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Reblogged from angrywocunited  636 notes

I love Zoe Saldana’s work. I’ve seen some of her movies more than once and really enjoy what she brings to the screen. As an actress I respect her process, but I also know that there are many actresses out there, known or not, who would be great as my mother. The one actress that I’ve had in my heart for a very long time, whose work I’m familiar with already, is Kimberly Elise. Many people have spoken to me about Viola. I love her look. I love her energy. Both of the actresses that I’ve mentioned are women of color, are women with beautiful, luscious lips and wide noses, and who know their craft. I also have no problem introducing someone we’ve never heard of before who can play my mother. How does someone just decide to do a story about someone and completely bypass family? Completely bypass her representatives? … I talked with [the director, Cynthia Mort] once, about a year and a half ago. It was very emotional for me to just get on the phone with her because there were so many questions in my mind… I asked her if her mother was still alive. I asked her if she still had a good relationship with her mother and she sounded like a really nice lady. She really, really believes in what she’s doing. I do remember saying to her that if any of us tried to take the story of Bing Crosby or, Dean Martin, or Frank Sinatra, or Elvis Presley and turn it into something that was a tall tale based on something that never happened, I doubt that we’d get very far. My mother’s life was tragic enough. My mother suffered enough. Her life is full of enough wonderful and tragic true things to make a hit movie. You don’t have to embellish her story.

By Lisa Simone (Nina Simone’s daughter) addressing the serious problems with the Nina Simone biopic starring Zoe Saldana
(via angrywocunited)
Reblogged from phoenixfalls  5,913 notes

phoenixfalls:

I remember talking to my mother and seeing Snow White and wondering if there’d ever be Chocolate Brown or something like that. But my parents were very good at making sure I had dolls that looked like me, and books with brown children in them, and birthday cards with brown children on them. They were very aware. When you discount a child from fantasy, it’s a very strong statement. You think, Wow, somebody made an entire movie with elves, and trees that talk, and things that fly, and there was no room for me.

Anika Noni Rose in Vanity Fair. (Interview by Alex Beggs; Photographs by Justin Bishop.)

Reblogged from fullonmonets  507 notes

But why do I keep coming back to Arianne being my character when there are other fantastic female characters in Dorne? In the series as a whole? Why does this feel like such a personal slight, as well as socially irresponsible?

The answer I keep coming back to is that when I read the books, I picture Prince Doran Martell as my dad.

It truly means more than I can possibly say that they cast Alexander Siddig as Doran Martell. Even better, he looks nothing like my dad, which I’ll be grateful for when they give him a sexposition scene. However, his casting would mean more to me if they had given him a daughter. A willful daughter who fought him, and did not listen to him, and loved him, and eventually came around to understanding him. To the best of my memory, the only tender scene between an Arab man and his daughter I’ve ever watched on screen — and I watch A LOT of television and movies — is in Aladdin. So that’s fucking upsetting.

I had a horse in this race and HBO shot it and the jockey out back before the starting signal. I needed this. And If I needed this, I can’t imagine how many other girls of color out there needed this. Given the prevailing cruel and sexist stereotypes of Middle Eastern men in American media and culture, I can’t imagine how much good a hit show like Game of Thrones could do by simply having a strong and complex father-daughter narrative.

I’m not saying television owes me anything. But what I am saying is that cutting an Arab (or North African, or Indian) woman who’s the center of her story is more than “streamlining” the show. It’s actively hostile, it’s lazy, it’s sexist, it’s racist, and it’s a big deal.

By from If Arianne Martell Isn’t in Game of Thrones, I’m Going to Flip a Fucking Table and You’re All Just Going to Have to Deal with It by Sara. (via fullonmonets)
Reblogged from oldfilmsflicker  4,433 notes
oldfilmsflicker:


In Jonah from Tonga (a 6 part ‘mockumentary’ tv series to be shown on HBO) the main character, Jonah, is a criminal teenage Australian boy of Tongan roots. There are several areas of serious concern with this series.First, Jonah is played by a Caucasian, 39-year-old Australian in brown face make-up and a curly haired wig. Brownface in 2014, really?Second, Jonah is clearly identified as ‘Tongan’. The name of the show is Jonah from Tonga. The series starts in ‘Tonga’. The logo is a caricature of of a ‘Tiki’ carving. Etc. We get it. You want us to think it’s about a Tongan. And for Americans, most of whom have little previous knowledge about Tonga, this series will shape the way they think about the nation, its culture, and its people. So what will they learn?1. All the teenage ‘Tongan’ boys shown in the series are low achievers, gang members, or in jail. The school’s high achievers are Caucasians.2. Much of the ‘comedy’ is derived from this blackface/brownfaced ‘Tongan’ character’s acts of violence, sexual aggression, ignorance and profanity. This is problematic not only because of the show’s astounding inherent racism, but because much of his behavior is deeply counter to Tongan culture. He swears at his sister and his father. He is extremely disrespectful to teachers. He makes sexual edvances on his cousin. He is sexually suggestive to his Aunt and a Nun. And much, much more. All this is deeply offensive in Tongan culture. Tonga is a devoutly religious country, very family-oriented, with one of the highest PhD rates per capital. None of this is reflected in Jonah from Tonga.3. In another nod to the racism of minstrel shows, Jonah’s only saving talent is presented as dancing, and his brother’s as singing.4. The excuse given for all this is ‘lighten up, it’s only comedy’. First, even reviewers who liked it thought it was not that funny. A typicalreview is: “the documentary truth of the situation and the people seems more important than the laughs here” (Julia Raeside, The Guardian). Which captures the problem  — many viewers will assume there is a ‘documentary truth’ in the series that teaches them something about Tonga. And it will be equally unfunny when a Tongan boy, already doing his best to fit in an American high school, gets taunted with a variation of ‘Hey Jonah - show us your dXXk tattoo!’Tonga is a loyal friend of the US. It has troops in Afganistan, large, devout communities in Salt Lake City, academics in US higher education,  and players in major US sports teams. This show drives a wedge in that relationship. And for what?  The only saving grace is that Jonah from Tonga was a ratings disaster in Australia and the UK.Young Tongans have been taking to Change.org, Facebook and Twitter (#MyNameIsNOTJonah) to try to get the message out that they are not like Jonah. They are listing academic achievements, work in the community, the fact that they have no criminal record. They shouldn’t have to. Please HBO, Mr. Lilley, Ms. Brunt and Ms. Waters, please don’t slander a whole nation and sacrifice the future of young Tongans for the sake of this series. It WILL affect them.We, the undersigned, ask you to please do the right thing and pullJonah from Tonga from the schedule. It won’t cost you that much but running it will cost Tonga, and Tongans a lot, for years to come.

Petition | Please pull Jonah from Tonga from HBO | Change.org

oldfilmsflicker:

In Jonah from Tonga (a 6 part ‘mockumentary’ tv series to be shown on HBO) the main character, Jonah, is a criminal teenage Australian boy of Tongan roots. There are several areas of serious concern with this series.

First, Jonah is played by a Caucasian, 39-year-old Australian in brown face make-up and a curly haired wig. Brownface in 2014, really?

Second, Jonah is clearly identified as ‘Tongan’. The name of the show is Jonah from Tonga. The series starts in ‘Tonga’. The logo is a caricature of of a ‘Tiki’ carving. Etc. We get it. You want us to think it’s about a Tongan. And for Americans, most of whom have little previous knowledge about Tonga, this series will shape the way they think about the nation, its culture, and its people. So what will they learn?

1. All the teenage ‘Tongan’ boys shown in the series are low achievers, gang members, or in jail. The school’s high achievers are Caucasians.

2. Much of the ‘comedy’ is derived from this blackface/brownfaced ‘Tongan’ character’s acts of violence, sexual aggression, ignorance and profanity. This is problematic not only because of the show’s astounding inherent racism, but because much of his behavior is deeply counter to Tongan culture. He swears at his sister and his father. He is extremely disrespectful to teachers. He makes sexual edvances on his cousin. He is sexually suggestive to his Aunt and a Nun. And much, much more. All this is deeply offensive in Tongan culture. Tonga is a devoutly religious country, very family-oriented, with one of the highest PhD rates per capital. None of this is reflected in Jonah from Tonga.

3. In another nod to the racism of minstrel shows, Jonah’s only saving talent is presented as dancing, and his brother’s as singing.

4. The excuse given for all this is ‘lighten up, it’s only comedy’. First, even reviewers who liked it thought it was not that funny. A typicalreview is: “the documentary truth of the situation and the people seems more important than the laughs here” (Julia Raeside, The Guardian). Which captures the problem  — many viewers will assume there is a ‘documentary truth’ in the series that teaches them something about Tonga. And it will be equally unfunny when a Tongan boy, already doing his best to fit in an American high school, gets taunted with a variation of ‘Hey Jonah - show us your dXXk tattoo!’

Tonga is a loyal friend of the US. It has troops in Afganistan, large, devout communities in Salt Lake City, academics in US higher education,  and players in major US sports teams. This show drives a wedge in that relationship. And for what?  The only saving grace is that Jonah from Tonga was a ratings disaster in Australia and the UK.

Young Tongans have been taking to Change.orgFacebook and Twitter (#MyNameIsNOTJonah) to try to get the message out that they are not like Jonah. They are listing academic achievements, work in the community, the fact that they have no criminal record. They shouldn’t have to. Please HBO, Mr. Lilley, Ms. Brunt and Ms. Waters, please don’t slander a whole nation and sacrifice the future of young Tongans for the sake of this series. It WILL affect them.

We, the undersigned, ask you to please do the right thing and pullJonah from Tonga from the schedule. It won’t cost you that much but running it will cost Tonga, and Tongans a lot, for years to come.

Petition | Please pull Jonah from Tonga from HBO | Change.org

Chris Lilley

thatalienatedblackgirl:

I remember first being introduced to Chris Lilley via his show Summer Heights High on HBO. I loved it and thought it was funny. So when his new show, Angry Boys, was announced I was ecstatic.

Finally, a show that was funny and different. But all that changed when I saw this 30-something year old white Australian man not only in blackface, but yellowface.

Even though I knew what black and yellowface were and that they had long racist pasts, none of that clicked in my mind while I watched Angry Boys. My mind didn’t put two and two together—that a white man in brown make up donning an Afro wig and appropriating AAVE playing as a wannabe rapper and that same white man in a black wig speaking tight, broken English playing as a Japanese woman who was trying to make money off her son by saying he was gay (he wasn’t)—meant that he was a disgusting human being.

For whatever reason I never saw him as racist. I felt very uncomfortable whenever these two characters showed up on screen, but I couldn’t place where these feelings were coming from. That uneasiness, that discomfort.

One could say it was because of my age. I think I was barely in high school at the time these shows were on but that still doesn’t make any sense. For one, I’m black. I think I should know what’s racist and what isn’t. Yet oddly enough I couldn’t. For some strange reason I could not.

It’s not until now that I’m 17 that I can see racism (and sexism, for I am a girl) from a 10 mile radius. I can now see all the blatant racist, homophobia, and sexism in Lilley’s shows that was staring back at me 3 years ago as if from now open eyes.

So when I discovered that Jonah from Tonga was a new show where Lilley was going to star as another character from his previous series Summer Heights High via Wikipedia with the description of

"The mockumentary series follows Jonah Takalua, a rebellious 14-year-old Australian boy of Tongan descent (played by 39 year old Caucasian Chris Lilley in brownface make-up and a curly wig) who was previously seen in Lilley’s series Summer Heights High.

[…]

The series was called “racist”,
[8] “creepy”[9] and “dreadful”[10] and spawned an online protest movement by young Tongans concerned at how Lilley’s inaccurate portrayal might affect their communities and futures.” (X)

I realized how deeply ingrained his racism was in his so-called “comedy.” It pulled back S.mouse and Jen Okazaki from Angry Boys and Jonah Takalua and those racist moments with Ja’mie from Summer Heights High.

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I now know that I cannot watch another one of his shows. I cannot support a man—a white man—in any way that is making money off of being a complete and utter racist when there are so many other ways to be even slightly “funny.”

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Reblogged from princelesscomic  901 notes
princelesscomic:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/787527503/illegal-by-jeremy-whitley-and-heather-nunnelly
In “Illegal” I wanted to take that same sort of story - a girl from Mexico who has an abusive father and no future worth speaking of makes a split second decision with her mother to leave it behind in favor of a chance to do or be something better.  But what I also wanted to do was bring in the current landscape of modern technology, government surveillance, and the increasingly ridiculous state of immigration reform in the US.
The thing that always bothers me about sci-fi stories is that we come in so late in the story.  We only really see and learn about the government corruption and abuse when it threatens the life of our well to do young white and male protagonist.  That’s not the beginning.  First they isolate the outsiders: the poor, the sick, the powerless, the minorities.  If the government is turning against the young strong white men, then a lot has already gone down.  Where are the stories of the sick who were experimented on?  Where are the stories of the minorities whose cries of racism were ignored?  Where are the stories of the ones who aren’t missed when the government turns on them, because the government convinced you that their very presence was illegal?
What resulted was “Illegal”, a story about Gianna Delrey - a young woman who is living outside the system and in constant danger of being arrested and detained just for daring to exist in America.  But the America she knows is one where the rich live high above the ground in rooftop villas and build themselves neighborhoods they never have to leave hundreds of feet in the air.  One where the poor and undocumented are forced to live off the scraps and face constant harassment from the authorities.
But in a world where every move of every citizen is tracked - from their location to their purchases to who they meet - being invisible can present an interesting opportunity in the right hands.  And when one of her upper class employers decides to turn on her, Gianna finds herself on the run and falling in with a group that deals in black market identities.  
I wanted to see the insane chases through the skyscrapers the make up the city.  I wanted to add elements of parkour and sci-fi action.  In a world that’s packed full of people stacked into massive buildings, it’s possible to have a foot chase hundreds of feet in the air.  Gianna will be jumping out of apartment skyscrapers and onto rooftop gardens with no net and no chance of rescue.  Gianna and her new friends will be using the skyscrapers under which they’ve been buried as their paths weapons and escape routes.
FROM HEATHER
When Jeremy pitched to me Illegal I was immediately grabbed by the concept, and the fact that GIanna was the female lead. For a while I had wanted to draw a comic with a woman main character, and I was glad that I was able to collaborate with Jeremy on the project. The script was very in depth and explored a lot of politics that we deal with today –racism, sexism, abuse, and the immigrant system. It was a very powerful piece that I think comic books fans today would thoroughly enjoy. Illegal is smart, daring, and different. It stood out to me, and I I am confident others will feel the same.

princelesscomic:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/787527503/illegal-by-jeremy-whitley-and-heather-nunnelly

In “Illegal” I wanted to take that same sort of story - a girl from Mexico who has an abusive father and no future worth speaking of makes a split second decision with her mother to leave it behind in favor of a chance to do or be something better.  But what I also wanted to do was bring in the current landscape of modern technology, government surveillance, and the increasingly ridiculous state of immigration reform in the US.

The thing that always bothers me about sci-fi stories is that we come in so late in the story.  We only really see and learn about the government corruption and abuse when it threatens the life of our well to do young white and male protagonist.  That’s not the beginning.  First they isolate the outsiders: the poor, the sick, the powerless, the minorities.  If the government is turning against the young strong white men, then a lot has already gone down.  Where are the stories of the sick who were experimented on?  Where are the stories of the minorities whose cries of racism were ignored?  Where are the stories of the ones who aren’t missed when the government turns on them, because the government convinced you that their very presence was illegal?

What resulted was “Illegal”, a story about Gianna Delrey - a young woman who is living outside the system and in constant danger of being arrested and detained just for daring to exist in America.  But the America she knows is one where the rich live high above the ground in rooftop villas and build themselves neighborhoods they never have to leave hundreds of feet in the air.  One where the poor and undocumented are forced to live off the scraps and face constant harassment from the authorities.

But in a world where every move of every citizen is tracked - from their location to their purchases to who they meet - being invisible can present an interesting opportunity in the right hands.  And when one of her upper class employers decides to turn on her, Gianna finds herself on the run and falling in with a group that deals in black market identities.  

I wanted to see the insane chases through the skyscrapers the make up the city.  I wanted to add elements of parkour and sci-fi action.  In a world that’s packed full of people stacked into massive buildings, it’s possible to have a foot chase hundreds of feet in the air.  Gianna will be jumping out of apartment skyscrapers and onto rooftop gardens with no net and no chance of rescue.  Gianna and her new friends will be using the skyscrapers under which they’ve been buried as their paths weapons and escape routes.

FROM HEATHER

When Jeremy pitched to me Illegal I was immediately grabbed by the concept, and the fact that GIanna was the female lead. For a while I had wanted to draw a comic with a woman main character, and I was glad that I was able to collaborate with Jeremy on the project. The script was very in depth and explored a lot of politics that we deal with today –racism, sexism, abuse, and the immigrant system. It was a very powerful piece that I think comic books fans today would thoroughly enjoy. Illegal is smart, daring, and different. It stood out to me, and I I am confident others will feel the same.

Reblogged from raptorific  1,267 notes
    Anonymous asked
    Wait wait wait, Jar Jar Binks is annoying, but I've never heard people say he's racist. I'm not disagreeing, I just want to know how he's supposed to be racist.

    Answer:

    raptorific:

    chimalpahin-sama:

    raptorific:

    When I was a child, I read a Boondocks strip starring Jar Jar Binks. Unsure of what the joke was, because the strip had him talking exactly like he did in the movie, I asked my father. He explained that the joke was that many people viewed Jar Jar Binks as a racist stereotype. I was very confused and asked him what he meant. 

    The next day, my dad sat me down and had me watch a movie starring Stepin Fetchit, as well as an episode of Amos n Andy, and several blackface minstrel performances. The common thread in all of them was that at least one character had an identical voice, identical body language, and near-identical mannerisms to Jar Jar Binks.

    Some of them even added “-sa” as a suffix to seemingly random words. When I asked my dad why they kept doing that, my dad told me to notice who they were talking to when they said “yessa” or “nosa” or “mesa” or “yousa.” As it turns out, they only seemed to do this when talking to a white man, and they weren’t saying “-sa,” they were saying “sir.”

    I wish I could find the clips my dad showed me again, because they’re pretty damning, but all I can do is give you the Boondocks strip that originally piqued my interest by combining blackface minstrels’ mannerisms with Jar Jar’s mannerisms and demonstrating that they are indistinguishable from one another:

    Note: Both George Lucas and Ahmed Best, the actor who played Jar Jar Binks have claimed Jar Jar isn’t a racist caricature. On a related note, George Lucas and Ahmed Best are capable of being wrong.

    Yeah I doubt he intended it but intent here is subsumed by the result

    It may have been unconsciously racist, but it was not coincidentally racist. The odds that George Lucas independently invented a character that is identical to a blackface stock character are about the same that someone would write a song that is word-for-word and note-for-note identical to Bohemian Rhapsody without ever having heard it. 

    Like, even if we assume that it was totally unintentional, the best-case scenario is that they heard Bohemian Rhapsody, forgot it, and then unwittingly pulled it from their subconscious, believing it to be an original composition, and the worst-case is that they were jut hoping nobody would notice their song is just Bohemian Rhapsody.

Reblogged from wocinsolidarity  728 notes

wocinsolidarity:

Campaign shows effects of ‘subtle racism’ on Indigenous Aussies

black-australia:

Thirty seven per cent of respondents said they thought Indigenous Australians were “sometimes a bit lazy” and one in five said they would move away if an Indigenous Australian sat near them.” 

But racism doesn’t exist in Australia, right? 

Reblogged from thisisnotlatino  1,764 notes

thisisnotlatino:

Woody Allen Says He Won’t Hire A Black Actor Unless The Role Calls For One

So, you know Woody Allen, of course. The filmmaker who’s seemingly been a critics’ darling, since the early 70’s; Your typical liberal New Yorker, who also loves to play jazz. But there’s that one thing though. You know what I’m talking about. That one thing that’s been whispered about, or even loudly discussed, ever since Allen’s started writing and directing his own films. And that thing is, the fact that you never see black people in his movies.

And considering that most of his films have been set in New York, one of the most racially diverse cities on the entire planet, how is it that black people are virtually non-existent in his films?

Well that’s not entirely true. There have been a few exceptions. There was Sonia Rolland playing Josephine Baker in “Midnight in Paris,” although she was basically relegated to the background, as an extra with no lines. And there was Hazelle Goodman in his 1997 film “Deconstructing Harry,” playing… take a guess, a prostitute but of course.

And that’s about as much as I can come up with.

So what’s the problem? Why hasn’t Allen had black actors in his films?

Well, he was just recently asked that question in a profile about him, in the New York Observer (HERE). When asked why black actors haven’t appeared in his films, the writer of the piece states that Allen was “horrified” when the subject was brought up.

But Allen has his reasons. It’s very simple. According to the filmmaker: “Not unless I write a story that requires it. You don’t hire people based on race. You hire people based on who is correct for the part. The implication is that I’m deliberately not hiring black actors, which is stupid. I cast only what’s right for the part. Race, friendship means nothing to me except who is right for the part.”

O.K. you want to run that by me again. Talk about contradictory. He doesn’t hire a black actor unless the story requires it but at the same time he doesn’t hire based on race. HUH? I’ve read it a few times already and still doesn’t make sense.

But not to fear because Allen is friends with both Chris Rock, who he once took out to dinner in Rome and Spike Lee “I’m friendly with Spike Lee. We don’t socialize, but I don’t socialize with anyone.” There’s a punchline: “I don’t have white friends either.”

Oh that Woody. Always good for a laugh.

So what do you say about this or you really don’t care? Or is Allen really being upfront and honest about how many filmmakers think. That is unless the part actually calls for a black or POC actor it’s not even on their wavelength. That should not be really surprise anyone should it?

The message is basically if you’re a black actor don’t bother showing up at any casting calls for Allen’s movie. But hey, Tyler is still hiring.


Slime ball.
-m

Reblogged from aravenhairedmaiden  487 notes

When I wrote about the whitewashing in tsunami disaster film The Impossible last year, I was given a dressing down by outraged commenters who deplored my “inability to look past race”.

But the idea that race is something we can transcend in a world still reeling from colonialism and its racist legacies is a notion only privileged white people can afford to entertain. As Waleed Aly wrote in The Sydney Morning Herald last Friday, there is no such thing as racial neutrality:

"Only white people have the chance to be neutral because in our society only white is deemed normal; only whiteness is invisible. Every other race is marked by its difference, by its conspicuousness – by its non-whiteness."

Every time people of colour are whitewashed - and it happens with alarming frequency - those of us who dare complain are told not to overreact, that it is just entertainment, that we shouldn’t play the race card. After all, why should race matter in a good film?

It matters because actors of colour are routinely sidelined. They may get literally a handful of leading roles per year in films where race is an essential aspect of the narrative such as 12 Years A Slave, but are usually relegated to minor roles such as the black ‘sassy’ friend, or the Asian nerdy sidekick, as this parody video shows.

By Source (via aravenhairedmaiden)
Reblogged from xlivvielockex  656 notes

Felicia Day, on her original audition for Buffy:

prophecygrrrl:

she-hulk-smash:

bituon:

belinsky:

I actually auditioned the year before for Angel, I think for the part that Amy Acker got. I don’t think I got very far. But it was nice that they brought me in again for Buffy — my character was supposed to be an Asian girl. 

ah

sighhhh

Fucking…. Ugh. And this isn’t the only time Joss has pulled these shenanigans. Kaylee Frye from Firefly was originally written as an Asian woman.

as were both of the Tams, Detective Tanaka from Dollhouse (played by Mark Sheppard), and Dr. Lin from Cabin in the Woods (played by Amy Acker). and these are just the ones that we know of, with obvious Asian last names.

Sadder still that the only other Asian Potential in Buffy couldn’t speak English and her foreignness and inability to communicate was played off as sooo hilarious oop~

Just over a quarter (25.9 percent) of the 3,932 speaking characters evaluated were from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups.

A full 74.1 percent were white, 14.1 percent black, 4.9 percent Hispanic, 4.4 percent Asian, 1.1 percent Middle Eastern, 1 percent American Indian or Alaskan Native and 1.2 percent were from “other” races/ethnicities.

No meaningful change has been observed in the frequency of any racial/ethnic group on screen in 600 popular films between 2007 and 2013.

By

USC study released last week shows that nothing has changed between 2007 and 2013.  

Nearly 75% of speaking roles go to white actors.