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Who would you want to see on a panel discussing women superheroes?

We’re putting together a panel for San Diego ComicCon 2014!   Right now we’re envisioning a panel focused on women superheroes and aiming for an all-women panel!    What we definitely want is a lot of intersectionality on the panel— particularly women of color and women who hold multiple intersectional identities!  Women who write novels or comics or webcomics about superheroines!  Women who study transmedia and the depiction of superheroes!  Women who provide cultural commentary on comics and media representation!

This is where we’d love your help!  What would your dream panel on this topic look like?   Who should we invite and who would you like to see?

Reblogged from thartist72  423 notes

Oh yeah, that was the biggest joke of all. I think that there is a general pattern of “white-ifying” everything. Just because they make Heimdall black in the Thor movies doesn’t really make a counterargument. In fact, the amount of what they call “racebending” that goes on in Hollywood is extraordinary. I mean, I have sat down with agents who will tell me straight up, “Listen, you write about Dominicans in New Jersey. We can make an indie film about this, but nobody in Hollywood wants to see anything but white leads.” And so when I heard that they wanted to cast all white characters in Akira, it just really shows you how little the dream factory of our popular culture has caught up with the diverse reality of our present. I mean, the nation in which we live — and the world in which we live — is so extraordinarily more like a future than the futures that we’re being sold on the screen and on television.

By

 Junot Díaz

 

(via thartist72)

Racebending is proud to announce that we will be hosting our first Midwest panel discussion on media representation in comics, Diverse Means for Diverse Worlds at this years C2E2 in Chicago! 
The panel is focused on art and storytelling techniques in comics that allow fantasy worlds to mirror real world diversity. It is presented by an equally diverse roster of panelists whose own work and experience range from webcomics to running comics conventions. The panel presentation will be held on April 27th from 2:45-3:45 in panel room S402 at Chicago’s McCormick Place Convention Center.  Panelists include Gail Simone, Turtel Onli, Gene Ha, Jay Fuller, Ramon K. Perez, and Marjorie M. Liu with moderator Gabe Canada.
About Racebending.com
Racebending.com is an international grassroots organization of media consumers who support entertainment equality. We advocate for underrepresented groups in entertainment media. Since our formation in 2009, we have been dedicated to furthering equal opportunities in Hollywood and beyond.
This website was founded by fans of Avatar: The Last Airbender who were appalled by the casting discrimination that occurred during the production of the The Last Airbender film adaptation. We are now comprised of thousands of supporters in 50 countries around the world. We are a coalition and community dedicated to encouraging fair representation in the media. As a far-reaching movement of media consumers, students, parents, and professionals, we promote just and equal opportunities in the entertainment industry.
About C2E2
The Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo - also known as C2E2 - is a convention spanning the latest and greatest from the worlds of comics, movies, television, toys, anime, manga and video games. Bringing the best of popular culture to Downtown Chicago, C2E2’s show floor is packed with hundreds of exhibitors, panels and autograph sessions giving fans a chance to interact with their favorite creators and screening rooms featuring sneak peeks at films and television shows months before they hit either the big or small screen!

Racebending is proud to announce that we will be hosting our first Midwest panel discussion on media representation in comics, Diverse Means for Diverse Worlds at this years C2E2 in Chicago!

The panel is focused on art and storytelling techniques in comics that allow fantasy worlds to mirror real world diversity. It is presented by an equally diverse roster of panelists whose own work and experience range from webcomics to running comics conventions. The panel presentation will be held on April 27th from 2:45-3:45 in panel room S402 at Chicago’s McCormick Place Convention Center.  Panelists include Gail Simone, Turtel Onli, Gene Ha, Jay Fuller, Ramon K. Perez, and Marjorie M. Liu with moderator Gabe Canada.

About Racebending.com

Racebending.com is an international grassroots organization of media consumers who support entertainment equality. We advocate for underrepresented groups in entertainment media. Since our formation in 2009, we have been dedicated to furthering equal opportunities in Hollywood and beyond.

This website was founded by fans of Avatar: The Last Airbender who were appalled by the casting discrimination that occurred during the production of the The Last Airbender film adaptation. We are now comprised of thousands of supporters in 50 countries around the world. We are a coalition and community dedicated to encouraging fair representation in the media. As a far-reaching movement of media consumers, students, parents, and professionals, we promote just and equal opportunities in the entertainment industry.

About C2E2

The Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo - also known as C2E2 - is a convention spanning the latest and greatest from the worlds of comics, movies, television, toys, anime, manga and video games. Bringing the best of popular culture to Downtown Chicago, C2E2’s show floor is packed with hundreds of exhibitors, panels and autograph sessions giving fans a chance to interact with their favorite creators and screening rooms featuring sneak peeks at films and television shows months before they hit either the big or small screen!

Modern Hollywood and the Ancient East

The 1001 Arabian Nights. The Biblical flood and the family that repopulated the world. The Jewish exodus out of Ancient Egypt. The story of Jesus of Nazareth. The Ancient Egyptian gods Horus, Ra, and Set…

These movie concepts, in development for 2014 and 2015 releases, are based on stories and histories from the Eurocentric concept of the “East” that have captured the Eurocentric imagination. They’re also rare acting opportunities for actors of color that continue to be cast with white actors.

Liam Hemmsworth and Anthony Hopkinswill star as leads in the Arabian Nights.  Russell Crowe stars as the patriarch of the Earth-repopulating family of Noahin what the film claims is a “close adaptation of the Biblical story of Noah’s Ark.” Portuguese actor Diogo Morgado portrays the role of Jesus inSon of God. White Brit Christian Bale plays Moses and white Australian Joel Edgerton plays Ramses II in Exodus. White Scottish, Danish, and Australian actors top the cast of Gods of Egypt portraying Set, Horus, and Ra.

North African, Near Eastern, Middle Eastern, South Asian–they’re already arbitrary cultural classifications. Depending on Hollywood’s purposes, these characters, cultures, and stories are either made white or racialized as a swath of brown…

Read the full article at Racebending.com

Reblogged from fuckyeahgreatplays  491 notes
fuckyeahgreatplays:

So Lantern Theater in Philadelphia has apparently screwed up royally with a racist “Japanese-inspired” Julius Caesar. Makoto Hirano, member of the Team Sunshine Collective and “actual Japanese person,” has penned a great response that should really be rules for keeping any of your shows from being racist.
Lantern Theater has issued this non-apology:

“One of the major goals of Lantern Theater Company has always been to foster dialogue and discussion among our audience. We have a long history of hiring actors of all backgrounds for Shakespeare roles, but our production of Julius Caesar has offended some people, and we want to better understand their concerns. I have reached out personally to Makoto as well as other members of the local theater and Asian American communities and am interested in hearing all points of view. I welcome the opportunity to further discuss diversity and cultural representation in the theater with anyone who has an interest in an open and direct exchange.”

Lantern, guys, you didn’t create a dialogue, you straight-up didn’t have one with ANYONE who could have helped you not make these mistakes, and that’s how you got into this mess.

fuckyeahgreatplays:

So Lantern Theater in Philadelphia has apparently screwed up royally with a racist “Japanese-inspired” Julius Caesar. Makoto Hirano, member of the Team Sunshine Collective and “actual Japanese person,” has penned a great response that should really be rules for keeping any of your shows from being racist.

Lantern Theater has issued this non-apology:

“One of the major goals of Lantern Theater Company has always been to foster dialogue and discussion among our audience. We have a long history of hiring actors of all backgrounds for Shakespeare roles, but our production of Julius Caesar has offended some people, and we want to better understand their concerns. I have reached out personally to Makoto as well as other members of the local theater and Asian American communities and am interested in hearing all points of view. I welcome the opportunity to further discuss diversity and cultural representation in the theater with anyone who has an interest in an open and direct exchange.”

Lantern, guys, you didn’t create a dialogue, you straight-up didn’t have one with ANYONE who could have helped you not make these mistakes, and that’s how you got into this mess.

Reblogged from allerasphinx  138 notes

allerasphinx:

scarlettspeedster:

They didn’t test any white people for the role, so why don’t you look into something before you open your mouth? And before you call me a racist for this crap I’ll have you know my mother was born and raised in South Africa, and my grandmother is black. And before you say I’m a self-hating, white-washed black person, I don’t hate black people at all. I really dig my culture and I love it. 

But when you take the source material and flip it on it’s head you’re going to have people picking it up and being outraged. If you want those characters that are created as minorities to thrive then you need to showcase them. Who knows, this Flash show might be the thing that makes Vibe cool and interesting. Or maybe if they brought in Voodoo or Rene Montoya it might be the thing that lights a fire under that fandom. Rather than taking something that isn’t and trying to tell us it’s better, why don’t they take what’s already there and show it to us in a way that can make you want more of it?

A black Iris West only leads to one thing if this show gets the fans it hopes to: It’ll force a change in the comics eventually. Iris West will never get her own DC title, and as such there isn’t much to be done. Voodoo, the Question, and Vibe, have all had titles before with little interest because no one supported them by buying them. With a show like this you need to showcase the source material to generate interest. With interest you can drum up sales, which NEWSFLASH, is all these companies care about. They don’t give a damn about whether or not a character is white, black, Asian, yellow, purple. All they care about is making a headline to drum up interest to line their pockets with money.

This isn’t about race to them, because to them race is interchangeable, it’s all about the bottom line: 

Making money.

Because no one ever makes casting calls catering to white people and only white people? It’s not like that happens with every major role in Hollywood. Hunger Games? Avatar the Last Airbender? Do any of these ring any bells? Do you think when they were casting the lead male for Flash/Barry Allen they had an open casting call? Do you think they gave everyone a shot? I bet if I somehow procure the casting call, it will say “white male only” and if it doesn’t explicitly say so, it will imply so since there’s a specific type of language used in casting calls that excludes actors of colour. Anything that says “girl next door” or “boy next door” means they’re looking for white people, no matter if it says open casting call. They’ll use certain language to cover their asses, then turn around and cast someone white; Hollywood has absolutely no problem doing this.

Not to mention, that sometimes when there is a casting for an actor of colour like in Drive where the female role was meant for a Latina, a white actress like Carey Mulligan can saunter into that casting and be handed that role no questions asked. An actor of colour would presently never be able to do that.

So you see, there are several ways that Hollywood screws actors of colour and caters to white actors. A casting that specifically looks for black actors to fill roles is fair play considering how unfair the system is in the first place.

But, hey, maybe you’re right. Maybe it’s totally unfair to “cast someone black for the sake of it.” Clearly the casting people went out and just looked for any black person, it’s not like they had to be talented to be cast in the role in the end. It’s totally not possible that they decided to look at a talented group of black actors that never get opportunities in Hollywood because the system’s stacked against them. God forbid they give a few black actors one role out of the thousands that they’re told they’re not right for.

You did sound like an entitled racist nerd; that’s an “opinion” based on what you wrote. 

They didn’t test any white people for a supporting role in a CW series when there are so many other shows on the CW where white actors have a chance of being cast? Wait, let me muster up a single tear for our poor oppressed white brothers and sisters who can’t get ahead in such a system that caters to black people.

Your mother was born and raised in South Africa and your grandmother is black? Congratulations! My grandfather is half white and my great-grandfather was fully white from one of the whitest countries on earth, so as a part white person, I think that gives me the authority to call out a fellow part white person when I think they’re perpetuating oppression.

Apparently you’re in an alternate reality where Hollywood thinks that diversifying will make them more money as opposed to catering the same old white supremacist principles they’ve been catering to for decades. That’s totally the reason why a movie about Egyptian gods has an all black cast as it should…oh wait, no it doesn’t.

A franchise wants to make money? I wouldn’t have guessed. So what if they think that with all these demographic changes, they should start catering to realistic racial demographics? So what if they finally realise that if people don’t see themselves on screen, they’ll take their money elsewhere? If money’s what it takes to make people wake the hell up and stop using the excuse that actors of colour aren’t viable because they won’t bring in the dollars, then it’s going to have to do for now. 

All these tears over a racebent love interest when the main character is still a straight white dude.

irresistible-revolution:

graphitetroll:

irresistible-revolution:

literally how do we still have people who think there r white ppl in ATLA

how?????

youre kidding.

i wish i was

Because we’re still conditioned to see whiteness when it isn’t there.  Because in American media, characters are considered white until proven otherwise.   Because whiteness is viewed as default personhood without labels.  

    thetwerkingthomas asked
    I've heard some people say that a white person cosplaying a character that happens to be non-white is culture appropriation, what do you say?

    Answer:

    Uhhh I say that there are hundreds of posts in the tags for this, as well as on a ton of other blogs and that this is not a question that PoC should have to constantly be answering.

    Not just because a ton has already been said on the subject and is easily accessible to anyone with the internet resources and literacy level to learn about it, but because whether or not a white person decides to cosplay a character of color should not be based on the opinion of some person of color you know of from the internet.   It should be based on an informed decision you have made using the context of the character you are cosplaying, your own knowledge of racism, and your own ethical judgement.

Reblogged from fuckcolonialism  271 notes

I am aware of the lack of representation of Native Americans in TV and movies, and when Arnaud Desplechin brought the idea of this movie to me, my instinctive reaction was: Why me? Because I really do believe that Native Americans could have played the part better, different… It could have been done.

But there is a money issue in doing movies, and the fact that I have a career created the chance of the movie being made. That is a fact of life at this moment in time. So, when I read the story, I just felt it was a really strong story that should be out there. And, with all due respect, I dared to do it. There have been actors playing outside their groups; it is a tradition in acting. In the history of theater, even women were played by men.

By

Benicio Del Toro’s justification for playing James Picard, a real life Blackfoot Native American veteran, in the film “Jimmy P”.   Read the full interview at Indian Country Today. (via racebending)

i consider myself a fan of benicio’s acting, but just because something’s a “tradition” doesn’t mean it needs to be preserved. and the whole “i’m more famous than any native actor, which is why i kind of HAD to play this part” is really tired and counterproductive. this could’ve been a great opportunity for a native american actor to gain notoriety! benicio sympathizes with our lack of representation, but as long as “money issues” and actors like him are prioritized over native actors for these roles, the situation’s never going to change. 

(via fuckcolonialism)