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    anightvaleintern asked
    I'm white but my brother married into a Latin@ family to a woman who already had a child who was five when she came into my life and I consider her my niece. As a teen I'd never really thought about there being no WoC princesses till I watched her argue with and then cry when she found out Jasmine was not Mexican. :( She's thirteen now and I'm really desperate for a Latina princess before it means little or nothing to her.

    Answer:

    In a weird way, Princess Jasmine was a stand in for all young girls of color in the 1990s…

Reblogged from racebentdisney  19,038 notes

Okay, but it’s not just about getting paid to prance around in a princess costume

racebentdisney:

amaninyc:

lyrique86:

Let me tell you a story.  Once at a party, I had all the little girls sitting around me and I was asking them about their favorite parts of all the princess movies.  The birthday girl was sitting next to me, and tells me, “Princess, your skin is the same color as mine.”  I smile and agree, and try to move the game along, but she interrupts and says, “Your skin is brown and you’re a princess.  It’s the same color as mine, but you’re a princess.”

“Well, if my skin is brown and your skin is brown, and I’m a princess, then you must be a princess too.” I tell her.  And then I spent the next 10 minutes assuring all the black girls at the party that yes, they have lovely skin and yes, they can be princesses with me.

This happens at most of the parties I go to.  I have had my arm stroked, my hair patted, my skin color commented on more times than I can remember. I am not simply hired out to entertain a bunch of cute little girls dressed in poofy skirts who want to play with a big girl in a poofier skirt.  I am hired out because I am an affirmation. For these little black girls (and boys!  I’ve dazzled a few of them too) Princess Tiana is proof that for once, they can be special BECAUSE of the color of their skin, not IN SPITE OF.

Adding some of her pictures for emphasis.

We’ve featured pictures of this lovely Tiana before, but I wanted to add this post to the blog as well :)

Reblogged from zukosfieldtrips  3,913 notes
zukosfieldtrips:

ursulatheseabitchh:

waltdisneyconfessionsrage:

maymaisiemae:

waltdisneyconfessions:

"Tiana’s concept art is so gorgeous. It’s funny that Disney didn’t put more effort into her hair when they were so proud of their work on Rapunzel and Merida’s hair…I’d wonder why but it’s probably the same reason that the one black princess is the princess that’s a frog for 85% of the movie"

So, you think that Disney is racist, and are so racist that they think that black people can’t have loose hair? Uh, no. Rapunzel’s hair is a HUGE part of her story and character development, of course they’d work hard on that. Merida’s hair was a huge factor of her in the advertisements, and is kind of a metaphor for her wild personality. As for Tiana, I doubt, I so highly doubt that her hair is up for most of the movie because Disney is racist. Tiana keeping her hair up shows her personality too, her hard-working personality, as it shows that she doesn’t want loose hair in her eyes or hair falling in her food when she cooks. And also, Merida and Rapunzel are CGI, and CGI hair usually has way more detail than 2D hair.
Finally, I still get annoyed when people hate on how Tiana is a frog for most of the movie. I honestly don’t see the racism in that, and I think it’s as good a story for their first black heroine as any.

Black hair (particularly black women’s hair) is stigmatized in Western society as dirty, or unkempt. Most ethnic styles of hair are frowned upon, such as Afros, twists, braids, puffs, and dreadlocks.  This is subliminally carried into Princess and the Frog with the artists choosing (operative term) to keep Tiana’s hair back or up during her few minutes as a human on screen. There’s honestly no reason she could not have had her hair down, especially near the end.
And while computer animation can give you more details (one of the major pros of the medium), that doesn’t magic away the fact that the animators didn’t want to animate Tiana’s hair beyond a few bobs of her ponytail. Detail is not the issue here. Past Disney women whose hair also did not factor into the plots of their stories had very competently animated hair. And those were all hand-drawn.




So the medium has nothing to do with competent animation.
And I guess it’s good enough that the first black heroine (and only one as far as Disney is concerned) is not even human for nearly 85% of the her movie? Yeah, because that’s a respectful portrayal of a black woman: to have her be a frog for the majority of her film. And that’s especially memorable compared to her white counterparts whose screen time is never compromised and are able to keep their humanity throughout them.

INVISIBLE DIVERSITY IS NOT REAL DIVERSITY.
Tiana has the most lazily animated hair of any disney princess. It’s in a bun, it stays in the bun. No movement, no body whatsoever. Any disney heroine, period. And to suggest that that doesn’t have anything to do behind the stigma surrounding black hair then you aren’t paying attention.


Also, if you do a Google image search for “natural hair updos” or “natural hair styles” you will see plenty of options that would keep Tiana’s hair out of the way when she’s cooking.

zukosfieldtrips:

ursulatheseabitchh:

waltdisneyconfessionsrage:

maymaisiemae:

waltdisneyconfessions:

"Tiana’s concept art is so gorgeous. It’s funny that Disney didn’t put more effort into her hair when they were so proud of their work on Rapunzel and Merida’s hair…I’d wonder why but it’s probably the same reason that the one black princess is the princess that’s a frog for 85% of the movie"

So, you think that Disney is racist, and are so racist that they think that black people can’t have loose hair? Uh, no. Rapunzel’s hair is a HUGE part of her story and character development, of course they’d work hard on that. Merida’s hair was a huge factor of her in the advertisements, and is kind of a metaphor for her wild personality. As for Tiana, I doubt, I so highly doubt that her hair is up for most of the movie because Disney is racist. Tiana keeping her hair up shows her personality too, her hard-working personality, as it shows that she doesn’t want loose hair in her eyes or hair falling in her food when she cooks. And also, Merida and Rapunzel are CGI, and CGI hair usually has way more detail than 2D hair.

Finally, I still get annoyed when people hate on how Tiana is a frog for most of the movie. I honestly don’t see the racism in that, and I think it’s as good a story for their first black heroine as any.

Black hair (particularly black women’s hair) is stigmatized in Western society as dirty, or unkempt. Most ethnic styles of hair are frowned upon, such as Afros, twists, braids, puffs, and dreadlocks.  This is subliminally carried into Princess and the Frog with the artists choosing (operative term) to keep Tiana’s hair back or up during her few minutes as a human on screen. There’s honestly no reason she could not have had her hair down, especially near the end.

And while computer animation can give you more details (one of the major pros of the medium), that doesn’t magic away the fact that the animators didn’t want to animate Tiana’s hair beyond a few bobs of her ponytail. Detail is not the issue here. Past Disney women whose hair also did not factor into the plots of their stories had very competently animated hair. And those were all hand-drawn.

So the medium has nothing to do with competent animation.

And I guess it’s good enough that the first black heroine (and only one as far as Disney is concerned) is not even human for nearly 85% of the her movie? Yeah, because that’s a respectful portrayal of a black woman: to have her be a frog for the majority of her film. And that’s especially memorable compared to her white counterparts whose screen time is never compromised and are able to keep their humanity throughout them.

INVISIBLE DIVERSITY IS NOT REAL DIVERSITY.

Tiana has the most lazily animated hair of any disney princess. It’s in a bun, it stays in the bun. No movement, no body whatsoever. Any disney heroine, period. And to suggest that that doesn’t have anything to do behind the stigma surrounding black hair then you aren’t paying attention.

Also, if you do a Google image search for “natural hair updos” or “natural hair styles” you will see plenty of options that would keep Tiana’s hair out of the way when she’s cooking.

Reblogged from stitchomancy  1,919 notes

stichomancy:

At nineteen I cried while watching the Princess and the Frog in theaters.

I cried. Finally there was a Disney princess that looked like me and mine. She had hair like mine. A nose like my nieces’ noses. Her skin was dark brown and she was beautiful and clever and determined. Tiana meant so much to me and I was grown by the time she came along.

To my nieces, she meant even more. They had a princess that they could play as without their white friends shutting them down because “Belle/Cinderella/ wasn’t brown”. They had a princess that looked like them and that told them that they could be a princess themselves.

And I want that for everyone. I want everyone to be able to look at the media they consume and go “holy crap, this character is reminds me of people i know or people I’m related to” because of their culture and their skin color combined, not just because they’re snarky or they’re into books. 

Representation is so important and I will fight to the death to make sure that people get the positive representation that they deserve just by existing in this world.

    just-a-simple-monk asked
    After getting angry for the billionth time about how disney doesn't even have a hispanic princess, I realized something: Disney can't even paint with all the colors of the wind.

    Answer:

    redhead-oblivion:

    threelittlemonkeybutts:

    fuatino:

    racebending:

    rimshot

    PPPPFPFFF

    Look it can’t even paint with more than one, it just splatters the other colors into a giant mess and tries to pass it off as painting.

    Where’s that post that points out Rapunzel was Disney’s first white princess in 20 years??
    While it’s true there’s not representation of every ethnicity yet, it’s not true that they only “paint with one color.” And I gotta say I find it ironic that the quote used for this reference was sang by a Native American (hint: not white) princess.
    Bottom line: I’d love to see Disney do a Hispanic princess, a mixed race couple, a movie where the princess is the one saving the prince, a same-sex couple as much as the next person. But making false claims about the diversity in their movies isn’t going to get us there.

    I assume that post is hiding in embarrassment because even if Rapunzel was Disney’s first white princess in 20 years (not withstanding with the pile of Cinderella sequels that home video spat out, and the giant castles that Disney has erected to memorialize three different white princesses, etc.) that’s a pretty sad statistic.

    Sure, we went 20 years without a new white princess. Let’s be thoughtful about this:

    • Tiana was the first African American Disney princess in 72 years and the only African American princess ever.

    • Mulan was the first East Asian Disney princess in 61 years and the only East Asian princess ever.
    • Pocahontas was the first Native American princess in 58 years and the only Native American princess ever.
    • Jasmine was the first Middle Eastern-analogue princess in 55 years, the first princess of color in 55 years, and the only Middle Eastern-esque since.
    • These four, plus Princess Kida, are the only princesses who are not white.

    So this argument that ooh, Rapunzel was the first white Disney princess in 20 years? When there were six white princesses before her? Rapunzel has only been out since 2010, and since then Disney has added THREE more white princesses.

    That’s four white princesses in the past three years.

    Disney can crown four princesses, all of the same same race, in three years, when they are white.

    Yet, as your own fancy statistic attests, it took them six times as long to crown four princesses of color, of different races—each from films with questionable racial stereotypes.

    Trying to minimize Disney’s terrible track record isn’t going to get us there either.

Reblogged from storybrookemirror  3,828 notes
storybrookemirror:


Things will get a bit hairy on Once Upon a Time when the ABC drama introduces its take on Rapunzel.
And filling the iconic role, TVLine has learned exclusively, will be ill-fated Originals witch Alexandra Metz.
Metz will make her debut in the 14th episode of Season 3 — aka soon into the second half, which premieres March 9 — and though nothing at this time is confirmed, there is always the option for additional future appearances.

[x]

storybrookemirror:

Things will get a bit hairy on Once Upon a Time when the ABC drama introduces its take on Rapunzel.

And filling the iconic role, TVLine has learned exclusively, will be ill-fated Originals witch Alexandra Metz.

Metz will make her debut in the 14th episode of Season 3 — aka soon into the second half, which premieres March 9 — and though nothing at this time is confirmed, there is always the option for additional future appearances.

[x]

Reblogged from selchieproductions  350 notes
    ileikturtles asked
    Hi, I have a school assignment about Disney’s discriminatory adaptation, Frozen, and as my final piece chose to do a redesign of some characters, how many depending on my progress by the deadline. The more I read about how offensively wrong Disney got this, the more I am daunted by this task, as I don’t want to make any stupid or insulting mistakes. I'm running out of letters now but could you tell me a bit about where to start learning about the saami culture as relating to the original story?

    Answer:

    selchieproductions:

    Hi there, the original story was written by Hans Christian Andersen, the same Danish author that wrote ‘the Little Mermaid’ and as such it is not a Saami story at all. 

    In the original story however, the main character Gerda meets a Saami woman who helps her finding her way to the Snow Queen’s palace by writing a message on a piece of dried fish that she tells Gerda to bring to a Finnish woman in the far north of Finland. This part of the story is a mere paragraph long, so the only reason why Disney has chosen to call Kristoff Saami is to add a bit of exotic flair to the film itself. 

    Disney’s understanding of our many and different cultures is non-existent, they haven’t used any Saami advisors in the process of making the film, Kristoff is a vendor of ice with a pet reindeer and the only inclusion of a Saami voice in the film is through the opening song, which is a yoik written by a South Saami composer. This yoik is not performed by Saami artists, however, so it’s not really a Saami addition to the film as much as it is a tune chosen because of how exotic it sounds. In many ways Eatnemen vuelie is not chosen because Disney wants the film to give Saami a place, it’s been chosen because it sounds like a chant not all too dissimilar from the opening song in Pocahontas.

    In other words, changing Kristoff’s outfit from the horrible mismatch of things he’s currently wearing and that Disney presents as being Saami to something authentically Saami would be equally problematic because he is not Saami. Making Kristoff Saami is a way for Disney to claim that they have included minorities in their stories, rather than telling yet another boring, white Western story that has nothing new to add to the wealth of children’s films out there. His Saaminess is a tokenistic way of showing how inclusive Disney is while not being inclusive or diverse at all.

Reblogged from theroguefeminist  755 notes
theroguefeminist:

waltdisneyconfessionsrage:

this-is-my-viewpoint:

waltdisneyconfessions:

“I love studying fairy-tales, and would love nothing more than to write the screenplays for future Disney animated films using stories from other countries. However, I worry that, as a white female, even though I will research like crazy, any attempt I do will be seen as racist or wrong, and picked apart. I’m scared that I won’t do the stories justice.”

OP has a point. Perhaps we are being so harsh on any Disney movie WITH a PoC main that they are scared to have another one. Having a PoC main character is still considered a gutsy move in hollywood (sad but true). It’s possible they would rather go white because they can’t offend them on their culture.
Let’s use Frozen as an example. 
So say they’re choosing skin colors. Personally, I would always have Elsa be white, for no other reason that a “Snow Queen” makes me think of someone with exceptionally pale skin. So if Elsa is white, unless you have some thingy about the magic making her white, Anna would be white too.
So who else among the main cast could they change?
Duke of Weaselton/Hans? Tumblr would immediately call it the stereotype of PoC’s only as bad guys. 
Kristoff? Than one could work. (Though someone would probably attack it for have a poor, orphan PoC again).
Servants who take care of Anna/Elsa? Brings up slavery metaphors…
~~~
Just thinking out loud here.


You do realize that there are indigenous cultures of non-whites that live in cold climates, right? Snowy climates and white people are not exclusive.
And you seeing a Snow Queen being automatically white just shows how you how narrow your view is. There is no reason that an adaptation of The Snow Queen or even Frozen could have been done with other cultures in mind. Heck, it’s already been done.
And the reason Hollywood defaults to white is that it sees white as the default race/default experience. Hollywood could care less if they offend people of color. Examples: Johnny Depp as Tonto in The Lone Ranger, Benedict Cumberbatch as Khan Noonien Singh in Star Trek: Into Darkness, and Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss Everdeen in The Hunger Games. These are all examples of white-washing and erasure, another way that Hollywood removes the narratives of people of color in order to sell it to a mass audience rather than staying true to the source material.
Plus, excluding people because you don’t want to offend them is just as bad as excluding them based on any prejudice. You’re still discriminating based on the fact that they are different and you’re not even trying to meet other people on their level. You would rather cower on top of your pedestal and keep things just the way they are for your own convenience.

the proper reaction to being afraid of offending people by including people with different experiences than yours is putting in the work and research and effort to AVOID offending people and doing the characters justice by making them multifaceted and human not stereotypical—not erasing them entirely. jeez

theroguefeminist:

waltdisneyconfessionsrage:

this-is-my-viewpoint:

waltdisneyconfessions:

I love studying fairy-tales, and would love nothing more than to write the screenplays for future Disney animated films using stories from other countries. However, I worry that, as a white female, even though I will research like crazy, any attempt I do will be seen as racist or wrong, and picked apart. I’m scared that I won’t do the stories justice.”

OP has a point. Perhaps we are being so harsh on any Disney movie WITH a PoC main that they are scared to have another one. Having a PoC main character is still considered a gutsy move in hollywood (sad but true). It’s possible they would rather go white because they can’t offend them on their culture.

Let’s use Frozen as an example. 

So say they’re choosing skin colors. Personally, I would always have Elsa be white, for no other reason that a “Snow Queen” makes me think of someone with exceptionally pale skin. So if Elsa is white, unless you have some thingy about the magic making her white, Anna would be white too.

So who else among the main cast could they change?

Duke of Weaselton/Hans? Tumblr would immediately call it the stereotype of PoC’s only as bad guys. 

Kristoff? Than one could work. (Though someone would probably attack it for have a poor, orphan PoC again).

Servants who take care of Anna/Elsa? Brings up slavery metaphors…

~~~

Just thinking out loud here.

You do realize that there are indigenous cultures of non-whites that live in cold climates, right? Snowy climates and white people are not exclusive.

And you seeing a Snow Queen being automatically white just shows how you how narrow your view is. There is no reason that an adaptation of The Snow Queen or even Frozen could have been done with other cultures in mind. Heck, it’s already been done.

And the reason Hollywood defaults to white is that it sees white as the default race/default experience. Hollywood could care less if they offend people of color. Examples: Johnny Depp as Tonto in The Lone Ranger, Benedict Cumberbatch as Khan Noonien Singh in Star Trek: Into Darkness, and Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss Everdeen in The Hunger Games. These are all examples of white-washing and erasure, another way that Hollywood removes the narratives of people of color in order to sell it to a mass audience rather than staying true to the source material.

Plus, excluding people because you don’t want to offend them is just as bad as excluding them based on any prejudice. You’re still discriminating based on the fact that they are different and you’re not even trying to meet other people on their level. You would rather cower on top of your pedestal and keep things just the way they are for your own convenience.

the proper reaction to being afraid of offending people by including people with different experiences than yours is putting in the work and research and effort to AVOID offending people and doing the characters justice by making them multifaceted and human not stereotypical—not erasing them entirely. jeez

Reblogged from medievalpoc  12,893 notes

medievalpoc:

boilingheart:

medievalpoc:

feministdisney:

bigscarytiger:

feministdisney:

(someone erased my original captioning, but it read “The Disney Princesses tell it like it is.”)

bigscarytiger:

jonnyornonny:

ethicsinadvertising:

Great little comic on (lacking) diversity in Disney media

So many conflicting ideas on my head about this.
Against: FUCK OFF! IT’S A CHILDREN’S FILM AND BEFORE REPUNZEL WE HAD TWO DECADES OF POC PRINCESSES! TWO. DECADES. Also, both films are set in places without poc in them anyway :/ sorry. Also, merida is a Pixar Hero(ine) NOT a Disney Princess, and I will argue that point to the grave.
For: yeah, poc should be more represented in all media. Why go back on two decades worth of progress? Regardless of fantasy setting, some historical accuracy could at least be attempted.

What Jonny said. One girl on here was hitting a rage cause there were no poc in Brave. Brave is set in 10th century Scotland. There were no poc there at that time. Relax your balls and enjoy the movie.

going back through Brave stuff posted months or years ago is amazing. Just look at the high quality of commentary people added to pictures that blatantly address their point. Like how do you even manage to do that

(also “two decades”… what. As if white characters weren’t there in huge numbers at the same time? Also, simply having characters throughout a span of time doesn’t mean a group is represented enough… as is obvious via many recent films…)

The pictures aren’t addressing my viewpoint for Brave, though. It is historically accurate to not show PoC in the movie because there weren’t any PoC living there until the UK began slavery with people from India and then eventually Africa, and Pixar got condemned on Tumblr for keeping to that. Surely if you feel adding a PoC character is an obligation and not because they’re a part of the story is just as racist as deliberately leaving them out or making them white when they should be included in the story?

And you can’t compare the historical (in)accuracy with the use of magic (a character being transformed into a bear) seriously, how can anyone think that’s a valid comparison?

it actually did address your point but you are, I guess, so sure that slavery was the only way that PoC could get there besides an extensive historical worldwide trade network originating out of both the continents of Africa and Asia, that you didn’t bother to look up the point indicated in image 3. I honestly find your ignorance intentional because I know damn well that people have replied to your reblog with the blog medieval PoC, which, if you search through, has referenced Brave and Scotland multiple times. 

Your complete lack of understanding of the past is exactly the reason that diversity is necessary- you can’t imagine a world where PoC might be present as non-slaves, as people with agency outside of what the British empire dictated, because the media you’ve been exposed to throughout your life has never presented that to you as an option…

I also, no, don’t see how including PoC, even if it’s done as an “obligation” because you can’t wrap your mind around them being a natural part of a story, is as racist as often excluding them or misrepresenting them in media. It is likely that certain people will continue to see their presence as “an obligation” so long as white narratives continue to be seen as an acceptable default…

I’m also not sure why you think chameleons and magical bears are somehow acceptable inclusions when PoC aren’t even though they actually could be there historically but this has been gone over so many times like it’s seriously right there in the images that idk why it was even put as a point.

I went ahead and bolded the parts of these responses that once again show that “historical accuracy” is only important to white people when it comes to casting MODERN MEDIA and excluding people of color from films.

Despite the historical fact that there is documented presence of people of color in Scotland since Classical times, through the Middle Ages, and into modern history.

During the Roman occupation of Scotland, there were over 260 camps of Roman soldiers, the archeological remains of which are visible from the air. The sheer amount of manpower sent into Scotland to try and subdue it grows ever larger as more investigations into these sites is conducted.

In fact, the rather famous disappearance of the IX Hispana Roman Legion is still being investigated, but analysis of primary sources shows that after a bloody defeat, the survivors may have just become part of the population of Scotland. All of this happened around 100 A.D.

Hispania, the origin of the Legion, was under Carthiginian Influence until the Punic Wars almost 100 years later, and on this map you can see the pre-Punic War sphere of Carthaginian influence:

image

In fact, I recently posted an interactive map that demonstrates just how easy and fast travel was in the days of the Roman Empire.

Going to the Middle Ages, we have Kenneth III, King of Scots from 997 to 1005 , also known as “Kenneth the Brown” whose race is still tiresomely debated in certain circles. There is no conclusive “proof” of his race because the racial categories we have today did not exist then. And of course, the former Romans living and working in Scotland at the time would have no written record of their activities or appearance because no one cared.

Once we get into the High Medieval and “Renaissance” period, written records of many specifically Black people in important royal circles. These records are a part of the UK government’s accessible to the public website:

James was a popular, fun-loving king with many interests. Many Black Moors were present at his court. Some worked as servants or (possibly) slaves, but others seem to have been invited guests or musicians. We know that he courted Margaret with lute and clavichord recitals and took her out hunting and playing sports.

After their marriage, the king’s Lord High Treasurer’s accounts provide numerous entries to show how much he enjoyed lively entertainment, employing foreign minstrels from Italy and elsewhere. King James was generous to all kinds of people, including Black Moors, as the following entries from the Treasurer’s accounts demonstrate:

  • To celebrate Shrove Tuesday in 1505, several Africans including a 'taubronar' (drummer) and a choreographer were present in Edinburgh. Twelve dancers (including Italians) performed in specially made black-and-white costumes costing £13 2s 10d. Was this the origin of Morris (Moorish) dancing?
  • In 1504-5 the ‘Moryen’ taubronar was paid 28 shillings to allow his taubroun (drum) to be painted.
  • James bought a horse at a cost of £4 4s for this drummer, who accompanied him when he toured his northern domains.

Moor women were also mentioned in the Treasurer’s accounts. It is unclear whether or not they were servants, since they were showered with items such as gowns of satin, ribbons, slippers and gloves, paid for by the king.

Entries that refer to Moor women include:

  • 'Blak Elene' or 'Elen More' was given five French crowns in 1512.
  • A ‘blak madin’ who attended Queen Margaret was given four-and-a-quarter ells (just over five yards) of French russet.
  • 'Blak Margaret' was given a gown costing 48s in 1513.
  • 'Two blak ladies' staying at the Scottish Court were presented with 10 French crowns as a New Year gift at a cost of £7.
  • In 1527, one item simply said ’ to Helenor, the blak moir - 60 shillings’ .

You can see that the primary sources are included:

image

I think it’s worthwhile to ask ourselves, why is bigscarytiger so very confident in asserting:

It is historically accurate to not show PoC in the movie because there weren’t any PoC living there until the UK began slavery with people from India and then eventually Africa…

This is the effect that the history taught in our classrooms has on real people.

People who feel supremely confident in saying, “you can’t have anyone who looks like you in our movie because you didn’t exist, and when you did it was just as slaves”.

Whitewashing history affects the present and the future.

How about we just sit back and enjoy the FICTIONAL MOVIES created for Entertainment, not History Class. These are both good movies that took a lot of time and skill, so instead of arguing about all this stuff and degrading the creators, appreciate the hard work put in this.

Because consuming fiction and fictional media directly improves empathy.

Because there is a large gap in measurable empathy felt for white people and empathy felt for people of color, especially Black people.

Because young people who read about VAMPIRES identified with VAMPIRES, and young people who read about WIZARDS identified with WIZARDS.

The lack of representation of people of color in popular media leads to a lack of empathy for people of color that directly impacts our lives:

Silverstein reviews research that shows that the racial empathy gap has real world consequences: undertreatment of pain (even in children) and, yes, harsher sentences for African Americans convicted of crimes.

Reblogged from briecheesie  1,237 notes

Why Diversity in Media is Important: A “White-Washed” Latina’s Story

boocheesie:

I am a full-blooded Latina, who happened to be raised in an affluent and mostly white community. I can pass for many races (I’ve gotten everything from “Dark” Italian to Egyptian to Arabic, even though my ancestry traces mostly to the native peoples of the Caribbean), and so I have only rarely suffered any sort of racism related to being a Latina. I’ve even been rewarded for my heritage, because most Hispanic scholarships are merit-based, and I’m intelligent and was raised privileged enough to excel in school; I even had Ivy League schools show interest in me (and I know my ethnicity was taken into consideration there, because my white peers received no such letters).

My point is that I might as well have white-privilege - I’ve identified more with the “privileged white culture” all my life, after all. I’ve joked about being “the whitest Latina in the world” and I’ve identified with white heroes in television and books and movies and had no real problem that there weren’t any Latina heroes that looked like me.

A few months ago, I stumbled upon the character of Miss America, from Marvel’s Young Avengers, and everything changed.

Read More

Reblogged from raptorific  25,975 notes

raptorific:

wrenspaperwings:

feminist-space:

raptorific:

Seriously, it surprises me that people still don’t get that “whitewashing” doesn’t just mean “taking a character of color and turning them white,” but also applies to “focusing disproportionately on the stories of white people,” “glossing over or altering…

I kinda feel though that for the times, the princess’ are actually a wider spread than you’re making it sound. Yes their skin is white but theyre of different nationalities. German English French American Scottish ect. Just because the countries main population of the time when the story was written was white isnt really the fault of the tale. I mean you don’t go to African stories and myths expecting to see white people and have them be culturally diverse. Same with any other ethnicity

(Also with frozen, the upper frozen countries are whiter than white because the pigment is bleached from extended exposure to cold temperatures encouraged them not to go outside and produce melatonin which gives skin its pigment hence the white skin. Also because shes an ice fairy thing.))

That’s the thing. I go to European folk tales and myths expecting to see European people, who are predominately white (although there have been people of color in Europe for longer than white people, because there were no white people before Africans migrated to Europe, and commerce and immigration have been pretty vibrant between the two places since then)

I also go to African folk tales and myths and expect to see African people, and when I go to Asian folk tales and myths I expect to see Asian people, and when I go to Native American folk tales and myths, I expect to see Native American people, and so on for every geographical region and its respective predominate ethnic group.

Except that’s the thing. I don’t go to African stories and myths expecting to see white people. Disney doesn’t go to African stories and myths, full-stop. 

Disney goes to European folk tales and uses a cast of white people, like you might expect in that region and time period. Then, they go to European folk tales and use a cast of white people, like you might expect in that region and time period. Then, they go to European folk tales and use a cast of white people, like you might expect in that region and time period. And then, they go to European folk tales and use a cast of white people, like you might expect in that region and time period. 

The problem is not that the cast of any given individual movie isn’t diverse enough. The problem is that Disney continually chooses to set their stories in western and northern Europe (conveniently, where “all the characters are white” is plausible).

They might just be “being accurate to the story’s time period and location,” but the thing is, they choose the time period and location, and time after time, they always seem to choose stories written by and exclusively featuring white people. 

Yeah, if they made movies set in Africa or Asia or pre-colonial Australia or pre-colonial Americas, the characters in those movies would all be African or Asian or whatever culture is indigenous to the story’s setting. The problem is that they don’t really do that. In the “Princess” collection, they have two movies set in America, one set in Asia, and one set in a made-up country that is so dissimilar to any culture that has ever existed that the closest location I can give for it is “somewhere below Russia.” Then they have eight movies set in northern/western Europe, for a total of nine white princesses who.

Of course, those nine princesses are sometimes French, sometimes Danish, sometimes German, et cetera. There’s a lot of different nationalities amongst the white princesses.

However, amongst the Asian princess, there is one nationality: Chinese. Amongst the Black princess, there is one nationality: American. Amongst the native American princess, there is one nationality: Powhatan. Amongst the Arab princess, there is less than one nationality, because Agrabah bears almost no resemblance to any one place that ever existed. 

Do you see the problem? The white princesses, plural, have a great deal of diversity in their nationalities, in their appearances, in their personalities and attitudes. The princesses of color get no such diversity, because there is only one of each race.

  • The only Asian princess is Mulan, who’s from China.
  • The only Native American princess is Pocahontas, who’s Powhatan.
  • The only Black princess is Tiana, who’s American.
  • The only Middle-Eastern princess is Jasmine, who’s from Agrabah.
  • The only white princesses are Snow White who’s from Germany, and Cinderella who’s French, and Aurora who’s maybe French or German or British, and Ariel who’s from the ocean but moves to Denmark, and Belle who’s French, and Rapunzel who’s German, and Merida who’s Scottish, and Anna who’s Scandinavian, and Elsa who’s Scandinavian. 

And that’s kind of the issue. White people already have seven princess from various parts of Europe. Every other race (note: race, not nationality) has one princess, maximum, but Disney still insists on giving white people an eighth and ninth helping in one go while everybody else is still waiting on firsts and seconds

And that is what people mean when they say it’s whitewashing. 

Yeah, if they made movies set in Africa or Asia or pre-colonial Australia or pre-colonial Americas, the characters in those movies would all be African or Asian or whatever culture is indigenous to the story’s setting. The problem is that they don’t really do that. 

It’s actually more problematic and racist than even that.   Disney has set movies in areas with a lot of people of color like Africa and Australia—and they still feature white people—look at Tarzan, The Rescuers Down Under, etc.

Reblogged from reservoircat  405 notes

I’m just goint to say this because I don’t understand why people are saying what they’re saying.

reservoircat:

faeriviera:

reverseracism:

fiore-della-luna:

When I was a child, I liked Belle because she was loving, because she liked reading, was willing to just go out and do something random and adventurous, and because she was a strong minded lady.

I Did Not go “Oh, I relate to her because she is white and has brown hair”.

Children don’t give a damn about skin color, unless You Teach them too. Racism and discrimination (whether the action or focusing on it) is Taught, people are not born with it.

Read More

"colored"

ew

And also

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The lack of representation can affect children more than you know.

If I see one more person trying to argue that kids don’t see race, and therefore racial representation in the media doesn’t matter, I’m gonna start praying for those people to feel like they have to sneeze for the rest of their lives.

Like seriously, I’m going to be honest. I did like Belle because she was pale with brown hair. Cause that’s what I looked like. As a small girl, it was very important to me to have a role model that looked like me.

Therefore, it boggles my mind when people say that representation in popular media like Disney doesn’t matter. Hell, I got super upset as a child because most Barbies only came in blonde. I cannot even begin to imagine what it felt like to be a young girl of color and my only options be one or two obviously white Barbies that were painted brown and had their hair crimped badly, or like only Mulan or something. 

Representation for children is so, so super important; the images children identify with when they are young is what they model themselves on for the rest of their lives. And we are cheating all girls, especially girls of color with what we have to offer now.