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    ilovenotcamping asked
    THANK YOU for putting on the Super heroine panel!! It was an amazing, empowering experience and EASILY my favorite of SDCC this year! The panelists were fantastic and all the questions genuine and thought provoking. Thank you again for giving us such an wonderful opportunity to come together and discus such an interesting and VITAL topic!

    Answer:

    Thanks for attending!   We were thrilled to have such amazing panelists this year and feel reinvigorated for next year.   A video will be up eventually.  

    There are plans in the works for a panel at NYCC…

    -M

Reblogged from seananmcguire  3,841 notes

The fake geek girl may not be a real thing, but her shadow is long, and since people started claiming to have seen her, the rest of us have been accused of being her with increasing frequency.

seananmcguire:

So it’s been a little more than a week since my glorious return from the San Diego International Comic Convention, where I saw cool things, met cool people, and learned that “Hell” is another word for “being on the SDCC exhibit floor in a wheelchair.”  I also contracted a horrific cold, and have been fighting my way back to the semblance of health, which is why my relative radio silence on the subject.  But that’s neither here nor there: that’s just framework and excuses.  Here’s what happened.

Leading up to SDCC, basically every woman I talked to expressed the fear of being “cred checked” at least once.  The fake geek girl may not be a real thing, but her shadow is long, and since people started claiming to have seen her, the rest of us have been accused of being her with increasing frequency.  She is the geek urban legend, the prowling, predatory female who’s just there to take up precious space/time/swag with her girly girlish girliness, and she’s like The Thing From Outer Space—a creature with no face and every face, AT THE SAME TIME.

I attended SDCC and similar shows for years before anyone said “Gasp!  Some of these geek girls ARE TOTALLY FAKE!” and I started getting my geek credentials checked.  Since that began, I have been forced to defend my knowledge of horror movies, the X-Men, zombie literature, the Resident Evil franchise, Doctor Who, and My Little Pony.

Let’s pause a moment and just think about that.  Men—adult men—have asked me to defend my knowledge of and right to be a fan of My Little motherfucking Pony.  My first fandom, the fandom that is arguably responsible for getting me into epic fantasy (not kidding), the franchise that I have publicly credited with teaching me how to plot long-term.  A franchise that was, at least originally, aimed exclusively at little girls who enjoyed ponies and hair-play.  I think that all fandoms should be for everyone, and I love that My Little Pony has finally found a male audience, but are you kidding here?  Are you seriously telling me that the second men discover something I have loved since I was four years old, I suddenly have to pass trivia exams to keep considering myself a fan?  Because if that’s the way things are going, I want to hear the Sea Pony song right fucking now.

Ahem.

Most of the female fans I know have expressed concern about this credential checking, in part because who the fuck wants to have to take a quiz when you’re standing in line waiting to get Chris Claremont’s autograph?  I mean, really.  And there’s always the possibility that you’ll fail the exam, and a) many of us have deep-seated test anxiety, courtesy of the American school system, and b) no one likes being bullied.  Telling me I’m not a real geek because I can’t name the members of the Justice League (spoiler: I can’t, I don’t read DC) is bullying.  It’s offensive and it’s upsetting and it leaves me feeling like a faker, even when I’m not.  Even when I’m demonstratively not.

And this “you’re a fake, you have no right to be here” routine is almost universally directed at women.  I see these women in these incredible costumes that took hours to make and will cause chafing and shin splits and lots of other discomforts, and then I see them getting mocked for being “fake” by men in jeans and hero logo T-shirts.  Captain America probably doesn’t like you making fun of women, good sir.  Just saying.

Then, this year, I saw something wonderful.  I was crossing the floor with Amy when we encountered a tall blonde dressed as Emma Frost.  I will always stop and admire a good Emma—it’s in my genes—so we paused to study her costume and tell her how amazing she looked.  She saw the name on my badge and lit up.

"I was hoping to run into you!" she said.  “I remembered that you love Emma!"

One of my fans dressed as Emma Frost and she did it <i>for me</i>.

I have never felt so much like a rock star.

We stayed and chatted with her—because let’s face it, you dress up as Emma Frost to make me happy, you have damn well earned some chatting with—and she confessed that she had been cred checked not long before.  “I said Emma was both the White Queen and the Black Queen,” she said.  “Was that right?”  I started explaining the Dark X-Men.  While we were doing that, a man with a camera came up and started taking her picture without asking permission.  She stopped talking to us, turned her body slightly away from him, held up her hand, and said, “You can’t take my picture unless you can tell me who I am.”

She was dressed as a very iconic Emma: all in white, with the half-cape connected to a semi-corset top, white boots, and a white “X” logo on her belt.  She had small snowflakes on her collarbones, representing Emma’s transformation.  She had the white choker.  She had the blue lipstick.  Basically, if you have any familiarity with Marvel, you would recognize her, and since that version of Emma has been on literally hundreds of comic book covers in the past five years, even most DC readers should have recognized her.

"Storm?" guessed the man.

All three of us laughed, but uncomfortably, like we were discovering a terrible secret.  And while Amy and I stood there, this happened four more times: the unsolicited pictures, the refusal, the incorrect guess.  Only three of the men actually stopped taking pictures when told to.

As women, we are afraid of being unmasked as somehow “not geeky enough.”  Meanwhile, these men, who were clearly just trying to take pictures of a scantily clad woman, not pictures of an awesome costume, can’t identify one of the most iconic figures from one of the largest publishers.

I’ve been saying for a while that the “fake geek girl” thing was a form of harassment: a way of making sure that women in fandom don’t “forget their place.”  But this, more than anything, drove home to me just how big of a double standard it is.  As women, we’re expected to know enough to “earn our spot,” but not so much that we seem like know-it-alls; we’re supposed to add attractive eye candy to the proceedings, but shouldn’t expect men to stop taking our pictures when asked; we’re supposed to worry about not seeming geeky enough, while never worrying whether the men around us could pass those same tests.  The mere fact of their maleness is sufficient.

There was something beautiful about seeing the fake geek girl check flipped back in the other direction, but there was also something profoundly sad about it, because it illustrated just how deep this divide is growing.  We’re all geeks.  We need to have respect for each other, in all ways—no taking pictures without asking, no shouting “Emma!” at a cosplayer and then saying “See? I told you she knew who she was dressed as” when she turns around.  Just no.

It needs to stop.

(And if you were that Emma, drop me a line, hey?  I never did get your name, and you were awesome.)

Reblogged from theproclone  521 notes
    • Michelle :

      I was doing this weird video about dogs that attack people. I was in South Africa shooting when the director said to get in the front seat and drive while the guys jump in and you drive everyone off. One of the actor’s was like “the girl’s not gonna drive the car.” That was the most sexist thing that was said to my face.

    • Katee :

      I had called out a guy in a scene a couple weeks before, which he didn’t like. We had a fight scene and he pulled my arms out of the sockets and had tears along my spine, and was in pain to the point of crying. I said “can you take it easier on me?” and he said “I’ve seen your work and figured you could take it.” I called my friend who is a real fighter and he really wanted to come in and back me up. I had to talk him out of it. There are those moments where people think you are incredibly tough or go the opposite and figure there’s no way you could do it.

    • Michelle :

      You’ve got some serious class to be able to handle that and not flip out. I would have flipped out!

    • Tatiana :

      I’ve been told not to think too much by a director. I had ideas and wanted to bounce them off him, and he said “yeah yeah yeah, she’s smiling, she’s sweet.” You would never say that to a male actor, it was so condescending. And another thing is just how I’m treated by crew on set since I looked so young. In a scene I was tied to a bed and a crew member was hitting on me while tied down. It was completely inappropriate.

    • Danai :

      there’s a really difficult space that women have to occupy: do you call it out or how do you handle it? Like, it just happened but how do you state that happened and define it. When they don’t really include you, is another issue. We have these men who are making the decisions, and it’s how you inject yourself in the creative process. Sometimes you have get in there without being the annoying chick or where they say “oh she’s crazy.” I was on a film where the guy could get loose and wouldn’t get called out where I wouldn’t have that luxury, if I did anything I wasn’t allowed that leeway. As women, we always have to see it through. We can’t just let it go or else the next girl will have to deal with it too.

    • Michelle :

      I got a solution! Women should just create their own companies and productions and then the men will have to fight to attract the ladies. We just need to stop working with directors who perpetuate these stories that don’t have strong female characters. These are disseminated throughout the world and transcend into other cultures.

    • Danai :

      America’s image and culture is America’s biggest export. I grew up in Zimbabwe and watched Girl Fight, and loved it.

    • Katee :

      this business and our world in particular is hard on women. I’m the same size now that I was when I was 17. I was told I was fat and couldn’t get work, but thankfully I was headstrong thanks to my parents and pushed on.

Reblogged from anndie1326  16,085 notes
anndie1326:

racebending:

For the first time ever, this year’s Women Who Kick Ass panel at ComicCon was held in the convention’s largest venue, Hall H.  Entertainment Weekly covers the panel here and it sounds incredible.   A full transcript of the panel is here.
Unfortunately, the audience’s response to this panel was sexist and predictable.

A panel called “Women Who Kick Ass” follows Hunger Games. It’s in its fourth iteration, and the fact that it’s in Hall H on Saturday is a surprise. On the surface, it makes sense for this to follow Hunger Games, and it’s also likely the Con intended it to be something that would allow for the room to clear out a bit while shuffling in more people from the line that still snakes off across the street outside. But, all the same, there’s something gutsy about placing a frank discussion of Hollywood sexism, feminism, and the limited opportunities for women in the entertainment industry right before 20th Century Fox and Marvel come out to present superhero-heavy slates.
And “Women Who Kick Ass&#8221; is the most fascinating and enriching panel I attend at Comic-Con. In particular, its discussion of how sexism still rules far too often in Hollywood is terrific, with panelist Katee Sackhoff (of Battlestar Galactica fame) discussing a time an unnamed male actor pulled her arms out of their sockets while filming a fight sequence, in what she believes was recourse for her questioning him earlier in the shoot; and fellow panelist Tatiana Maslany of Orphan Black discussing how a male crew member inappropriately hit on her when she was just 18 and bound to a bed for a shot. The moderator is good, in that she knows to get out of the way when the women on the panel — particularly Michelle Rodriguez — cut loose, and the content is engaging throughout.
For the most part, the dudes I’m sitting near either pay respectful attention or check Twitter, though there are some jokes from an older guy in front of me about how stupid he finds all of this. Then Rodriguez uses the phrase “destructive male culture” — as part of a larger answer about how women need to take more agency in telling their own stories — and something in the crowd flips. A certain subset of the audience begins to get more and more vocal, and when the panel runs slightly over, as all panels have done during the day, the vocalizations begin to get easier to hear, even to someone sitting clear across a giant room in a place that tends to eat sound from specific individuals in the audience; one really has to make a ruckus to be heard.
The final question — from a young woman about what aspects the perfect kick-ass woman would have — turns into a digression about the many roles that women play in real life and the few that they are asked to play onscreen. It’s all fascinating stuff, with Sackhoff talking about wanting to see someone as kind and strong as her mother onscreen, and Walking Dead’s Danai Gurira talking about the effectiveness of female political protestors in her native Zimbabwe, the sort of story that would almost never appear in a Hollywood film — but the longer it goes on, the more restless the crowd gets. When Rodriguez grabs the microphone again to follow up on a point made by another panelist, for the first time, the audience ripples with something close to jeering anger. When the panel finally ends and the five women on it proceed off to the side for photographs, something done at the end of most Hall H panels, someone shouts something from the audience, to a mixture of supportive laughs and horrified gasps, and the women quickly leave the stage. (I was not sitting close enough to hear what was said, but I confirmed with several people sitting in the immediate vicinity that it was a young man shouting “Women who talk too much!” after the loudspeaker asked attendees to voice their appreciation for the participants in the “Women Who Kick Ass” panel.)
It’s an ugly moment, an unfortunate capper to a great session, to be followed by many of the guys sitting around me offering up tired lines like “I hope they feel empowered now!” and several recitations of the Twilight mantra about ruining the Con. To be sure, most people in the room were respectful. But at a certain point, there needs to be an accounting for the fact that there is an ugliness that burbles beneath the surface of too many Comic-Con events, sometimes intentional and sometimes unintentional. That’s not a task for the Con itself. It’s a task for nerd culture, and one that will require an earnest attempt to understand why this sort of ugliness rises up so often around women, lest all the nerd culture stereotypes prove unfortunately true.
-Todd VanDerWerff “A Day Inside ComicCon’s Hall H&#8221;


I was in Hall H for this panel and did not get the same audience vibe that the OP did. There was some definite indifference in our area (even from us) but not outright rudeness. I do think the panel subject or perhaps the panelists weren’t right for that room (would have done much better in Ballroom 20). The panel may have been more successful with the audience if it had included women who were being featured that day or in the genre of the day (Halle Berry, Jennifer Lawrence, Scarlett Johannson, etc) and I know that would have been difficult with the “secrecy&#8221; of who was still to come. I think the ladies did a great job (moderator may have also contributed some to the tone of the panel) but they were in a room where the audience was there for Fox and Marvel and not for a group of highly successful TV actors (primarily). 

Regarding the panelists and their experience: Michelle Rodriguez is a star in one of the world&#8217;s largest film franchises and Maggie Q is an international superstar who is so famous, when you go to Nikita panels at SDCC 90% of the audience Q&amp;A is people asking her questions about her film career.  Both Katee Sackhoff and Danai Gurira were on other Hall H panels that weekend for their big franchises (Sackhoff&#8217;s new movie and Gurira&#8217;s show, the most watched cable show ever), and Tatiana Maslany&#8217;s breakout show was the belle of the convention.  
I do think that any panel featuring a broad range of women performers&#8212; particularly one as diverse as this one&#8212;would necessitate the inclusion of TV actors (in this case, 2 out of 5) simply because the film industry does not provide many genre roles for women, particularly women of color.   In any case, during the same weekend there was a panel of actors, all men, and all TV show stars only, in the same venue.
But I want to address this primarily because I&#8217;ve seen some other reblogs of this post saying the same thing.  

I think this is super cool. But i feel like theyre at the wrong place. Most men who go to comic con arent exactly female friendly people really. Odd seeing as most the women who go are open minded thinkers. (source)
I was here and honestly, a lot of people around me were napping including myself. I tried to pay attention as long as I could but going over 2 days without sleep, it hit me and plenty of others. It sucks that they got a negative reaction but the room that they were put in was too big and not the right audience. (source)

It&#8217;s this whole &#8220;This is awesome but not right for that room&#8221; mentality.  It&#8217;s probably an unconscious reflex because when something as disturbing as what happened to these panelists happens, we try and rationalize what happened, and all too often we follow our instincts in a society where we are conditioned to blame women for the sexist crap that happens to them.
In this case, it&#8217;s the idea that the women were in the wrong place, and while it&#8217;s too bad that did happen to them, if they had been in a different room and not the biggest, most important, main headlining showroom at San Diego ComicCon this wouldn&#8217;t have happened.
This response is likely instinctual, but it still (intentionally or unintentionally) communicates these troubling and sexist messages:
A panel about women isn&#8217;t meant to be in Hall H&#8230;.even though a similar panel of guy actors was held in Hall H that weekend, too.
ComicCon and the panel organizers erred by placing the women in this room.   They should have understood that ComicCon attendees are not there for women (but for male-dominated franchises such as WB&#8217;s DC Comics or Disney&#8217;s Marvel Studios.)
Men who are interested in the Hall H programming are the &#8220;wrong audience&#8221; for a panel of all women.   We can&#8217;t expect men to be interested in women&#8217;s issues, by jove!
When you put a panel of experienced and talented women performers in front of the wrong audience, some men won&#8217;t be able to help themselves and will say rude things, so the best thing to do is for an all-women panel is to not show up at the wrong place at the wrong time.   Too bad they didn&#8217;t know to not appear in the most important venue at the convention.
It&#8217;s a form of victim-blaming.  It places the responsibility on the women who were on the panel, the women who organized the panel, and ComicCon programming to find a less important space&#8212;rather than on the minority (but still significant enough to be harmful) of men in Hall H and their choices to be openly rude, disrespectful, and misogynistic.  
Nobody is forced  to attend Hall H programming.  If at any point Hall H programming becomes uninteresting to you, you have a multitude of options.  You could do some soul searching and wonder why it&#8217;s coincidentally the all-women panel you&#8217;ve decided to check out on.  You have the ComicCon catalog to read or your phone, or you can nap like the person above did.   If at any point you can&#8217;t handle a discussion about sexism or diversity, you also have the option to leave.   Hall H offers 45 minute long bathroom passes for you to go take a man poop and get more nachos.
Those men made a conscious choice to stay in the room, a choice to be sexist and loudly declare things like &#8220;we need a man-power panel&#8221; and "she should shut up and take her clothes off" while the panelists talked about their experiences being patronized, sexually harassed, and physically maimed by systemic sexism and sexist men in their workplaces.
Hall H was exactly where this panel of genre actresses deserved to be.
It wasn&#8217;t the wrong room.   It wasn&#8217;t the wrong audience.   The audience was wrong.  Not the women panelists and not the organizers.  

anndie1326:

racebending:

For the first time ever, this year’s Women Who Kick Ass panel at ComicCon was held in the convention’s largest venue, Hall H.  Entertainment Weekly covers the panel here and it sounds incredible.   A full transcript of the panel is here.

Unfortunately, the audience’s response to this panel was sexist and predictable.

A panel called “Women Who Kick Ass” follows Hunger Games. It’s in its fourth iteration, and the fact that it’s in Hall H on Saturday is a surprise. On the surface, it makes sense for this to follow Hunger Games, and it’s also likely the Con intended it to be something that would allow for the room to clear out a bit while shuffling in more people from the line that still snakes off across the street outside. But, all the same, there’s something gutsy about placing a frank discussion of Hollywood sexism, feminism, and the limited opportunities for women in the entertainment industry right before 20th Century Fox and Marvel come out to present superhero-heavy slates.

And “Women Who Kick Ass” is the most fascinating and enriching panel I attend at Comic-Con. In particular, its discussion of how sexism still rules far too often in Hollywood is terrific, with panelist Katee Sackhoff (of Battlestar Galactica fame) discussing a time an unnamed male actor pulled her arms out of their sockets while filming a fight sequence, in what she believes was recourse for her questioning him earlier in the shoot; and fellow panelist Tatiana Maslany of Orphan Black discussing how a male crew member inappropriately hit on her when she was just 18 and bound to a bed for a shot. The moderator is good, in that she knows to get out of the way when the women on the panel — particularly Michelle Rodriguez — cut loose, and the content is engaging throughout.

For the most part, the dudes I’m sitting near either pay respectful attention or check Twitter, though there are some jokes from an older guy in front of me about how stupid he finds all of this. Then Rodriguez uses the phrase “destructive male culture” — as part of a larger answer about how women need to take more agency in telling their own stories — and something in the crowd flips. A certain subset of the audience begins to get more and more vocal, and when the panel runs slightly over, as all panels have done during the day, the vocalizations begin to get easier to hear, even to someone sitting clear across a giant room in a place that tends to eat sound from specific individuals in the audience; one really has to make a ruckus to be heard.

The final question — from a young woman about what aspects the perfect kick-ass woman would have — turns into a digression about the many roles that women play in real life and the few that they are asked to play onscreen. It’s all fascinating stuff, with Sackhoff talking about wanting to see someone as kind and strong as her mother onscreen, and Walking Dead’s Danai Gurira talking about the effectiveness of female political protestors in her native Zimbabwe, the sort of story that would almost never appear in a Hollywood film — but the longer it goes on, the more restless the crowd gets. When Rodriguez grabs the microphone again to follow up on a point made by another panelist, for the first time, the audience ripples with something close to jeering anger. When the panel finally ends and the five women on it proceed off to the side for photographs, something done at the end of most Hall H panels, someone shouts something from the audience, to a mixture of supportive laughs and horrified gasps, and the women quickly leave the stage. (I was not sitting close enough to hear what was said, but I confirmed with several people sitting in the immediate vicinity that it was a young man shouting “Women who talk too much!” after the loudspeaker asked attendees to voice their appreciation for the participants in the “Women Who Kick Ass” panel.)

It’s an ugly moment, an unfortunate capper to a great session, to be followed by many of the guys sitting around me offering up tired lines like “I hope they feel empowered now!” and several recitations of the Twilight mantra about ruining the Con. To be sure, most people in the room were respectful. But at a certain point, there needs to be an accounting for the fact that there is an ugliness that burbles beneath the surface of too many Comic-Con events, sometimes intentional and sometimes unintentional. That’s not a task for the Con itself. It’s a task for nerd culture, and one that will require an earnest attempt to understand why this sort of ugliness rises up so often around women, lest all the nerd culture stereotypes prove unfortunately true.

-Todd VanDerWerff “A Day Inside ComicCon’s Hall H”

I was in Hall H for this panel and did not get the same audience vibe that the OP did. There was some definite indifference in our area (even from us) but not outright rudeness. I do think the panel subject or perhaps the panelists weren’t right for that room (would have done much better in Ballroom 20). The panel may have been more successful with the audience if it had included women who were being featured that day or in the genre of the day (Halle Berry, Jennifer Lawrence, Scarlett Johannson, etc) and I know that would have been difficult with the “secrecy” of who was still to come. I think the ladies did a great job (moderator may have also contributed some to the tone of the panel) but they were in a room where the audience was there for Fox and Marvel and not for a group of highly successful TV actors (primarily). 

Regarding the panelists and their experience: Michelle Rodriguez is a star in one of the world’s largest film franchises and Maggie Q is an international superstar who is so famous, when you go to Nikita panels at SDCC 90% of the audience Q&A is people asking her questions about her film career.  Both Katee Sackhoff and Danai Gurira were on other Hall H panels that weekend for their big franchises (Sackhoff’s new movie and Gurira’s show, the most watched cable show ever), and Tatiana Maslany’s breakout show was the belle of the convention.  

I do think that any panel featuring a broad range of women performers— particularly one as diverse as this one—would necessitate the inclusion of TV actors (in this case, 2 out of 5) simply because the film industry does not provide many genre roles for women, particularly women of color.   In any case, during the same weekend there was a panel of actors, all men, and all TV show stars only, in the same venue.

But I want to address this primarily because I’ve seen some other reblogs of this post saying the same thing.  

I think this is super cool. But i feel like theyre at the wrong place. Most men who go to comic con arent exactly female friendly people really. Odd seeing as most the women who go are open minded thinkers. (source)

I was here and honestly, a lot of people around me were napping including myself. I tried to pay attention as long as I could but going over 2 days without sleep, it hit me and plenty of others. It sucks that they got a negative reaction but the room that they were put in was too big and not the right audience. (source)

It’s this whole “This is awesome but not right for that room” mentality.  It’s probably an unconscious reflex because when something as disturbing as what happened to these panelists happens, we try and rationalize what happened, and all too often we follow our instincts in a society where we are conditioned to blame women for the sexist crap that happens to them.

In this case, it’s the idea that the women were in the wrong place, and while it’s too bad that did happen to them, if they had been in a different room and not the biggest, most important, main headlining showroom at San Diego ComicCon this wouldn’t have happened.

This response is likely instinctual, but it still (intentionally or unintentionally) communicates these troubling and sexist messages:

  • A panel about women isn’t meant to be in Hall H….even though a similar panel of guy actors was held in Hall H that weekend, too.
  • ComicCon and the panel organizers erred by placing the women in this room.   They should have understood that ComicCon attendees are not there for women (but for male-dominated franchises such as WB’s DC Comics or Disney’s Marvel Studios.)
  • Men who are interested in the Hall H programming are the “wrong audience” for a panel of all women.   We can’t expect men to be interested in women’s issues, by jove!
  • When you put a panel of experienced and talented women performers in front of the wrong audience, some men won’t be able to help themselves and will say rude things, so the best thing to do is for an all-women panel is to not show up at the wrong place at the wrong time.   Too bad they didn’t know to not appear in the most important venue at the convention.

It’s a form of victim-blaming.  It places the responsibility on the women who were on the panel, the women who organized the panel, and ComicCon programming to find a less important space—rather than on the minority (but still significant enough to be harmful) of men in Hall H and their choices to be openly rude, disrespectful, and misogynistic.  

Nobody is forced to attend Hall H programming.  If at any point Hall H programming becomes uninteresting to you, you have a multitude of options.  You could do some soul searching and wonder why it’s coincidentally the all-women panel you’ve decided to check out on.  You have the ComicCon catalog to read or your phone, or you can nap like the person above did.   If at any point you can’t handle a discussion about sexism or diversity, you also have the option to leave.   Hall H offers 45 minute long bathroom passes for you to go take a man poop and get more nachos.

Those men made a conscious choice to stay in the room, a choice to be sexist and loudly declare things like “we need a man-power panel” and "she should shut up and take her clothes off" while the panelists talked about their experiences being patronized, sexually harassed, and physically maimed by systemic sexism and sexist men in their workplaces.

Hall H was exactly where this panel of genre actresses deserved to be.

It wasn’t the wrong room.   It wasn’t the wrong audience.   The audience was wrong.  Not the women panelists and not the organizers.  

Reblogged from pepper-lasredes  16,085 notes
pepper-lasredes:

quantumstarlight:

racebending:

For the first time ever, this year’s Women Who Kick Ass panel at ComicCon was held in the convention’s largest venue, Hall H.  Entertainment Weekly covers the panel here and it sounds incredible.
Unfortunately, the audience’s response to this panel was sexist and predictable.

A panel called “Women Who Kick Ass” follows Hunger Games. It’s in its fourth iteration, and the fact that it’s in Hall H on Saturday is a surprise. On the surface, it makes sense for this to follow Hunger Games, and it’s also likely the Con intended it to be something that would allow for the room to clear out a bit while shuffling in more people from the line that still snakes off across the street outside. But, all the same, there’s something gutsy about placing a frank discussion of Hollywood sexism, feminism, and the limited opportunities for women in the entertainment industry right before 20th Century Fox and Marvel come out to present superhero-heavy slates.
And “Women Who Kick Ass&#8221; is the most fascinating and enriching panel I attend at Comic-Con. In particular, its discussion of how sexism still rules far too often in Hollywood is terrific, with panelist Katee Sackhoff (of Battlestar Galactica fame) discussing a time an unnamed male actor pulled her arms out of their sockets while filming a fight sequence, in what she believes was recourse for her questioning him earlier in the shoot; and fellow panelist Tatiana Maslany of Orphan Black discussing how a male crew member inappropriately hit on her when she was just 18 and bound to a bed for a shot. The moderator is good, in that she knows to get out of the way when the women on the panel — particularly Michelle Rodriguez — cut loose, and the content is engaging throughout.
For the most part, the dudes I’m sitting near either pay respectful attention or check Twitter, though there are some jokes from an older guy in front of me about how stupid he finds all of this. Then Rodriguez uses the phrase “destructive male culture” — as part of a larger answer about how women need to take more agency in telling their own stories — and something in the crowd flips. A certain subset of the audience begins to get more and more vocal, and when the panel runs slightly over, as all panels have done during the day, the vocalizations begin to get easier to hear, even to someone sitting clear across a giant room in a place that tends to eat sound from specific individuals in the audience; one really has to make a ruckus to be heard.
The final question — from a young woman about what aspects the perfect kick-ass woman would have — turns into a digression about the many roles that women play in real life and the few that they are asked to play onscreen. It’s all fascinating stuff, with Sackhoff talking about wanting to see someone as kind and strong as her mother onscreen, and Walking Dead’s Danai Gurira talking about the effectiveness of female political protestors in her native Zimbabwe, the sort of story that would almost never appear in a Hollywood film — but the longer it goes on, the more restless the crowd gets. When Rodriguez grabs the microphone again to follow up on a point made by another panelist, for the first time, the audience ripples with something close to jeering anger. When the panel finally ends and the five women on it proceed off to the side for photographs, something done at the end of most Hall H panels, someone shouts something from the audience, to a mixture of supportive laughs and horrified gasps, and the women quickly leave the stage. (I was not sitting close enough to hear what was said, but I confirmed with several people sitting in the immediate vicinity that it was a young man shouting “Women who talk too much!” after the loudspeaker asked attendees to voice their appreciation for the participants in the “Women Who Kick Ass” panel.)
It’s an ugly moment, an unfortunate capper to a great session, to be followed by many of the guys sitting around me offering up tired lines like “I hope they feel empowered now!” and several recitations of the Twilight mantra about ruining the Con. To be sure, most people in the room were respectful. But at a certain point, there needs to be an accounting for the fact that there is an ugliness that burbles beneath the surface of too many Comic-Con events, sometimes intentional and sometimes unintentional. That’s not a task for the Con itself. It’s a task for nerd culture, and one that will require an earnest attempt to understand why this sort of ugliness rises up so often around women, lest all the nerd culture stereotypes prove unfortunately true.
-Todd VanDerWerff “A Day Inside ComicCon’s Hall H&#8221;


This is particularly disturbing when you think about the main reason most dudes like this would GO to a panel called Women Who Kick Ass, especially given that they probably had to wait for hours to get in: they think female characters “kicking ass&#8221; is intended for their male enjoyment and objectification.
The other reason they’d be there is because they’re waiting for another panel that follows it — which is exactly why SDCC should clear their rooms between each panel. That IS a task for the con itself. 

The truth is that many of the women presented as ‘kick ass’ tend to be presented in a way that encourages objectification. It is sad how much sexuality is on display when a woman kicks ass on screen. There is a rising trend that is shifting this problematic portrayal, but this change is gradual and until it becomes more prominant, we are going to continue having panels where women speaking of important undercurrents in the Hollywood machine are demeaned by the audience of males that are encouraged to ojectify them.  

pepper-lasredes:

quantumstarlight:

racebending:

For the first time ever, this year’s Women Who Kick Ass panel at ComicCon was held in the convention’s largest venue, Hall H.  Entertainment Weekly covers the panel here and it sounds incredible.

Unfortunately, the audience’s response to this panel was sexist and predictable.

A panel called “Women Who Kick Ass” follows Hunger Games. It’s in its fourth iteration, and the fact that it’s in Hall H on Saturday is a surprise. On the surface, it makes sense for this to follow Hunger Games, and it’s also likely the Con intended it to be something that would allow for the room to clear out a bit while shuffling in more people from the line that still snakes off across the street outside. But, all the same, there’s something gutsy about placing a frank discussion of Hollywood sexism, feminism, and the limited opportunities for women in the entertainment industry right before 20th Century Fox and Marvel come out to present superhero-heavy slates.

And “Women Who Kick Ass” is the most fascinating and enriching panel I attend at Comic-Con. In particular, its discussion of how sexism still rules far too often in Hollywood is terrific, with panelist Katee Sackhoff (of Battlestar Galactica fame) discussing a time an unnamed male actor pulled her arms out of their sockets while filming a fight sequence, in what she believes was recourse for her questioning him earlier in the shoot; and fellow panelist Tatiana Maslany of Orphan Black discussing how a male crew member inappropriately hit on her when she was just 18 and bound to a bed for a shot. The moderator is good, in that she knows to get out of the way when the women on the panel — particularly Michelle Rodriguez — cut loose, and the content is engaging throughout.

For the most part, the dudes I’m sitting near either pay respectful attention or check Twitter, though there are some jokes from an older guy in front of me about how stupid he finds all of this. Then Rodriguez uses the phrase “destructive male culture” — as part of a larger answer about how women need to take more agency in telling their own stories — and something in the crowd flips. A certain subset of the audience begins to get more and more vocal, and when the panel runs slightly over, as all panels have done during the day, the vocalizations begin to get easier to hear, even to someone sitting clear across a giant room in a place that tends to eat sound from specific individuals in the audience; one really has to make a ruckus to be heard.

The final question — from a young woman about what aspects the perfect kick-ass woman would have — turns into a digression about the many roles that women play in real life and the few that they are asked to play onscreen. It’s all fascinating stuff, with Sackhoff talking about wanting to see someone as kind and strong as her mother onscreen, and Walking Dead’s Danai Gurira talking about the effectiveness of female political protestors in her native Zimbabwe, the sort of story that would almost never appear in a Hollywood film — but the longer it goes on, the more restless the crowd gets. When Rodriguez grabs the microphone again to follow up on a point made by another panelist, for the first time, the audience ripples with something close to jeering anger. When the panel finally ends and the five women on it proceed off to the side for photographs, something done at the end of most Hall H panels, someone shouts something from the audience, to a mixture of supportive laughs and horrified gasps, and the women quickly leave the stage. (I was not sitting close enough to hear what was said, but I confirmed with several people sitting in the immediate vicinity that it was a young man shouting “Women who talk too much!” after the loudspeaker asked attendees to voice their appreciation for the participants in the “Women Who Kick Ass” panel.)

It’s an ugly moment, an unfortunate capper to a great session, to be followed by many of the guys sitting around me offering up tired lines like “I hope they feel empowered now!” and several recitations of the Twilight mantra about ruining the Con. To be sure, most people in the room were respectful. But at a certain point, there needs to be an accounting for the fact that there is an ugliness that burbles beneath the surface of too many Comic-Con events, sometimes intentional and sometimes unintentional. That’s not a task for the Con itself. It’s a task for nerd culture, and one that will require an earnest attempt to understand why this sort of ugliness rises up so often around women, lest all the nerd culture stereotypes prove unfortunately true.

-Todd VanDerWerff “A Day Inside ComicCon’s Hall H”

This is particularly disturbing when you think about the main reason most dudes like this would GO to a panel called Women Who Kick Ass, especially given that they probably had to wait for hours to get in: they think female characters “kicking ass” is intended for their male enjoyment and objectification.

The other reason they’d be there is because they’re waiting for another panel that follows it — which is exactly why SDCC should clear their rooms between each panel. That IS a task for the con itself. 

The truth is that many of the women presented as ‘kick ass’ tend to be presented in a way that encourages objectification. It is sad how much sexuality is on display when a woman kicks ass on screen. There is a rising trend that is shifting this problematic portrayal, but this change is gradual and until it becomes more prominant, we are going to continue having panels where women speaking of important undercurrents in the Hollywood machine are demeaned by the audience of males that are encouraged to ojectify them.  

For the first time ever, this year&#8217;s Women Who Kick Ass panel at ComicCon was held in the convention&#8217;s largest venue, Hall H.  Entertainment Weekly covers the panel here and it sounds incredible.   A full transcript of the panel is here.
Unfortunately, the audience&#8217;s response to this panel was sexist and predictable.

A panel called “Women Who Kick Ass” follows Hunger Games. It’s in its fourth iteration, and the fact that it’s in Hall H on Saturday is a surprise. On the surface, it makes sense for this to follow Hunger Games, and it’s also likely the Con intended it to be something that would allow for the room to clear out a bit while shuffling in more people from the line that still snakes off across the street outside. But, all the same, there’s something gutsy about placing a frank discussion of Hollywood sexism, feminism, and the limited opportunities for women in the entertainment industry right before 20th Century Fox and Marvel come out to present superhero-heavy slates.

And &#8220;Women Who Kick Ass&#8221; is the most fascinating and enriching panel I attend at Comic-Con. In particular, its discussion of how sexism still rules far too often in Hollywood is terrific, with panelist Katee Sackhoff (of Battlestar Galactica fame) discussing a time an unnamed male actor pulled her arms out of their sockets while filming a fight sequence, in what she believes was recourse for her questioning him earlier in the shoot; and fellow panelist Tatiana Maslany of Orphan Black discussing how a male crew member inappropriately hit on her when she was just 18 and bound to a bed for a shot. The moderator is good, in that she knows to get out of the way when the women on the panel — particularly Michelle Rodriguez — cut loose, and the content is engaging throughout.
For the most part, the dudes I’m sitting near either pay respectful attention or check Twitter, though there are some jokes from an older guy in front of me about how stupid he finds all of this. Then Rodriguez uses the phrase “destructive male culture” — as part of a larger answer about how women need to take more agency in telling their own stories — and something in the crowd flips. A certain subset of the audience begins to get more and more vocal, and when the panel runs slightly over, as all panels have done during the day, the vocalizations begin to get easier to hear, even to someone sitting clear across a giant room in a place that tends to eat sound from specific individuals in the audience; one really has to make a ruckus to be heard.
The final question — from a young woman about what aspects the perfect kick-ass woman would have — turns into a digression about the many roles that women play in real life and the few that they are asked to play onscreen. It’s all fascinating stuff, with Sackhoff talking about wanting to see someone as kind and strong as her mother onscreen, and Walking Dead’s Danai Gurira talking about the effectiveness of female political protestors in her native Zimbabwe, the sort of story that would almost never appear in a Hollywood film — but the longer it goes on, the more restless the crowd gets. When Rodriguez grabs the microphone again to follow up on a point made by another panelist, for the first time, the audience ripples with something close to jeering anger. When the panel finally ends and the five women on it proceed off to the side for photographs, something done at the end of most Hall H panels, someone shouts something from the audience, to a mixture of supportive laughs and horrified gasps, and the women quickly leave the stage. (I was not sitting close enough to hear what was said, but I confirmed with several people sitting in the immediate vicinity that it was a young man shouting “Women who talk too much!” after the loudspeaker asked attendees to voice their appreciation for the participants in the “Women Who Kick Ass” panel.)
It’s an ugly moment, an unfortunate capper to a great session, to be followed by many of the guys sitting around me offering up tired lines like “I hope they feel empowered now!” and several recitations of the Twilight mantra about ruining the Con. To be sure, most people in the room were respectful. But at a certain point, there needs to be an accounting for the fact that there is an ugliness that burbles beneath the surface of too many Comic-Con events, sometimes intentional and sometimes unintentional. That’s not a task for the Con itself. It’s a task for nerd culture, and one that will require an earnest attempt to understand why this sort of ugliness rises up so often around women, lest all the nerd culture stereotypes prove unfortunately true.
-Todd VanDerWerff &#8220;A Day Inside ComicCon&#8217;s Hall H&#8221;

For the first time ever, this year’s Women Who Kick Ass panel at ComicCon was held in the convention’s largest venue, Hall H.  Entertainment Weekly covers the panel here and it sounds incredible.   A full transcript of the panel is here.

Unfortunately, the audience’s response to this panel was sexist and predictable.

A panel called “Women Who Kick Ass” follows Hunger Games. It’s in its fourth iteration, and the fact that it’s in Hall H on Saturday is a surprise. On the surface, it makes sense for this to follow Hunger Games, and it’s also likely the Con intended it to be something that would allow for the room to clear out a bit while shuffling in more people from the line that still snakes off across the street outside. But, all the same, there’s something gutsy about placing a frank discussion of Hollywood sexism, feminism, and the limited opportunities for women in the entertainment industry right before 20th Century Fox and Marvel come out to present superhero-heavy slates.

And “Women Who Kick Ass” is the most fascinating and enriching panel I attend at Comic-Con. In particular, its discussion of how sexism still rules far too often in Hollywood is terrific, with panelist Katee Sackhoff (of Battlestar Galactica fame) discussing a time an unnamed male actor pulled her arms out of their sockets while filming a fight sequence, in what she believes was recourse for her questioning him earlier in the shoot; and fellow panelist Tatiana Maslany of Orphan Black discussing how a male crew member inappropriately hit on her when she was just 18 and bound to a bed for a shot. The moderator is good, in that she knows to get out of the way when the women on the panel — particularly Michelle Rodriguez — cut loose, and the content is engaging throughout.

For the most part, the dudes I’m sitting near either pay respectful attention or check Twitter, though there are some jokes from an older guy in front of me about how stupid he finds all of this. Then Rodriguez uses the phrase “destructive male culture” — as part of a larger answer about how women need to take more agency in telling their own stories — and something in the crowd flips. A certain subset of the audience begins to get more and more vocal, and when the panel runs slightly over, as all panels have done during the day, the vocalizations begin to get easier to hear, even to someone sitting clear across a giant room in a place that tends to eat sound from specific individuals in the audience; one really has to make a ruckus to be heard.

The final question — from a young woman about what aspects the perfect kick-ass woman would have — turns into a digression about the many roles that women play in real life and the few that they are asked to play onscreen. It’s all fascinating stuff, with Sackhoff talking about wanting to see someone as kind and strong as her mother onscreen, and Walking Dead’s Danai Gurira talking about the effectiveness of female political protestors in her native Zimbabwe, the sort of story that would almost never appear in a Hollywood film — but the longer it goes on, the more restless the crowd gets. When Rodriguez grabs the microphone again to follow up on a point made by another panelist, for the first time, the audience ripples with something close to jeering anger. When the panel finally ends and the five women on it proceed off to the side for photographs, something done at the end of most Hall H panels, someone shouts something from the audience, to a mixture of supportive laughs and horrified gasps, and the women quickly leave the stage. (I was not sitting close enough to hear what was said, but I confirmed with several people sitting in the immediate vicinity that it was a young man shouting “Women who talk too much!” after the loudspeaker asked attendees to voice their appreciation for the participants in the “Women Who Kick Ass” panel.)

It’s an ugly moment, an unfortunate capper to a great session, to be followed by many of the guys sitting around me offering up tired lines like “I hope they feel empowered now!” and several recitations of the Twilight mantra about ruining the Con. To be sure, most people in the room were respectful. But at a certain point, there needs to be an accounting for the fact that there is an ugliness that burbles beneath the surface of too many Comic-Con events, sometimes intentional and sometimes unintentional. That’s not a task for the Con itself. It’s a task for nerd culture, and one that will require an earnest attempt to understand why this sort of ugliness rises up so often around women, lest all the nerd culture stereotypes prove unfortunately true.

-Todd VanDerWerff “A Day Inside ComicCon’s Hall H”

Racebending.com will be holding our third San Diego ComicCon panel on Sunday, July 21st at 1:30pm in Room 23ABC!   

Shattering Convention in Comic Book Storytelling
Moderated by Racebending.com, this panel of comic book authors discuss their experiences writing diverse and innovative work for big franchises, indie, small press, and web comics.Brandon Thomas(Miranda Mercury),Gene Yang(Avatar: The Last Airbender), Christina Strain (Runaways) andGail Simone(The Movement) will discuss diversity without stereotyping, creating compelling heroes and villains, and reader advocacy.
Sunday July 21, 2013&#160;1:30pm - 2:30pmRoom 23ABC

Hope to see you there!

Racebending.com will be holding our third San Diego ComicCon panel on Sunday, July 21st at 1:30pm in Room 23ABC!   

Shattering Convention in Comic Book Storytelling

Moderated by Racebending.com, this panel of comic book authors discuss their experiences writing diverse and innovative work for big franchises, indie, small press, and web comics.Brandon Thomas(Miranda Mercury),Gene Yang(Avatar: The Last Airbender), Christina Strain (Runaways) andGail Simone(The Movement) will discuss diversity without stereotyping, creating compelling heroes and villains, and reader advocacy.
Sunday July 21, 2013 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 23ABC
Hope to see you there!

Signal Boosting for Stolen Avatar Poster

My car was broken into today (7/21) at a mall in Orange County, CA and a poster I got signed at San Diego ComicCon (and was going to give to my younger brother) was stolen.

It’s the one of the old Gaang that reads “old friends” and it was signed by Bryke, Joaquim, Ryu, and Gurihuru. (Different from the ones that were from the first signing with the signatures from the actors.) If you see it on eBay coming out of a city in Southern California please let me know so I can get the police detective to follow up. (Especially if the seller is also selling a signed copy of How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe or a GPS.)

My brother and I are pretty bummed that the poster is gone but at least no one was hurt. If you see the poster on eBay, please message me and let me know! Thank you! -Marissa

Reblogged from aslantedview  42 notes

I was thinking back on some of my first experiences in the anime convention world, especially memories revolving around racism or racial issues. Inadvertently, these things often still occur. There have been dozens, if not hundreds, of times where convention attendees will come up to me trying to speak Japanese (even though I’m Chinese American), even after I point out that I don’t really speak it. There have been other times where internet/meme culture spills out into reality and people speak as if they really were LOL-cats saying things like “I CAN HAS ASIAN BOY?” to me.

At the first convention we played, Kumoricon 2007, I remember a few conversations with people who seemed to think that Japan was the only country in Asia. When our band was introduced to the convention as an “Asian Dance Rock” band, everyone assumed that we were a Jrock band (we’re not). In fact, some of the non-Asian attendees were upset that we weren’t from Japan, as if our pan-Asian American heritage was somehow less authentic than the other parts of the anime convention.

Honestly, this kind of stuff doesn’t make me upset. I see these as opportunities to educate people and hopefully bring some awareness to the table. As we get ready for another round of conventions this summer, I hope that we’ll be able to melt faces with rock…as well as stereotypes/expectations about Asian culture in general.

By

A Slanted View: Anime Confidential

Simon’s band will be playing at two free San Diego ComicCon after parties next weekend, co-presented by Racebending.com!