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Reblogged from nayobe  3,243 notes

nayobe:

bitchtones:

the legend of korra does women so dirty.

desna and eska have a mother and the fact that she’s so inconsequential is treated like a joke

asami is a prop who is disrespected by everyone around her and no one cares

ginger is assaulted by bolin but he still gets rewarded by her affection at the end

katara has every last drop of personality sucked away from her and shows up to i don’t know make atla fans feel sad

lin’s competence and characterization is fucked with just to prop up mako as the greatest cop ever in the history of everdom

women aren’t the majority movers and shakers in the plot the men are

women don’t have strong relationships to one another and if they do they aren’t given any importance in the plot

korra herself has a decent arc but that’s not enough for me

i don’t want to see one well developed female character i want to see numerous well developed female characters and this show can’t even do the minimum

ugh

Everything here I agree with. But what if that’s how the time period is? The world is becoming modern and it’s sort of close to ours. Even here was had a time where women were treated with disrespect and being objectified, somewhat close to that time, even today.

I know these types of things wasn’t shown much in atla, in fact, the women of atla were dignified and broke all stereotypes to show how strong women can by their own will, but I don’t know.

The “what if that’s how the time period is?” argument needs to be thoroughly debunked.   Not because this is a fictional world and the creators can choose to create whatever characters they want and give those characters whatever significant roles they want, but because it’s completely “off” as an argument, anyway.  

As you note, even today and in the past women have been treated with disrespect and objectified.   But that doesn’t mean women didn’t play important roles in history.   Women continued to work with what agency and social capital they had and played proactive roles in determining their fates.  It’s history makers who have done us all the disservice of pretending that women don’t do anything important when they are marginalized.  This is something that Avatar: The Last Airbender actively subverted by showing characters like Katara, Toph, Yue, and Ursa making decisions even if they had more limited options than the men in their world.  

While writing Avatar: The Last Airbender the writing team was able to take a close look at their story and rewrite two character concepts so that  Katara was not the only woman character in the series.   They changed the concepts of Toph and Azula from boys to girls and added characters like Ty Lee and Mai.    The writers could have been just as thoughtful with The Legend of Korra - Spirits.  

For example, they could have revised the story so that Senna was the heir to the Northern Water Tribe, and Unulaq her younger brother.   In Spirits, we never understood why Unulaq wanted to depose Tonraq.   If Unulaq’s older sibling had been Senna, a callback could have been made to the consequences of Katara’s actions at the North Pole in A:TLA.  The regressive gender politics of the historical Northern Water Tribe would have been a believable motivation for Unulaq stealing the right to rule from an older sister and first woman heir to the water tribe.  Senna fleeing to the South and the South’s desire for independence would have paralleled how Kanna fled to the South in A:TLA.   Senna could have been engaged in the rebellion storyline as a powerful waterbender.   Instead, we see Tonraq leading an all-male Southern Water Tribe rebellion while Senna stays out of the way, and the conflict between Unulaq and Tonraq echoes the Water Tribe brother conflict that we saw play out in Book 1 with Tarlokk and Amon.  

Another option the showrunners could have taken, but did not, was to make President Raiko a woman instead of a man.  This could have illustrated an interesting change in leadership and gender politics in Republic City (going from a Council that only had one woman on it to a woman president.)    The role this character played could just as easily have been filled by a woman character.   Instead, we get President Raiko and his First Lady, Buttercup, who is depicted as easily charmed by Varrick in contrast to her wiser husband.   After being kidnapped, Buttercup doesn’t show up again when Raiko is doing his tactical surveillance (when Bolin brags about his heroic antics, it’s about saving the President and not the President and the First Lady.  At least Joo Lee does a thing.)

It doesn’t make sense that Katara would not be deeply engaged in negotiating the political situation between the two Water Tribes.   And why not let her be proactive in the fight.  Master Waterbender Katara trained two Avatars in waterbending and was likely instrumental in helping Aang negotiate diplomatic situations as partner to the Avatar.   The argument that she is an “older adult who is retired” doesn’t make sense— King Bumi was 100 years old and still a diplomat and fighter.   Actually, it would have been easy to substitute Katara in any of Tonraq’s scenes without greatly impacting the plot.  (Katara even has an established history of fomenting rebellions!)

It’s not the “time period.”   It’s the writers’ choices and decisions.   There were a lot of options available to them.

Reblogged from bryankonietzko  8,864 notes
bryankonietzko:

shoomlah:


My piece for Pixel Drip’s I’m the Avatar, Deal With It! art show coming up later this spring.
-C(GET IT it’s like an old SEP cover because the show’s all old-tymey, I’m so brilliant)


PixelDrip is putting together what promises to be a fantastic Korra fanart gallery show later this month, chock-full of art that people sent in physically and digitally. In addition to all the great art, there will be lots of fun activities and prizes packed into the two-day event. Mike and I, and some other Korra crew members, will likely be dropping by throughout the show. If you’re going to be in Los Angeles on March 23-24, and you’re a fan of Korra and you want to see some cool fanart (like this awesome piece by Claire Hummel) and hang out with other fans, get your tickets and come on down!
Thanks to PixelDrip for organizing this event. It means a lot to us that there are so many people who put so much energy and talent into their appreciation of our show and characters. If I can get my act together in time, I’ll be submitting something for the raffle… stay tuned. Info and links below:
I’m The Art Show, Deal With It!
When: Saturday, March 23rd & Sunday, March 24th, 2013
Location: Monk Space, 4414 West 2nd Street, Los Angeles, CA 90004
Tickets: http://pixeldripgallery.com/tlok/
Schedule: 
Saturday, March 23rd – 10:00am: Opening, 11:00am: 1st Raffle (Small), 1:00pm: 2nd Raffle (Medium), 3:00pm: 3rd Raffle (Large), 4:00pm: Cosplay Contest, 5:00pm: 4th Raffle (Grand), 6:00pm: Closing for VIP Night Setup, VIP Night 7:00pm–2:00am
Sunday, March 24th – 10:00am: Opening, 11:00am: 1st Raffle (Small), 1:00pm: 2nd Raffle (Medium), 3:00pm: 3rd Raffle (Large), 4:00pm: Trivia Contest, 5:00pm: Closing

We’ll be contributing some Racebending shirts to the raffles and I will be displaying two 3-D pieces there!   -M

bryankonietzko:

shoomlah:

My piece for Pixel Drip’s I’m the Avatar, Deal With It! art show coming up later this spring.

-C
(GET IT it’s like an old SEP cover because the show’s all old-tymey, I’m so brilliant)

PixelDrip is putting together what promises to be a fantastic Korra fanart gallery show later this month, chock-full of art that people sent in physically and digitally. In addition to all the great art, there will be lots of fun activities and prizes packed into the two-day event. Mike and I, and some other Korra crew members, will likely be dropping by throughout the show. If you’re going to be in Los Angeles on March 23-24, and you’re a fan of Korra and you want to see some cool fanart (like this awesome piece by Claire Hummel) and hang out with other fans, get your tickets and come on down!

Thanks to PixelDrip for organizing this event. It means a lot to us that there are so many people who put so much energy and talent into their appreciation of our show and characters. If I can get my act together in time, I’ll be submitting something for the raffle… stay tuned. Info and links below:

I’m The Art Show, Deal With It!

When: Saturday, March 23rd & Sunday, March 24th, 2013

Location: Monk Space, 4414 West 2nd Street, Los Angeles, CA 90004

Tickets: http://pixeldripgallery.com/tlok/

Schedule: 

Saturday, March 23rd – 10:00am: Opening, 11:00am: 1st Raffle (Small), 1:00pm: 2nd Raffle (Medium), 3:00pm: 3rd Raffle (Large), 4:00pm: Cosplay Contest, 5:00pm: 4th Raffle (Grand), 6:00pm: Closing for VIP Night Setup, VIP Night 7:00pm–2:00am

Sunday, March 24th – 10:00am: Opening, 11:00am: 1st Raffle (Small), 1:00pm: 2nd Raffle (Medium), 3:00pm: 3rd Raffle (Large), 4:00pm: Trivia Contest, 5:00pm: Closing

We’ll be contributing some Racebending shirts to the raffles and I will be displaying two 3-D pieces there! -M

Reblogged from bigenderbeatnik  7,135 notes

theawesomesauce93:

avatarparallels:

“You’re…You’re just oppressing yourself!”

As much as I love this show, this really bothered me. 

Like the benders clearly had a lot of power over non benders, and a lot of the benders were using that power to oppress non benders. 

But the people who try to fix that are just crazy, bender-hating evil people. 

:|

This part of Legend of Korra was not addressed with a complete understanding or awareness of how systemic oppression functions. There were chances to do so that were missed and parts that were awkward…

In the first scene, Korra is telling off the Equalist protestor. This character is small and unnamed but still kind of significant in that he lays out the Equalist position more clearly than any character in the first few episodes. Other than Amon, this guy is the show’s mouthpiece for exposition about the Equalist movement and what it stands for.

How he is presented kind of bums me out. From the way he talks to Korra he is clearly a sneering and arrogant person. The audience is not supposed to like or identify with him (and it’s difficult to like him, I’m sure he is a joy to be around.) “Social justice” (apparently a horrific word on tumblr) movements are not immune from having people who are unpleasant. In fact, usually these folks are the ones people with privilege point out when they want to invalidate an entire movement. Underneath the bombastic rhetoric protestor dude may be making some valid points, but Korra has the privilege to use this guy’s “unpleasantness” as a reason to dismiss him. (Trying to word this as carefully as I can. Tone argument is messed, but people buy it.)

The audience isn’t shown a “reasonable” Equalists mouthpiece, just this dude and Amon (who turned out to be just another bender appropriating nonbender struggles for his own power, ouch….and yet, oddly appropriate given how easily this can happen with real life -isms.)

There’s pretty much just this protestor. The official website (Welcome to Republic City game) describes him as someone who wants to be at “the center of attention.” Paraphrasing off of Avatar wiki because I don’t have Flash, but he is described a someone who gets attention by “challenging the opinion of the majority.” He pursues his “agenda” full time as a graduate student.” It notes that his parents were nonbenders and liked Avatar Aang and the protestor is contrary to his parent’s opinion. Why? Not, apparently, because of injustice—just attention.

That’s just a WEIRD way of framing this character. Like he’s just someone who is speaking out for attention and not like the presumably thousands of nonbenders who are terrorized by triads or denied representation or recovering from a bender-on-bender war that lasted three generations. (Meanwhile, lots of benders can become the center of attention just by nature of being benders.) This idea that “graduate school” is like the natural place for this guy to fester his beliefs which are just about “going against the majority” and “being a rebel.” (Or whatever people in real life who try to invalidate ethnic studies or women’s studies or LGBT studies or disability studies say about students in those grad departments/fields.)

[To add an additional meta-layer of awkward: The protestor is played by a Latino voice actor, so in this scene (on a meta level), a white woman is telling a Latino guy “you’re oppressing yourselves.” To add another layer of weird, Latino and Asian actors play the more prominent nonbenders (Asami, Mr. Sato, this protestor dude) except for maybe Gommu, while white actors play the more prominent heroes (except for Dante Basco’s one episode Iroh).]

I mean, perhaps the show is set up so we are supposed to empathize with this not-very-lovable protestor to see his point and see a balanced view of the issues (much more easily accomplished by showing some Equalists moderates or someone who wasn’t portrayed as evil or bug-eyed jerk, but sure. Gommu’s quasi-colorblind, kinda cliched, “poverty brings us together” “coexist” stuff is included but never addresses how influences from greater society were resolved in that community.) Perhaps I am supposed to be distraught when Korra roughens the protestor up, even though I get the feeling the show kind of wants me to root for Korra for standing up to him.

Perhaps the show is challenging the audience to consider what Korra is saying or challenging to audience to recognize that Korra is unaware of something big about inequality. If it is, good for it, but even if it is challenging the audience it is really ambiguous and it certainly isn’t challenging Korra in-story. If Korra had more self awareness of her privilege as the freaking Avatar and more empathy towards this nonbender inequality issue as a character, I think fans would be less critical of her. I also think if the show was more firm in presenting some self awareness of systemic inequality (the way it did for feminism and albelism in the original series) people would be less critical of the show.

tl;dr I am thrilled we are having this conversation as a fandom but I wish it had occurred in-show, too!

Let’s see some First Nations/Native American actors in Legend of Korra: Book Two!

Something that really set Avatar: The Last Airbender apart from other Asian-based animated series was the show’s talented voice acting cast.    As Asian American viewers, we particularly appreciated that the show cast so many talented Asian American voice actors, including Dante Basco and Mako!    

With voice actors, there is a lot more versatility in casting because the actor is primarily providing the voice, not the visual character design.   Fittingly, the voice cast of Avatar: The Last Airbender was diverse in many ways.  That being said, it was still meaningful to see so many Asian American actors featured on the series, playing many of the Asian characters.  

With the announcement that the next season of Legend of Korra will be set in the Inuit-inspired Southern Water Tribe, we know that the show will introduce many new Water Tribe characters.   Just as it is rare for Asian American voice actors to have the opportunity to play Asian-inspired characters, it’s also rare for First Nations voice actors to have the opportunity to play characters inspired by their cultures.   The talent is out there waiting to be discovered, and we look forward to seeing it showcased in Book Two!

Reblog if you support increasing the visibility of First Nations/Native American actors in Legend of Korra!

Reblogged from bryankonietzko  5,425 notes
bryankonietzko:

DUKES UP
EDIT: I caught a note that pointed out this pose isn’t good form for fighting. You are correct, sir/madam/other! You wouldn’t want to be this square to your opponent, unless perhaps you were trying to draw he/she/other in to engage. This started as a study from a photo of a female fighter in a pre-fight staredown pose, where the only criteria is looking like a badass.

bryankonietzko:

DUKES UP

EDIT: I caught a note that pointed out this pose isn’t good form for fighting. You are correct, sir/madam/other! You wouldn’t want to be this square to your opponent, unless perhaps you were trying to draw he/she/other in to engage. This started as a study from a photo of a female fighter in a pre-fight staredown pose, where the only criteria is looking like a badass.

Reblogged from acepalindrome  201 notes

Mako and the White Knight Complex

innerpalindrome:

I’m going to preface by saying that I really don’t think Bryke intended for any of this. I have no doubt that they meant for Mako to be a super great guy and his romance with Korra to be beautiful and deep, but this is the Legend of Unfortunate Implications and author intent doesn’t go very far at all. It’s all very good to say, ‘I meant it to be like this!’ but that doesn’t change the fact that the thing created is full of problematic elements.

Now, onto the bulk of this topic. Mako has this tendency to treat the people around him like damsels in distress, and his transition from attraction to Asami to attraction to Korra correlates with Asami becoming stronger and Korra becoming more vulnerable.

Read More

I hope that this ties into Mako’s character development in Season Two. They are pretty big immature character weaknesses and it makes sense that it would become a source of conflict between him and Korra. Mako can be controlling and suffocating and Asami is probably relieved to not be with someone so insensitive. Bolin and Korra still have to deal with him, though. Season two is hopefully an opportunity for Mako to show some growth…

Reblogged from alannadoom  7,637 notes

jazzpha:

masayume85:

awakeningeden:

writingfail:

savagelee:

atlaairbendingrules:

savagelee:

But if all she loves about herself is her bending and not anything else …

Sometimes I just feel like I’m watching an entirely different show from everyone else. *sighs*

I don’t get how Mike/Bryan can say that your abilities should determine your self worth and that if you lose them you aren’t/shouldn’t love yourself anymore. 

Really, it would’ve been wonderful if Korra had cried herself out and then thought- hey, but I’m still the Avatar. I can still help people. And then maybe they cut to a few months later and they show her meditating and understanding herself and helping people and then she meets Aang and restores bending if that had to happen. :-/

I agree. I wish they could’ve shown that people are more than their bending, especially since her rash actions have hinged on her being able to throw power around.

Bryke

just

omg.

what. the. hell.

That is a terrible way to view people. I’m not one to say this usually…but, Bryke? Your privilege is showing.

I’m glad I’m not the only one who saw this flying around and thought, “WTF?” Basically this just proves that Korra only sees herself through her bending and that’s a problem. By just giving her back her bending at the end she learned nothing. Way to fail at story writing Bryke :/ Yes, to love others you have to love yourself, but come on, this is not the way to express that. 

Yet another reason why I think Amon should have stolen her Bending at the end of Episode 4, and Episodes 5-10 should have been about Korra learning that her Bending wasn’t the Alpha and Omega of her existence.

Alas. Bitching fight scenes and love triangles are more important.

    theiwatobipool asked
    What's your opinion on racebending POCs to other POCs? I was wondering about this after seeing a Fire-Nation Korra with Water Tribe bending brothers

    Answer:

    Now this is a really interesting in universe question!  Someone summon Bryke!

    It really goes back to how “race” in the Avatar world is socially constructed.  Is it based on the element you (or your relatives) can bend?  The color of your eyes or skin?  Or the country you live in?

    We know that in the original series, Katara, Toph, Sokka, and Aang pretend to be “Fire Nation” and successfully pass by explaining that they are “from the colonies.”  Because of the culture’s policy of imperialism and assimilation of conquered peoples, these characters were able to (pretend to) identify as Fire Nation relatively smoothly.  

    Another example might be the character of Ty Lee.  In the series, she identifies as Fire Nation; it’s the nation she grew up in.  But—look closely —her physical appearance (hair and eye color), personality, and “bending” skill set would imply that she is actually descended from Air Nomads.  And, at the end of the series, Ty Lee joins the Kyoshi Warriors, so will Ty Lee come to identify as Earth Kingdom instead?  Or is she always going to be Fire Nation by birth?  Is she actually Air Nomad all along unbeknownst to her?  Is she “racebending”?   Or are the lines (social constructs) defining the Four Nations “bending” now that national integrity is no longer under threat from Fire Nation imperialism?

    Is there a history, for example, of Fire Nation actors portraying characters from other nations in an oppressive manner?  Are people from Earth or Water tribes forced to change their physical appearance to fit in?  Is there colorism?  I think that within the context of the Avatar world, bending Korra to be “Fire Nation” is different from bending Korra to look more (real world) white.  Unless, of course…those motivations are intersecting…

There is something that I notice about Kya’s design„„

So this is the official design of Kya for Season 2 of Legend of Korra, but I see a difference with her hair style.

This drawing of Kya came out in public before the design above. To me, it appears that the Kya below have a dreadlocks influenced hair style. The Kya above clearly does not. Is this a form of whitewashing?

[Racebending Mod Note:  Though the bottom image is a scan from the Korra promo kit, and the image above is a photo from the ComicCon panel, and the images look drawn by different artists, it does seem like in the image on top, Kya has lighter skin (it is kind of orange-ish and inconsistent with other Water Tribe characters we’ve seen) and her hair looks less like it is in dreads than in the first image, where her hairstyle looks like dreadlocks.  The top image deemphasizes physical character traits that make her unique and I hope they go with the original concept in the second season.]

Signal Boosting for Stolen Avatar Poster

My car was broken into today (7/21) at a mall in Orange County, CA and a poster I got signed at San Diego ComicCon (and was going to give to my younger brother) was stolen.

It’s the one of the old Gaang that reads “old friends” and it was signed by Bryke, Joaquim, Ryu, and Gurihuru. (Different from the ones that were from the first signing with the signatures from the actors.) If you see it on eBay coming out of a city in Southern California please let me know so I can get the police detective to follow up. (Especially if the seller is also selling a signed copy of How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe or a GPS.)

My brother and I are pretty bummed that the poster is gone but at least no one was hurt. If you see the poster on eBay, please message me and let me know! Thank you! -Marissa

In line for the Korra panel at ComicCon

People have been in line since 7pm last night for today’s 11am Korra panel. There are hundreds of people and the panel is still five hours away!

Even though there are fans from Community and Firefly here too, Korra fans are the first in line! Alvin, an Aang cosplayer, is second in line and sleeping on his stuffed Appa pillow.

Entertainment Weekly has already announced Season Two!