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    ritualofthehabit asked
    hey is there any way you can tag dumb asks, some of the things people say aren't necessarily deserving of trigger warnings but i hate seeing people say things like "LBGTs" and "a transgender" - hurtful words that I take the time to stop and correct irl but kinda want a break from on tumblr. I really really love your blog but i don't want to see those people on my dash

    Answer:

    Sorry about this!   Trying to tag everything I can with the tags “cissexism” and “transmisogyny” if you want to tumblr savior those, but I am open to suggestion for other tags if it helps!  - M

    Tumblr blog transhollywood notes that the people who are writing in upset with their critique of Leto’s role in Dallas Buyers Club:

    "…tend to have no concept of trans people, our culture, or our terminology but [still] have a strong belief we are being represented well."

    If they’re so certain that this is appropriate—in fact, excellent—representation for trans people and the trans community, why can’t they even get basic language straight?   

    EDIT:  Also important to note that “dumb” is a problematic and hurtful term for some people, too—not to mention, it’s not even all that accurate.   I’m thinking more “ignorant.”

Reblogged from girljanitor  23,017 notes

girljanitor:

tiny-librarian:

It is a controversial topic and one that may make for uncomfortable viewing.

BBC drama Call The Midwife is to tell the story of a pair of disabled lovers forced apart and ridiculed after the woman becomes pregnant.

Disability charities yesterday welcomed the plotline, saying it highlights how far society has come since the judgmental 1950s in which the programme is set.

The episode, which is to be aired on Sunday night, will feature the characters of Sally Harper, who has Down’s syndrome, and Jacob Milligan, who has cerebral palsy.

The pair live in an institution, having been sent there by their parents – as was common at  the time.

But after they fall in love and Sally becomes pregnant, the  couple are separated and Sally faces ridicule from her mother and father.

The episode deals with the prejudice and stigma she would have experienced.

Call The Midwife is shown on BBC One before the nine o’clock watershed, and in the past storylines featuring abortion, incest and infidelity have shocked viewers. But yesterday campaigners welcomed the inclusion of disability and love as a theme.

The character of Sally is played by Sarah Gordy, and Jacob by Colin Young. Both actors have the disability that they portray on screen.

Both actors have the disability that they portray on screen.

Both actors have the disability that they portray on screen.

Reblogged from nethilia  373 notes

nethilia:

americangirlliz:

cindermella:

so American Girl revealed their latest American Girl doll.

and I couldn’t help cracking up at the first paragraph as well as the actual doll.

image

Diversity and the “All American Girl” at it’s finest.

Diverse races and interests as well as physical differences and disabilities?

Yeah…AG let the ball drop on this one.

AG is so good at diversity! Let us introduce this able-bodied white blonde dancer girl who is white like almost all our GotY have been! Oh but she has highlights! Pink hair counts as diverse, right?

*glares*

    readingpolitics asked
    I think it is a little irresponsible to heap praise on the Wedding Palace poster without passing any comment whatsoever on the way it sensationalizes mental illness. "craziest family!" also carries connotations of unchecked abuse played for laughs.

    Answer:
    Ableism and familial abuse can hit harder and be more invisible along racial and socioeconomic lines, too.
    Thank you for noting this. The marketing is very uncomfortable, especially the idea that the customs of non-white American cultures are “crazy” or dysfunctional. It can be very otherizing and in this case, also perpetrate ableism.
Reblogged from jordanwritenow  245 notes

New York City: The whitewash effect

jordanwritenow:

I was thinking about the time I visited NYC a few years ago and how I came away with the revelation that there was so much diversity.  In one subway car I would see so many different people with different ethnic backgrounds; it was amazing.  Why was I so surprised?  White washing.  The older I get, the more I see how apparent it is.  The shows based in New York City that I watch have predominantly white casts.  Why is that? 

Sadly, there are only a few exceptions of shows that either have recurring characters or stars that are something other than white:

30 Rock, Law and Order, The Mindy Project, The Cosby Show, The Jeffersons, Diff’rent Strokes, Everybody Hates Chris, and Ugly Betty. 

Of course these are only a sample of the shows based in New York City, but they’re enough to help my point.  New York City is insanely terribly misrepresented on TV.  I’m not the first to criticize this error in television; I just hope we all see this and want it to change. 

Good points (edited slightly for ableist language, though)

Reblogged from str8nochaser  626 notes

str8nochaser:

venusmizu24:

hamburgerjack:

arainbowbrightly:

So I just downloaded the latest version of Gimp, and I was floored by one of the new features.

WHOA WHY IS THAT UNDER “BEAUTIFY?”

And you have decided that darker skin is “little flesh” and whiter skin is “high flesh?” I AM CONCERNED ABOUT THIS.

Gina Torres, pre and post-“beautification.” WELL THANK GOD SHE HAS “HIGH FLESH” NOW INSTEAD OF “LITTLE FLESH.”

WHY IS THIS HAPPENING?

Well

*glances at gimp* I knew I was smart not to trust you. 

Wait… so “beautify” has a feature that will lighten skin??

Oh shadeism, you so sneaky.

Colorism and ableism, too.

"Considering the vast experience of many short actors working in the film industry today, I think it inexcusable that in casting for Snow White & the Huntsman, producers did not utilize this pool of talent.

"My colleague Peter Dinklage won an Emmy for his performance in Game of Thrones, proving that short actors need roles that will not only challenge them, but allow them to express themselves as actors in their own right. It is not acceptable to ‘black up’ as a white actor, so why should it be acceptable to ‘shrink’ an actor to play a dwarf?"

By

actor Warwick Davis speaks out in support of a statement issued by The Little People of America.

"Little People of America supports the equality of opportunity for the employment of little people in all industries," said spokesman Gary Arnold. "Of course, this includes the entertainment industry, which we believe should cast little people in the full breadth of possible roles. This means both casting people with dwarfism as characters that were specifically written to be played by little people and other roles that would be open to average height people and people of short stature.”

Reblogged from moniquill  4,397 notes

Every time you try to silence someone and tell them that they shouldn’t be hurt, shouldn’t be offended, shouldn’t choose this battle, that this isn’t important - you are serving the hurtful rather than the hurt.

By Moniquilliloquies.  in response to a poster being dismissive towards people upset about an ableist meme.
Reblogged from beeftony  1,731 notes
beeftony:

(Trigger Warning for Ableism and Abuse)
Okay, rant time, because this is something that really grinds my gears. Listen closely, because I’m only going to say this once:
Azula is not fucking crazy.
Yes, she’s dangerous. Yes, she manipulates people and torments her brother and uses fear to keep her friends in line. Yes, she suffers a mental breakdown at the end of the series because her entire life turns upside down and she doesn’t know how to deal with it. Does any of that indicate any sort of mental illness?
FUCK. NO.
For one thing, it’s a diagnosis none of us are qualified to make (unless there’s an actual psychologist reading this, in which case, feel free to weigh in). A term I see thrown around a lot when it comes to Azula is “sociopath,” often using her more sadistic tendencies as evidence. Diagnosing that sort of thing is not as simple as opening up a Wikipedia article and going down a checklist. It takes hours of observation to make an informed diagnosis on this sort of thing, and the sad thing is that a lot of people display some of the hallmarks of the disorder. The reason it’s called a disorder is because people who suffer from it display those tendencies to an extreme not seen in so-called “normal” people.
Another thing to consider is her age. A vast majority of psychologists will flat out refuse to diagnose anybody under age eighteen with any sort of personality disorder for the simple fact that kids can be cruel. Don’t forget that Zuko threw rocks at the turtle ducks too because he thought it was acceptable behavior and only stopped after his mother corrected him. And that’s the difference between them: nobody ever really stepped in to tell Azula “no.”
And newsflash: psycho/sociopaths are not Hannibal Lecter. With very few exceptions, most of them lead perfectly normal lives. Azula’s cunning, manipulation and charisma are all products of her natural personality, and not indicative of any sort of mental illness. In fact, there is a very simple explanation for why Azula acts the way she does:
Azula was raised in an abusive household.
No two children respond to abuse the same way, and where Zuko always disappointed his father, she was the favored one, and it’s very common behavior among children with abusive parents to let one sibling take the fall for something so that they look better in comparison and can reap all the love that the other sibling is denied. It’s not even hatred of the other sibling that produces this behavior: it’s a learned response that arises out of a need to survive.
This, by the way, explains why Azula was so desperate to get Zuko on her side and back home instead of simply killing him. If she hated him, she would have ended him a lot earlier instead of trying to convert him. Because while Zuko was around to draw Ozai’s scrutiny, she was free to be his perfect little angel and had a scapegoat to pin things on. Once Zuko got banished, all of Ozai’s unreasonable expectations became hers to bear alone, and she wanted to get him back because she knew that if she took one wrong step she wouldn’t have her father’s favor anymore.
Even her casual dismissal of Lu Ten’s death and desire for Ozai to take the throne from Iroh can be explained by her reaction to Iroh’s gift. I don’t think he meant to be sexist about it, just like he probably didn’t mean to be ableist in the quote above. He’s just not very close to her, so like any well-meaning family member he gets her a gift he thinks she would like because “all girls like dolls.” The message this sends to her, though, is that Iroh thinks that she should behave in a more “girly” manner, like her mother.
To Azula, a girl who prides herself on being an awesome firebender who makes her father proud, this presents a dilemma. She can either stand by and let Iroh become Fire Lord, which from her perspective means that she won’t be encouraged to be a great firebender who kicks ass but a more traditional, feminine Princess, or she can do something about it. Even her mother thinks that there’s something wrong with her, and says as much, though not to her face. Ozai, on the other hand, not only doesn’t mind that she doesn’t stick with “girly” activities, but is actually proud of her firebending abilities. To Azula’s eight year old mind, the only way that she can continue to be herself is if her father takes the throne.
Look at how much she was affected when Ozai made her Fire Lord and then rendered that meaningless by declaring himself the Phoenix King. Right before that she said, “You can’t treat me like Zuko!” which indicates that her greatest fear was failing to live up to her father’s unrealistic expectations for his children, a burden she had thus far managed to foist on Zuko. When Ozai tasked her with hunting down Iroh and Zuko, she conquered Ba Sing Se, captured Iroh, converted Zuko, and killed the Avatar. She went above and beyond out of a desire for the love and acceptance that children naturally crave, and when Ozai demonstrated that it meant nothing to him, it was the last fucking straw on a foundation that had already been weakened by Mai and Ty Lee’s betrayal.
Absolutely none of this, by the way, indicates that she had any sort of preexisting mental condition. She is just as much a product of her environment as Zuko , and what’s more, she is the inverse of Zuko. Zuko never got the love and acceptance he craved from Ozai, but Azula got to enjoy it for a while and then when she realized that she never really had his love either, she completely came apart.
I hate, hate, hate when people call Azula crazy, because it reinforces the stereotype that mental illnesses naturally make a person dangerous. Here’s a thought: maybe she suffered a psychotic break because her life rested on pillars, and when those were knocked away she didn’t know how to respond. She was already dangerous, and the only reason she was able to be beaten is because she was slipping. As in, acting like a lunatic made her less effective.
Blaming Azula’s more extreme personality flaws on some amorphous condition that doesn’t fit any actual disorders is insulting to the people who do have those disorders and manage not to be the dangerous lunatics that television and movies love to portray them as. It’s ill-informed and really pisses me off, and I’m not the only one out there.
So please, don’t call her crazy. Call her what she is: Dangerous. Manipulative. Cruel. Tragic. Overburdened by her father’s expecations and desperate for somebody to love her. But not crazy. Never crazy.
/rant

beeftony:

(Trigger Warning for Ableism and Abuse)

Okay, rant time, because this is something that really grinds my gears. Listen closely, because I’m only going to say this once:

Azula is not fucking crazy.

Yes, she’s dangerous. Yes, she manipulates people and torments her brother and uses fear to keep her friends in line. Yes, she suffers a mental breakdown at the end of the series because her entire life turns upside down and she doesn’t know how to deal with it. Does any of that indicate any sort of mental illness?

FUCK. NO.

For one thing, it’s a diagnosis none of us are qualified to make (unless there’s an actual psychologist reading this, in which case, feel free to weigh in). A term I see thrown around a lot when it comes to Azula is “sociopath,” often using her more sadistic tendencies as evidence. Diagnosing that sort of thing is not as simple as opening up a Wikipedia article and going down a checklist. It takes hours of observation to make an informed diagnosis on this sort of thing, and the sad thing is that a lot of people display some of the hallmarks of the disorder. The reason it’s called a disorder is because people who suffer from it display those tendencies to an extreme not seen in so-called “normal” people.

Another thing to consider is her age. A vast majority of psychologists will flat out refuse to diagnose anybody under age eighteen with any sort of personality disorder for the simple fact that kids can be cruel. Don’t forget that Zuko threw rocks at the turtle ducks too because he thought it was acceptable behavior and only stopped after his mother corrected him. And that’s the difference between them: nobody ever really stepped in to tell Azula “no.”

And newsflash: psycho/sociopaths are not Hannibal Lecter. With very few exceptions, most of them lead perfectly normal lives. Azula’s cunning, manipulation and charisma are all products of her natural personality, and not indicative of any sort of mental illness. In fact, there is a very simple explanation for why Azula acts the way she does:

Azula was raised in an abusive household.

No two children respond to abuse the same way, and where Zuko always disappointed his father, she was the favored one, and it’s very common behavior among children with abusive parents to let one sibling take the fall for something so that they look better in comparison and can reap all the love that the other sibling is denied. It’s not even hatred of the other sibling that produces this behavior: it’s a learned response that arises out of a need to survive.

This, by the way, explains why Azula was so desperate to get Zuko on her side and back home instead of simply killing him. If she hated him, she would have ended him a lot earlier instead of trying to convert him. Because while Zuko was around to draw Ozai’s scrutiny, she was free to be his perfect little angel and had a scapegoat to pin things on. Once Zuko got banished, all of Ozai’s unreasonable expectations became hers to bear alone, and she wanted to get him back because she knew that if she took one wrong step she wouldn’t have her father’s favor anymore.

Even her casual dismissal of Lu Ten’s death and desire for Ozai to take the throne from Iroh can be explained by her reaction to Iroh’s gift. I don’t think he meant to be sexist about it, just like he probably didn’t mean to be ableist in the quote above. He’s just not very close to her, so like any well-meaning family member he gets her a gift he thinks she would like because “all girls like dolls.” The message this sends to her, though, is that Iroh thinks that she should behave in a more “girly” manner, like her mother.

To Azula, a girl who prides herself on being an awesome firebender who makes her father proud, this presents a dilemma. She can either stand by and let Iroh become Fire Lord, which from her perspective means that she won’t be encouraged to be a great firebender who kicks ass but a more traditional, feminine Princess, or she can do something about it. Even her mother thinks that there’s something wrong with her, and says as much, though not to her face. Ozai, on the other hand, not only doesn’t mind that she doesn’t stick with “girly” activities, but is actually proud of her firebending abilities. To Azula’s eight year old mind, the only way that she can continue to be herself is if her father takes the throne.

Look at how much she was affected when Ozai made her Fire Lord and then rendered that meaningless by declaring himself the Phoenix King. Right before that she said, “You can’t treat me like Zuko!” which indicates that her greatest fear was failing to live up to her father’s unrealistic expectations for his children, a burden she had thus far managed to foist on Zuko. When Ozai tasked her with hunting down Iroh and Zuko, she conquered Ba Sing Se, captured Iroh, converted Zuko, and killed the Avatar. She went above and beyond out of a desire for the love and acceptance that children naturally crave, and when Ozai demonstrated that it meant nothing to him, it was the last fucking straw on a foundation that had already been weakened by Mai and Ty Lee’s betrayal.

Absolutely none of this, by the way, indicates that she had any sort of preexisting mental condition. She is just as much a product of her environment as Zuko , and what’s more, she is the inverse of Zuko. Zuko never got the love and acceptance he craved from Ozai, but Azula got to enjoy it for a while and then when she realized that she never really had his love either, she completely came apart.

I hate, hate, hate when people call Azula crazy, because it reinforces the stereotype that mental illnesses naturally make a person dangerous. Here’s a thought: maybe she suffered a psychotic break because her life rested on pillars, and when those were knocked away she didn’t know how to respond. She was already dangerous, and the only reason she was able to be beaten is because she was slipping. As in, acting like a lunatic made her less effective.

Blaming Azula’s more extreme personality flaws on some amorphous condition that doesn’t fit any actual disorders is insulting to the people who do have those disorders and manage not to be the dangerous lunatics that television and movies love to portray them as. It’s ill-informed and really pisses me off, and I’m not the only one out there.

So please, don’t call her crazy. Call her what she is: Dangerous. Manipulative. Cruel. Tragic. Overburdened by her father’s expecations and desperate for somebody to love her. But not crazy. Never crazy.

/rant