  Room 207
    From comics and film to television and new media, Asian Americans have been making their mark on pop culture. Racebending-Media Consumers for Entertainment Equality hosts this no-holds-barred conversation featuring Phil Yu (Angry Asian Man), Jen Wang and Diana Nguyen (Disgrasian), Freddie Wong (YouTube’s freddiew), and other mavens of their industry to discuss the state of Asian Pacific Americans in niche and mainstream media.
  • Comic Arts Conference Session 10: Adaptation and Media”
    Sunday, March 18 2:00-3:00 Room 210 
    Among the many presentations on adaptation will be one on The Last Airbender. Kathryn M. Frank (University of Michigan) discusses the controversy surrounding the casting of M. Night Shyamalan’s The Last Airbender to uncover industry logics regarding casting and the potential success of comics/animation-to-live-action adaptations. 

(Please let us know if we’ve missed anything!)